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'Expert opinion' news articles - Page 14

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New Kingston University Business and Law Dean to strengthen emphasis on international education

Posted Friday 25 July 2014

 New Kingston University Business and Law Dean to strengthen emphasis on international education

Kingston University's new Dean of Business and Law plans to focus on helping students spend time abroad as part of their degrees when he takes the helm at the start of the next academic year.

Professor Ronald Tuninga, who is currently dean at the prestigious AVT Business School in Copenhagen, Denmark, will take up his post at the Faculty in September. "What I am particularly looking forward to is attracting more international students to the University," he explained. "The widest diversity possible will create great ideas and help students to think in a more entrepreneurial way."...


Kingston University's Stanley Picker Gallery given boost in Arts Council England funding shake-up

Posted Thursday 10 July 2014

The increased funding by Arts Council England will help projects, such as The Last Man held in 2013, to be given the chance to exhibit at the Stanley Picker GalleryKingston University's Stanley Picker Gallery will have its annual funding from Arts Council England increased by 55 per cent as part of a major shake-up of how its money is distributed across the country.

Gallery director David Falkner said the new investment of £240,000 over a three year period, starting in April 2015, was a major endorsement of the Stanley Picker Gallery's previous, current and future projects. The funds will be matched by the Stanley Picker Trust with the aim of increasing the reach of the Gallery while a new partnership with the Jerwood Charitable Foundation will support the development of an array of new digital commissions that may include social media, mobile phones and the Gallery's website.

The renewed backing from Arts Council England, which distributes public and Lottery funds to theatre, art, dance and other cultural ventures, comes as 670 other organisations were also told they would be supported next year. The figure was down from the current crop of 703 as The Arts Council continues to deal with a 36 per cent cut in government grants over the past four years.

The funding represented a huge vote of confidence in challenging times, Mr Falkner said. "We have worked hard for many years to support contemporary artists and designers, at crucial stages of their careers, to make ambitious new work that is first premiered here at the Gallery before going on to be seen by audiences far beyond Kingston," he said. "The increased funding will mark a major shift in our organisation and will allow us to be even more ambitious with our future programmes - especially with the Stanley Picker Trust also generously increasing their support for the work we do."

In the past year alone, Stanley Picker Fellowship commissions have been seen by audiences from across the globe with Turner Prize winner Elizabeth Price, designer Marloes ten Bhömer and artist Andy Holden having presented to audiences at London's Whitechapel Gallery and Victoria and Albert Museum as well as Spike Island in Bristol. Current fine art fellow Laura Oldfield Ford recently exhibited at Tate Britain in the highly acclaimed Ruin Lust while design fellow Fabien Cappello is currently showing in Useful and Beautiful at London's Geffrye Museum.

London area director for Arts Council England Joyce Wilson said the organisation was pleased to be able to continue its support of the gallery. "We look forward to seeing the Stanley Picker Gallery's ambitious new commissions come to fruition," she added.

The increased funding by Arts Council England will help projects, such as The Last Man held in 2013, to be given the chance to exhibit at the Stanley Picker Gallery


Kingston University academic calls for robust police investigation into evidence CIA flights carrying terror suspects landed in Scotland

Posted Friday 27 June 2014

Kingston University academic calls for robust police investigation into evidence CIA flights carrying terror suspects landed in Scotland

Researchers behind a groundbreaking project which tracks thousands of flights linked to rendition are calling for a robust police investigation into evidence that a CIA jet landed in Glasgow after carrying an alleged 9/11 mastermind to a secret torture prison in Poland.Rendition involves terror suspects being transported from around the globe to secret locations for enhanced interrogation.

It has emerged that Scottish detectives are investigating the 2003 stopover after the alleged September 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was taken to Poland. They are also probing five other cases which researchers say were part of CIA 'rendition circuits', where terror suspects are moved illegally between secret detention and torture sites....


Kingston University teams up with industry experts to discuss low-cost space travel at UKLaunch symposium

Posted Thursday 26 June 2014

Jack James Marlow presents at UKLaunchKingston University's School of Aerospace and Aircraft Engineering has hosted the first UKLaunch symposium, an initiative that could see the University help develop a low-cost satellite launcher for the UK space industry.

The symposium brought academics, students and industry representatives together to examine how the UK can get involved in the 'low-cost access to space business'. Speakers included representatives from the UK Space Agency, Civil Aviation Authority, Reaction Engines, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd, and Nammo AS alongside Kingston staff and students.

Kingston students impressed the symposium with their knowledge. Jack James Marlow, PhD Rocket Propulsion student, explained the features of the rocket lab at Roehampton Vale, including the modular, bi-propellant rocket engine he developed. This is used by Kingston students and can also be employed in research and consultancy activities for industry.

