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Architecture MA

Mode Duration Attendance Start date
Full time 1 year 3 days a week To be confirmed

Choose Kingston's Architecture MA

This course is structured to allow you the maximum opportunity to explore design through the thoughtful engagement with site, precedent and materials, to build upon your previous education and practice, to develop individual strengths, to explore theoretical issues and to gain familiarity with UK practice. The admission criteria are set to ensure that only those with appropriate previous educational achievement within the discipline and who are capable of independent study will be admitted.

Key features

  • This course will enable you to demonstrate a critical understanding of architecture as a cultural, social and technical activity and how it impacts on human and physical environments.
  • You will gain a critical awareness and a systematic understanding of the issues inherent in contemporary design practice.
  • You will develop an independent learning ability required for high-level, structured continuing professional development.

What will you study?

The programme offers you the opportunity to engage with current theoretical and ethical issues relevant to contemporary design practice and to develop your own position within current architectural discourse. It will also introduce internationally educated students to UK professional registration criteria, and to projects that encompass the range of issues against which those criteria are measured.

Your main focus will be on the relationship between architecture and the physical, cultural and temporal context, with the investigation of site in all its manifestations and meanings as central. You will develop your skills and knowledge in this area prior to embarking on major design propositions. For this reason, precedent and theoretical studies are embedded as integral elements of the design modules, with accompanying seminar and lecture support.

Assessment

Projects, reports, seminars, design presentations, essays and case studies.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules

  • Architecture is a critical practice. A work of architecture is conditioned by the primary relationships it establishes with immediate physical, environmental and social conditions, understood with the wider context of society, material culture, architectural thought and history.

    This module supports the introduction and continuing development of sophisticated, analytical, design research skills, employed and demonstrated within the conception, ongoing development and physical manifestation of a coherent design project. The module introduces a range of research methods appropriate to architecture, provides practice of conducting research via primary and secondary sources and introduces writing as a form of representation that can be used to inform practice. The module also introduces conventions of academic practice appropriate to architecture and supports students to develop an individual and critically informed position in relation to their practice and future career development. Students are asked to consider the ways in which such cultural and historical understandings inform the development of their own design propositions.

     
  • Good design successfully engages the ethical, regulatory and professional conditions, established by society, as elements that are integral to a creative process and the development of a coherent, successful architectural proposition. It is the result of a reflective and iterative process, whereby all aspects of a developing project are continually re-evaluated, both in relation to one another and in response to external contexts, in order to ensure their continuing validity and their eventual synthesis.

    This module asks students to become agents of good design, and to integrate developing ideas relating to architecture as an ethical, intellectual, practical, and professional discipline. As designers, students will identify, evaluate, formulate and record the complex range of factors, across a range of scales, which inform the ongoing design proposal and investigate the regulatory, contractual, and economic environment of professional practice, which underpins architectural production.

     
  • Good design successfully engages the ethical, regulatory and professional conditions, established by society, as elements that are integral to a creative process and the development of a coherent, successful architectural proposition. It is the result of a reflective and iterative process, whereby all aspects of a developing project are continually re-evaluated, both in relation to one another and in response to external contexts, in order to ensure their continuing validity and their eventual synthesis.

    This module asks students to become agents of good design, and to integrate developing ideas relating to Architecture as an ethical, intellectual, practical, and professional discipline. As designers, students will identify, evaluate, formulate and record the complex range of factors, across a range of scales, which inform the ongoing design proposal and investigate the regulatory, contractual, and economic environment of professional practice, which underpins architectural production.

     
  • The resolution of a work of architecture occurs, ultimately, through its construction. Materials determine the tectonic expression of a building, articulated through a critical attitude to its structure, construction, and its modification of the environment. If these processes of making and construction are to successfully engage with the wider concerns of form, use, culture and place, whilst also responding to increasingly complex and highly regulated procurement infrastructures, then they need to be considered as an integral part of an holistic process of design development, one that encompasses both strategic and detailed thinking.

    This module develops a student's ability to critically research materials and to think strategically about the relationship between individual building elements and larger systems. The module asks students to resolve detailed aspects of the material, structural, environmental, and tectonic concerns of their project, constructing relationships across a series of iterative and developing levels of detail, where complex and often overlapping systems and components are integrated, across a range of scales. It asks the student to begin to consider the interrelationship of craft and manufacture within a professional context where the architect is increasingly understood as a specifier, utilising the products of universalised, mass production in response to the increasingly stringent parameters of regulation and economics.

     
  • The design thesis is an opportunity for the student to reflect upon and represent a sophisticated, holistic and intellectually rigorous architectural proposition, through which the elements of their own development, throughout the course, become embodied. Underpinning such an ambition is the ability to reflect upon, critically evaluate, integrate and resolve issues that emerge from immediate contextual conditions, the wider concerns of making, practice, use and the history of Architecture, alongside those of society and culture, as a whole.

    This module is the culmination of a year's study, where the various demands and concerns of a complex work of architecture are drawn together as a synthetic whole. It requires the student to demonstrate the sophisticated thinking, clearly articulated strategies and analytical research techniques that have been applied to the development of a project, and to evidence their comprehensive understanding of the complex and often contradictory issues at stake in formulating an architectural proposition. The design thesis should communicate the resolution of the year's project, utilising and demonstrating the range of abilities, skills and techniques acquired through the course. It allows the student to extend and deepen their investigation, through the undertaking of a extended piece of design research into a key aspect of the project and through the resolution of a detailed spatial and material element of the final building. At the same time it asks the student to reflect upon the body of work as a whole, through a concise piece of writing. Situated as key parts of an eloquent thesis document, these parallel and overlapping studies both declare the intentions of the project and afford the opportunity for students to begin to articulate their own position as architects and emerging professionals.

     

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

For further information:

Postgraduate admissions administrator
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 4646
Email us

Location

This course is taught at Knights Park

View Knights Park on our Google Maps

For further information:

Postgraduate admissions administrator
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 4646
Email us

Location

This course is taught at Knights Park

View Knights Park on our Google Maps
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