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Financial Economics MA

Mode Duration Start date
Full time 1 year September 2018
Part time 2 years September 2018

Choose Kingston's Financial Economics MA

This MA will enable you to have a sound understanding of the functions, institutions and instruments of finance, and to know how and why financial systems differ. Taking a pluralist theoretical approach, the MA provides an in-depth study of how finance affects the broader economy, and how the behaviour of firms, households and governments are adapting as the financial sector evolves through processes of innovation and growth. Drawing at all times on empirical data - from flow of funds at the macro level down to balance sheet analysis at the micro level of the firm - you will develop the key analytical skills necessary for carrying out research in contemporary issues in financial economics.

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Key features

  • This course offers a good preparation for work in a range of public and private institutions that require a real knowledge of finance and its effect on the broader economy. The microeconomic skills you'll develop can be used in roles that undertake company valuation such as private banks or pension funds. The macro focus lends itself to risk management in financial institutions, or in domestic and international regulatory agencies, as well as any organisation looking at the link between finance and development such as development banks. Like all economics postgraduates, you will be very well placed to gain roles in the Government Economic Service, in economic consultancy or policy positions in think-tanks and non-governmental organisations, but you will have an additional edge with your critical knowledge of finance.
  • Lectures are supplemented by seminars, giving an opportunity for regular feedback and discussion.
  • The University's Economics department is actively engaged in research and publication on financial topics, and you will benefit from regular staff seminars and workshops.

What will you study?

You will study core aspects of macro- and microeconomic theories, taking a pluralist approach, and develop an understanding of the long-term historical and conceptual context of contemporary issues and debates. Consequently, you will master a range of economic analysis, key analytical skills and empirical background necessary to participate in discussions on financial economic issues.

You will work individually with a member of staff to choose a topic for your dissertation, research this topic and write up your conclusions. Your topic will be a contemporary issue relating to financial economics. You will work on your dissertation with a member of the Economics department who specialises in and pursues research in the field of financial economics.

Assessment

Graded problem sets, practical coursework, essays, examinations, thematic case studies, policy briefs, and dissertation.

The Department of Economics is actively involved in research on questions of deep current concern, including macroeconomic instability, employment policy, financial regulation, and issues surrounding government intervention. Students will benefit from the active involvement of members of the Department in research projects for international economic organisations and think tanks.

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You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Compulsory modules

  • This module develops an historical and analytical narrative of the transformation of economic life from the rise of capitalism and the first and second industrial revolutions to the emergence of the present day globalised and financialised world; it also presents parallel developments in the history of economic ideas.  It gives students an opportunity to view the history of the last half millennium through the prism of industrial revolutions and economic crises and examines how, and how well, contemporaneous thinkers such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall and John Maynard Keynes dealt with these dramatic transformations in material life.

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  • This module introduces students to macroeconomic theory and policy at an advanced level. The module first deals with the fundamental issues of demand, growth, unemployment and inflation in the context of classical and Keynesian approaches to understanding aggregate economic behaviour. The module then discusses selected issues in current economic policy and illustrates how different economic theories approach these issues, how economic models are applied to current problems and how different theories lend themselves to different policy conclusions. The topics covered will differ each semester but may well include issues such as unemployment, financial stability and the causes and effects of changes in income distribution.

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  • This module provides students with an understanding of the role of finance in the contemporary economic landscape, covering the central topics in corporate finance and financial risk management. It explores the nature and the causes of modern financial innovation and the way it affects economic agents. It discusses proper policy responses and regulation that might tame financial instability and enhance economic growth. The breadth of student knowledge is expanded by consideration of empirical instances of the phenomena under investigation.

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  • This first part of the module introduces a range of econometric methods from the perspective of their usefulness in refining and applying economic theory in the context of substantive economic problems. The module aims to develop students' ability both to understand the analytical basis of these methods and to put them into practice in the context of empirical verification and economic policy decisions.

    The second part of the module microeconomic analysis explores the theory of consumer and producer behaviour. It introduces game theory as an important framework for contemporary economic analysis. Students will learn to manipulate theoretical models of microeconomic behaviour and apply them to the analysis of policy issues.

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  • Each student completes a separate individual research project under the supervision of a member of staff. Students may propose a title of their own or choose one in agreement with a member of staff. The main purpose of the project is to enable students to demonstrate knowledge of how economic ideas can be applied in greater length and depth than is feasible in the context of a taught course. Upon completion of the individual research project each student will have designed and implemented a research project in applied or theoretical economics, normally including a critical literature survey and the evaluation of evidence (as appropriate to the project title). A workshop and supervisory meetings are provided to help students in their choice of title and to ensure progression of research.

    EC 7011 provides opportunities for students to develop academic and professional working skills. The module contributes to key professional working and employability skills e.g. working to deadlines; originality; writing coherently and analytically.

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We aim to ensure that all courses and modules advertised are delivered. However in some cases courses and modules may not be offered. For more information about why, and when you can expect to be notified, read our Changes to Academic Provision.

A copy of the regulations governing this course is available here

Details of term dates for this course can be found here

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Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

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Contact us

Admissions team

*5p per minute from a BT landline. Call charges from other providers may vary.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps
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