Third year Aerospace Engineering students Matthew Edwards, Stuart Watson and Jared Godfrey also presented work from their dissertations. This included small satellite launch vehicle designs plus a possible cooling method for the bi-propellant rocket engine as well an aero spike design that can add an extra 20-40 per cent thrust.

At the symposium Newton Launch Systems shared its research findings, while other speakers discussed the technological options, economics, politics and UK supply chain capabilities involved in the development of a small UK satellite launch vehicle similar to a 21st century commercial version of the BLACK ARROW.

Astro Demonstrator

The eventual aim is to create a consortium that shares the vision of a UK launch into orbit no later than 28 October 2021 - the 50th anniversary of the British satellite carrier rocket BLACK ARROW and its payload, the satellite Prospero.


Kingston University lecturer's industry-based approach to education earns National Teaching Fellowship award

Posted Thursday 12 June 2014

Kingston University lecturer's industry-based approach to education earns National Teaching Fellowship award

A Kingston Business School academic's industry-based teaching approach has led to her being awarded a prestigious National Teaching Fellowship from the Higher Education Academy.

Nominees for what has become one of the most coveted awards in higher education underwent a rigorous application process to demonstrate their ongoing commitment to teaching excellence. Dr Deborah Anderson, an associate professor in strategy, marketing and innovation at Kingston, impressed the judges with her teaching initiative, 'Employer Insights', which brings students into the heart of industry to compile research by interviewing leading figures in the world of marketing....


Prize-winning author Hilary Mantel and Kingston University Chancellor playwright Bonnie Greer to judge new writing competitions

Posted Tuesday 13 May 2014

Prize-winning author Hilary Mantel and Kingston University Chancellor playwright Bonnie Greer to judge new writing competitions

Kingston University is looking to establish itself on the literary world map following the launch of its first ever writing competitions.

The Kingston Writing School and Kingston University Press - the University's in-house independent publishing company - are jointly running two competitions. The 'Kingston Writing School Hilary Mantel International Short Story Competition' is being judged by the double Man Booker Prize-winning author, and the 'Kingston University Press Bonnie Greer Stories to Read Aloud Competition' is being judged by the University's current Chancellor, American playwright Bonnie Greer OBE....


Kingston University cultural media expert to share insight at British Library exhibition showcasing historical role of comic books

Posted Tuesday 6 May 2014

Kingston University cultural media expert to share insight at British Library exhibition showcasing historical role of comic books

A new exhibition at the British Library celebrating the history of comic books is an opportunity to show there is more to the art form than just superheroes, according to a senior Kingston University academic.

Cultural media commentator Professor Will Brooker, who has published extensively on such icons as Batman and Alice in Wonderland, will be taking part in a discussion at the Comics Unmasked exhibition which runs until August 19. He said the fact such a prestigious venue was hosting the exhibition showed that a medium, often dismissed as being disposable, had come of age. "The good thing is that the event isn't just focused on the past few decades, it's going back to Victorian times and covering such topics as political cartoons and the role of comics in the suffragette movement," he said. "These days comic books are often just associated with superheroes but, as the title of the exhibition suggests, there's a lot more to it than that."...


Reforms mean children and vulnerable adults may not be properly heard, Kingston Law School expert warns

Posted Wednesday 23 April 2014

Government reforms to family law  could put children and vulnerable adults at risk, according to Professor Penny Cooper. Picture posed by model: ImageBroker/REXThe new 26-week time limit for cases where children are taken into care, designed to further reduce delays, could in fact lead to injustices taking place, a Kingston Law School academic has warned.

The changes are part of a package of family justice system reforms which also see new combined Family Courts come into being in England and Wales.

The new time limit may not be in the interests of justice in all cases, Professor Penny Cooper explained. "While there is much to be welcomed in these reforms, the renewed emphasis on completing care cases in 26 weeks means there is a real danger that children and vulnerable adults such as those who have been abused, or those with learning difficulties or disabilities, will not be properly heard," she said. "This time limit could be problematic if the desire to get on with completing a case overrides the need to get special measures in place for the vulnerable."

Professor Cooper also suggested the legislation represented a missed opportunity to bring in a proper scheme to protect the vulnerable in the family courts. "When the government brought in these new policies it could have introduced reforms to ensure that such measures as intermediaries for children or TV links for intimidated witnesses are available in family courts in the same way they are in the criminal courts," she said.

The need for the Professor Penny Cooper believes the Government has missed an opportunity to introduce similar measures for witnesses in the new family courts that currently exist for criminal cases.government to make this type of resources available was highlighted in the Family Justice Review in 2011 but it hadn't taken up the challenge, she said. "The court has a duty to make adjustments for the vulnerable but there is now the added pressure of time on family judges as well as the existing lack of resources."

There are about 270,000 new family cases each year dealing with issues such as local authority intervention, divorce, domestic violence and adoption.

The Family Justice review also found that vulnerable children were having their "futures undermined" by excessive delays, with care and supervision cases taking an average of 56 weeks.

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