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'Research' news articles - Page 5

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Kingston University scientists help unlock DNA of tropical snail that spreads deadly disease

Posted Tuesday 4 July 2017

Kingston University scientists help unlock DNA of tropical snail that spreads deadly disease

Scientists from Kingston University have played a pivotal role in uncovering vital information about the biology of a snail that spreads a deadly parasitic disease in tropical rivers and lakes.

The small freshwater snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, is known to carry parasitic worms called schistosomes – which, when released into rivers, can infect people causing human schistosomiasis. The tropical disease affects more than 260 million people in developing countries and leaves many with chronically debilitating damage to organs, particularly the bladder and liver. Adults and children are at risk when they fish, swim or play in water infested with the parasite, which is estimated to contribute to the deaths of around 200,000 a year in sub-Saharan Africa alone....


New letterpress facility at Kingston University, named in honour of former academic Ian Noble, reflects growth of hands-on learning in the digital age

Posted Thursday 29 June 2017

New letterpress facility at Kingston University, named in honour of former academic Ian Noble, reflects growth of hands-on learning in the digital age

A letterpress and bookbinding workshop has officially opened at Kingston University's Knights Park campus. Housed within a bespoke glass walled space, the facility provides students with the opportunity to study art and design by taking a hands-on approach to design practice.

Known as Noblepress, the facility is named in memory of the former Head of MA Communication Design Ian Noble who passed away in 2013. The workshop boasts collections of both lead and wooden typefaces, with students able to hand set the type and print on machines made in the 1960s using a process invented by German Johannes Gutenberg in the 15th Century....


Will Wonder Woman's success pave the way for other superheroines? asks Kingston expert Will Brooker

Posted Wednesday 28 June 2017

 Will Wonder Woman's success pave the way for other superheroines? asks Kingston expert Will Brooker

Wonder Woman, directed by Patty Jenkins, is breaking records for a film directed by a woman - the first to take over $100 million at the US box office in its opening weekend. But it's also easily exceeding the performance of superhero movies directed by men. Unlike its predecessors Batman V Superman (Zack Snyder, 2016) and Suicide Squad (David Ayer, 2016), Wonder Woman's success continued beyond the opening weekend. In fact, it had the lowest drop in numbers of any recent superhero movie, suggesting that audiences are spreading the word, encouraging their friends and returning for repeat viewings. With a 93% approval rating on review aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes, it has also proved a critical success - far better received than the Tom Cruise vehicle, The Mummy, and Johnny Depp's latest Pirates of the Caribbean.

The film's sustained box office numbers are due in large part to its appeal to female viewers, who made up an estimated 52% of its opening audience, and who are responding enthusiastically to seeing a woman at the centre of a superhero movie, defying men's rules and expectations. Apart from notorious flops like Elektra (2005) and Catwoman (2004), and 1980s oddities like Supergirl, women have had little representation in the Marvel or DC Comics cinematic universes. Lois Lane, supposed to be an outstanding journalist and independent professional, is often reduced to a damsel in distress for Superman to rescue. Harley Quinn, the inspiration for so many costumes last Halloween, is largely defined in relation to Batman and the Joker. Black Widow remains one of the few Avengers not to earn her own solo movie - and was even left out of merchandise....


Diaries of a writer – Kingston University's recently acquired Iris Murdoch journals mark new research chapter exploring work of late novelist and philosopher

Posted Wednesday 28 June 2017

Diaries of a writer – Kingston University's recently acquired Iris Murdoch journals mark new research chapter exploring work of late novelist and philosopher

Iris Murdoch fans and scholars finally have an opportunity to read between the lines as 15 volumes of the writer's private journals, covering the period from 1939 to 1996, become available at Kingston University. The documents – which until now have been kept privately – have been donated to the University by Audi Bayley, the widow of John Bayley, who was married to Iris Murdoch from 1956 until her death in 1999.

The gift also includes hundreds of unpublished poems, manuscripts, notebooks and letters, adding to the comprehensive collection already owned by the University which encompasses the late writer's Oxford and London libraries along with more than 3,500 letters written by Murdoch....


Is your child a crybaby? New comparison chart developed by Kingston University researcher sheds light on tiny tots' tears

Posted Tuesday 27 June 2017

Is your child a crybaby? New comparison chart developed by Kingston University researcher sheds light on tiny tots' tears

A chart that enables parents to calculate if their baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University researcher, following a study of colic and crying in babies from across the world.

The data is based on analysis of existing studies of almost 8,700 babies – and has resulted in the first universal chart which shows the average amount of crying in babies during the first three months, plus compares colic and crying in babies from a number of different countries....


Research reveals vapers who continue to smoke are in denial about their addiction and could struggle to kick the habit

Posted Monday 26 June 2017

Research reveals vapers who continue to smoke are in denial about their addiction and could struggle to kick the habit

People who vape as well as smoke traditional cigarettes may find it harder to quit as they don't see themselves as smokers, according to research undertaken by Kingston University.

Describing a typical smoker as smelly, inconsiderate and lacking self-control, many who use e-cigarettes – also known as vaping – while continuing to smoke traditional cigarettes are likely to try to distance themselves from a group they regard negatively, the research found....


Civic reception guests invited to put Kingston University's high-impact research under the microscope at showcase event

Posted Tuesday 20 June 2017

Civic reception guests invited to put Kingston University's high-impact research under the microscope at showcase event

From getting hands-on with the latest virtual reality technology to discovering how to help pre-school children grapple with numbers and maths, visitors to Kingston University's civic reception were treated to a taste of how its researchers are playing a pivotal role in addressing real-life issues.

Guests from the local community were joined by the town's mayor Councillor Julie Pickering and a host of alumni, academics and dignitaries at the annual event at the University's Penrhyn Road campus, which shone a spotlight on an array of its high-impact research. Interactive displays exploring everything from the public's role in halting the spread of antibiotic resistance to the history of the institution itself impressed visitors, while researchers shared their big ideas first-hand in a series of talks. Topics ranged from revolutionising how women are represented in superhero comics to the role of experts in shaping the news and the benefit of multisensory rooms for people with dementia....


Award-winning Kingston University staff and leading healthcare researcher recognised in Queen's Birthday Honours List

Posted Monday 19 June 2017

Award-winning Kingston University staff and leading healthcare researcher recognised in Queen's Birthday Honours List

Two leading champions of diversity, inclusivity and widening access to higher education have been recognised for their achievements in this year's Queen's Birthday Honours List – alongside an academic whose pioneering research is helping stroke survivors regain their independence.

Kingston University's newly appointed Director of Student Achievement Nona McDuff was awarded an OBE for services to higher education in the monarch's 91st birthday honours. Associate Director of Widening Participation Jenni Woods and Fiona Jones, Professor of Rehabilitation Research, have both been awarded MBEs for services to widening access to higher education and services to stroke rehabilitation respectively....


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