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Psychology MSc

Mode Duration Attendance Start date
Full time 1 year Weekdays September 2017
Part time 2 years Weekdays September 2017

Choose Kingston's Psychology MSc

This course offers a masters-level qualification accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and confers eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership. It is particularly suitable if you have insufficient credit in psychology from your first degree to meet BPS accreditation criteria. The course covers all of the key subdisciplines of contemporary psychology and provides extensive training in related research skills.

Find out more about this course:

  • This course confers eligibility for graduate membership of the British Psychological Society with the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC). This is the first step towards becoming a chartered psychologist.
  • You will benefit from modern research labs and offices, as well as excellent computer facilities.
  • The Psychology team is a friendly and dynamic group of researchers, experienced in teaching and in conducting internationally excellent research. The team has research links with universities in Australia, the US and Europe. In addition, eminent psychologists from across the UK present findings from the latest research in psychology, keeping your learning at the cutting edge.

What will you study?

In addition to providing a broad (yet detailed) overview of the subject of psychology, this course promotes critical appraisal in relation to psychological models, theories and methodologies. You will conduct practical research exercises and will produce a substantial research-based dissertation in an area of psychology of your choice (subject to availability). You will acquire skills in data analysis, statistical methods, project design, oral presentations, teamwork and report writing - all of which are sought-after skills by employers.

Assessment

Essays, in-class tests, presentations, unseen examinations, laboratory reports and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules

  • This module provides a broad overview of the key areas that comprise contemporary cognitive psychology and looks at the relationship between physiology and behaviour. It includes memory, attention, language, reasoning, cognitive neuropsychology and introduces the principles of perceptual processes. The module also introduces the neuroanatomical structures and physiological functions that are considered important in regulating behaviour, and then moves on to examine in detail the ways in which such biological substrates contribute to specific psychological processes and behaviours. In addition the module will consider the ways in which various kinds of physiological dysfunction can impact on behaviour and cognition, and the biological bases of perception and motivation (e.g. eating). Topics and issues that are currently attracting considerable research interest will be explored in detail.

     
  • This module is a core module in the MSc Child Psychology and MSc Psychology fields. The module introduces students to the essentials of psychological experimentation and to a range of analysis techniques making use of basic and more advanced (e.g. multivariate) methods. Both experimental and correlational methods are considered along with appropriate techniques of data analysis (e.g. analysis of variance and multiple regression). Both theoretical and practical aspects of experimentation are discussed. The laboratory workshops combine formal teaching with sessions involving hands-on activities. Core factual material is provided via StudySpace with workshops being used to explain key concepts and techniques. The module provides an essential introduction to practical work in psychology, in particular for the MSc dissertation project.

     
  • The dissertation project will be based on a critical literature review addressing complex and contradictory evidence and will usually require carrying out an empirical study using one or more methodologies of data collection such as experiments, observation, psychometric testing, surveys and questionnaires, interviews and field studies. In all cases, the dissertation will involve the analysis of quantitative and/or qualitative data, as well as the presentation and critical evaluation of research findings. Through independent study and meetings with a project supervisor, the dissertation project will allow students to better understand the role of research methodologies, theoretical considerations and ethical issues in psychological research.

     
  • The content of the module will examine a broad range of key theories and empirical research in social, individual and developmental psychology. This core module will allow students to explore current theory and practice in psychology across range of topics that focuses on the person in psychology. In consideration of the social, individual, (human abilities and personality attributes) and developmental areas of enquiry, the scientific approach and the notion of measurement is fundamental. 

     

Optional modules

  • This is an optional module for Level 6 students who wish to expand their knowledge about child development. The module will cover a broad range of issues in developmental psychology including both examples of typical and atypical development, such as reading development and dyslexia, children’s relationships and bullying, language in typical and atypical populations, sensory impairment, children’s understanding of number and dyscalculia, children with Williams Syndrome, among other themes. The module will involve a combination of keynote lectures, interactive lectures and guided independent study during which current theories, methodologies and research will be discussed and critically evaluated. In addition, transferable skills will be fostered through student led interactive discussions and tasks.

