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Museum and Gallery Studies MA: Who teaches this course

About the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture

FADA facultyThis course is delivered by the Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture's School of Art & Design History. This locates the MA within a highly creative and energetic environment that directly informs the programme and its teaching.

Key staff are responsible for leading individual course components and supplemented by a wide range of practitioners from our collaborating institutions, including curatorial, public engagement, learning, marketing, design, exhibitions, digital, research, management and archives.

Staff teaching on this course

Dr David Lawrence

Title: Acting head of school and associate professor, The School of Art and Design History

David Lawrence is industry-grown and architect-trained with a doctorate; a widely published writer of architectural and design histories. His research interests lie in all places where people, design and movement meet, from the modernist period to contemporary culture, and in critical theory. He is especially interested in architecture, interiors, three-dimensional, branding and graphical design for organised systems of human enterprise, be they as specific as transportation in cities, or as representations of leisure and class in popular culture.

Dr Helen Wickstead

Title: Senior lecturer

Helen Wickstead is an archaeologist and lecturer. She has a doctorate in archaeology from University College London and has been elected to the professional Institute for Archaeologists (IFA) at the highest corporate level. She is the author of the book Theorising Tenure, (an examination of the material co‐construction of property and identity), and has written several journal articles investigating historical and contemporary image‐making – drawing, mapping and viewing – across disciplines. She is the director (with Leo Duff) of 'art+archaeology', a project which has created more than 20 funded art residencies, and numerous art/archaeology events and exhibitions.

With more than 15 years' experience of working as an archaeologist in France, Czech Republic, Turkey and the UK, Helen has led numerous campaigns of survey and excavation including the Shovel Down Project and All Saints Kingston Geophysical Survey. She is currently director of Damerham Archaeology Project; the excavation and survey of an extraordinary complex of more than 40 archaeological sites clustered around two newly discovered early Neolithic long barrows.

Helen teaches at masters level in heritage and museum and gallery studies, and undergraduate (BSc) courses in forensic archaeology. She also leads an archaeological field school, encouraging people of all ages and backgrounds to get involved.

Helen's work explores materialising processes and practices from prehistory to the present. She is currently researching Cold War practices of remote viewing – including forms of prospection, geophysics and remote sensing. She is working (with Martyn Barber) on publications exploring the history of aerial survey. She continues to explore how visual practices materialise ways of knowing in the arts and sciences.

David Spence

Title: Visiting professor in museum and gallery studies

David Spence is Director of Programmes at the Museum of London, the UK's largest social history museum. He directs the programming of exhibitions, design, events, communications and community engagement for Museum of London in the City and Museum of London Docklands in east London.

In 2007 together with an equitable partnership of Londoners he created the groundbreaking new gallery London, Sugar & Slavery that coincided with the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade by Britain. The gallery, which examines London's role in the transatlantic slave trade, is now an international destination for academics and students studying slavery. He is a consultant on the development of a new Museum of Slavery in Qatar and museums in the Caribbean Leeward Islands.

Prior to joining Museum of London, David was Director of Exhibitions and Display at the National Maritime Museum in London where he was responsible for the £20m fit-out of the Neptune Court galleries including the Trade and Empire Gallery (1999), one of the UK's first galleries to examine Britain's role in the slave trade and its effect on contemporary society. David trained at the Royal College of Art in London and the Universitat der Kunste Berlin. He is author of a number of publications including 10 children's books on the lives of artists.

Dr Harriet Riches

Title: Senior lecturer in art history and visual culture

Harriet joined the School of Art & Design History at Kingston in 2009, having held posts at Middlesex University and the University of Warwick, and taught the history and theory of art and photography at a variety of institutions including London College of Communication, Sotheby's Institute and UCL. Harriet completed her PhD on self‐representation and the performance of the photographic medium in the work of Francesca Woodman at UCL, and has published widely on this topic in the journals Object, Oxford Art Journal and Photographies, and in the book Girls! Girls! Girls! in Contemporary Art (edited by Catherine Grant and Lori Waxman, Intellect, 2011).

Harriet's current research is focused on gender and the historical discourse of photography, and she is working on a book project provisionally titled Camera/Woman: Gender and the History of Photography that addresses the relationship between the construction of femininity and the historiographical construction of the medium of photography from the 1850s to the present day. In addition to her academic research Harriet also writes on contemporary issues in photography, and contribute regularly to the international art publication Afterimage: The Journal of Media Arts and Cultural Criticism.

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This course is taught at Knights Park

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This course is taught at Knights Park

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