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Creative Writing and Film Cultures BA(Hons): Who teaches this course

Staff teaching on this course

Diran Adebayo

Diran AdebayoDiran Adebayo is a novelist, short fiction writer and cultural critic best known for his stylish, inventive tales of London and the lives of African diasporans. His work has been characterised by its interest in multiple cultural identities, subcultures, and its distinctive use of language. His debut novel Some Kind of Black, won him numerous awards, including the Writers Guild of Great Britain's New Writer of the Year Award, the 1996 Saga Prize, a Betty Trask Award, and The Authors' Club's 'Best First Novel' award. It was also long listed for the Booker Prize, and is now a Virago Modern Classic. His second novel, the 'neo-noir fairytale' My Once Upon a Time, solidified his reputation as a groundbreaker. He's appeared on Newsnight, The Culture Show, This Week and the Today programme, discussing everything from politics to popular culture, including sports – the centrepiece of his next book, the memoir, Random, and Cricket. In 2003 The Times Literary Supplement named him one of its Best Young British Novelists and, in 2006, Diran was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. 


Paul Bailey

Paul Bailey has been shortlisted twice for the Booker Prize and won a clutch of other awards. His work focuses on the often grim lives of families and outcasts. His novels include At the Jerusalem; Peter Smart's Confessions; Gabriel's Lament; Sugar Cane; Kitty and Virgil; and Uncle Rudolf.

Non-fiction includes An English Madam - The Life and Work of Cynthia Payne; An Immaculate Mistake - Scenes from Childhood and Beyond; and Three Queer Lives - An Alternative Biography of Naomi Jacob, Fred Barnes and Arthur Marshall. He also edited the Oxford Book of London.

Paul has taught creative writing at the University of East Anglia and in Italy.


Dr Adam Baron

Adam baron Adam Baron is a novelist. He has published four crime novels (Macmillan), which have been translated into Greek, French, and German. His novels have been adapted for BBC Radio 4. His next work, a literary novel called Blackheath, will be published in February, 2016 (Myriad Editions). He is course director for the Creative Writing MA at Kingston University. He will be taking part in the Kingston Writing School reading series and teaches Writing that Works, Narrative Techniques in Popular Fiction and various modules on the Creative Writing MA.


Professor Norma Clarke

Professor Norma ClarkeProfessor Norma Clarke is a literary historian, critic and biographer with particular interests in the 18th century. She has published a number of books on women writers: Ambitious Heights, Dr Johnson's Women, The Rise and Fall of the Woman of Letters and Queen of the Wits: A Life of Laetitia Pilkington. Her latest book, a study of obscure writers in Grub Street and the beginnings of commercial literary culture, will appear in Spring 2016: Brothers of the Quill: Oliver Goldsmith and Friends (Harvard University Press).

Professor Clarke also specialises in fiction. She has published five novels for children (Patrick in Person, Patrick and the Rotten Roman Rubbish, Theo's Time, Trouble on the Day, and The Doctor's Daughter) and teaches children's and young adult fiction on the English literature undergraduate programme.


Steven Fowler

Steven FowlerSteven Fowler is a poet, artist and curator. He works in the modernist and avant garde traditions, across poetry, fiction, theatre, sonic art, visual art, installation and performance. Thematically he's interested in violence and physicality, and work has explored this in both the interpersonal and wider societal senses, with books on prisons, boxing and things like that.  

He also is interested in city and space, historical models of truth (having worked for nearly a decade in the British Museum) and neuroscience and language (in residence at the Wellcome Trust). He also teaches art history at Tate Modern, and has an interest in how literature has intersected with art, or been erroneously separated from it. Academically he is interested in philosophical ethics, through pragmatism mostly, and the 19th 20th and 21st avant garde and modernism. His specialty is modern European literature.

Steven is the editor of 3am magazine and the curator of the Enemies project, which explores collaboration and contemporary poetry. It's a way of creating community in live events and innovating how we experience literature and art live. He had worked in 18 countries with the project and there's events every week or two in London or beyond.


Dr James Miller

James MillerJames Miller is MFA course director and the author of the highly acclaimed novels, Lost Boys (Little, Brown 2008) and Sunshine State (Little, Brown 2010). His short fiction has been published in a wide range of places including the anthologies Still (Negative Press, 2012) Beacons: Stories for our Not So Distant Future (Oneworld, 2013), in the Galley Beggar Press singles club and in numerous magazines including Litro and 3AM Magazine. His research interests include African-American literature, experimental literature and critical theory. 


Dr Meg Jensen

Meg Jensen

 

 

 

 

Title: Associate professor

Specialist subjects

  • Life writing
  • Trauma fiction and the autobiographical
  • Modernist fiction,
  • 19th and 20th century women writers

Recent publications

  • We Shall Bear Witness: Life Narratives and Human Rights (University of Wisconsin Press, 2014)
  • Life Writing: Spirit of the Age and State of the Art (ed. with Jane Jordan; Cambridge Scholars, 2010)

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