     
  • This module provides students with the opportunity to identify and address real-world issues that can benefit from research input by psychologists. Students will gain an appreciation of the challenges of conducting research in professional settings. Students will gain 50 hours of work experience working in a placement to identify and/or applying psychological research findings in a chosen context under the supervision of a workplace supervisor. In addition, 10 seminars will be held at the University where case studies and examples from current placements will be used to compliment the learning objectives. Students will be required to contribute and draw examples of their experiences in their work place and how this informs research in their specific placements. 

    It is expected that students will arrange their own work placements, the suitability of which will be discussed and agreed upon with the module leader and/or the course director. In the absence of an external placement, students will be offered a work placement in the Department of Psychology where they will contribute to a current programme of research relevant to their studies.

    The nature of the work will usually be determined in part by the focus of the postgraduate programme that the student is following. For example, students of child/developmental psychology may choose to collect data or implement research-led practice in local nurseries and schools; students of clinical psychology may evaluate the efficacy of procedures adopted by local rehabilitation services; and students on the Masters in Behavioural Decision Making are likely to choose a placement in organisation that monitors behavioural change.

    Please note that were appropriate, you will be required to ensure that you have CRB checks in place and if collecting data in the workplace, then the appropriate ethical approvals are in place prior to collecting data.

    The workplace activity is intended to extend students’ independent research skills in relevant contexts as well as enhance future employability.

     
  • This module explores the nature and origins of social knowledge and critically evaluates the basis for claims to ‘absolute reality’. The module will be of interest to students who wish to examine contemporary beliefs and assumptions about the world on a range of political, philosophical, psychological and moral issues. In the second semester, earlier theoretical knowledge is applied to the study of collective memory (the memory of people across generations) – a foundational form of social knowledge involved in the construction of identity. The study of social/collective memory raises some political issues.  For example, in the aftermath of conflict, competing versions of the past are often a barrier to reconciliation. Understanding the nature and content of collective memory therefore becomes important. Students should have an interest in the history and politics of conflict including human rights although detailed historical knowledge is not a pre-requisite. Course material comprises film and television documentary, which will broaden and deepen existing knowledge of 20th century events.

     
  • There are two main streams in this module: Part I - Neuropsychology. The module will place a particular emphasis on understanding the effects of brain activity on cognitive and social aspects of human behaviour (and vice-versa). In addition, the module will address the effects of brain injury and neurological impairments with a view to understand models of normal cognitive and social functioning. Video material will be used to illustrate clinical cases when available. Part II – Neuro-rehabilitation. The module will introduce students to modern techniques for the diagnosis of neurological disorders and their neuropsychiatric implications. Interventions for the treatment and management of neurological disorders will be evaluated. Students’ effort and engagement will be essential for a successful and rewarding experience. This will include active participation in lectures and the reading of the indicated material.

     
  • “Creating new circuits in art means creating them in the brain too”.

    Gilles Deleuze

     The aesthetic experience relates not only to natural beauty but also to works of art which can be seen as cultural manifestations of the human mind. For centuries artists have used a varied number of media—from pigments to pixels—to evoke a multitude of perceptions and sensory effects able to trigger powerful rational and emotional responses. Psychology of Art and Film is a young field of study and encompasses a multitude of branches of Psychology. The module will broadly focus on the question: If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, what is it about the human experience that enables us to appreciate it? The focus will be on art in the form of paintings, films, photography and ‘installations’.

    The module will be divided in three core areas: I. The ‘self‘: cognitive aspects modulating the aesthetic experience; II. The ‘environment’: social and cultural aspects modulating the aesthetic experience; and III. Workshops: include talks by invited artists/lecturers and independent visits to Museums, Galleries and Cinemas.

     
  • The module will engage students with the main themes of contemporary health psychology and positive psychology with a particular focus on theory, research, intervention, and application. The students will gain an understanding of the importance of psychological processes in the experience of health and illness, and explore the role of behaviour and emotion in current trends of mortality and morbidity. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the role of positive emotions, optimism, spirituality, flourishing relationships, and community engagement in promoting health, well-being, and happiness. They will also become aware of the crucial roles health psychology and positive psychology have to play in the development and evaluation of physical and psychological health promotion interventions.

     

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

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Admissions team

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

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Contact us

Admissions team

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps
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