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Aerospace Stress Analysis and Advanced Materials

  • Module code: AE7723
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: 7
  • Credits: 30
  • Pre-requisites: AE6022
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

This module builds on the prior knowledge gained in stress analysis and structure of aircraft materials and other properties or an equivalent course of study. It is designed to extend your knowledge of the analytical techniques of stress analysis, plasticity theory and the importance of modern materials in advanced manufacturing processes.

Some of the more advanced theory behind finite element analysis is investigated. The module is primarily delivered through lectures supported by tutorials and by laboratories where applicable. Course materials are available via Canvas where appropriate.

Aims

  • To identify the importance of modern materials in advanced manufacturing processes and to evaluate both materials and processes which are available or being developed.
  • To assess aspects of quality assurance related to advanced materials
  • To extend the student's knowledge of the analytical techniques of stress analysis and also to introduce the students to modern computer-based solutions of stress and structural problems.
  • To apply stress analysis to modern material developments and their significance for economic design.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  • Analyse engineering structures using finite element methods
  • Evaluate stresses and deflections in engineering structures under complex loading.
  • Analyse post failure behaviour of engineering structures
  • Demonstrate the ability to use finite element packages in the solution of time dependent problems eg creep and of non-linear problems eg buckling, large deflections etc.
  • Develop extensive knowledge and understanding of aircraft structure, processes or products.

Curriculum content

  • Aerospace materials
  • Engineering adhesives
  • Super plastic forming
  • Engineering composites
  • Composite design optimisation
  • Joint design
  • Impact damage analysis
  • Fracture and fatigue failure
  • Advanced welding technology
  • Defect assessment
  • Finite element methods
  • Finite Element Modelling (FEM)
  • Thin Plate Deflection Theory
  • Plate buckling
  • Bending and buckling of thin and thick shells.
  • Introduction to plasticity theory.
  • Time-dependent solution techniques.
  • Geometric and material non-linearity

Teaching and learning strategy

The module is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical sessions and industrial visits where appropriate. Teaching notes, guided reading, problem solving and other supplemented materials will be available on-line and can be accessed via the dedicated module site. Formative assessments are integrated into the teaching programme to provide students with feedforward for summative assessments.

A key element of the guided learning hours is solving the structured problem sets.  The structured problem sets including answers will be available from the beginning of the module.  Students will be issued with an indicative set of dates by which each set should be completed.  At postgraduate level, students are expected to have acquired the ability to monitor their own progress and seek help as required from their peers, recommended reading and the teaching team.  For students entering Kingston at postgraduate level, personal tutors will discuss progress in completing the problem sets during their regular meetings.  This should not be required for students continuing their studies at Kingston since the appropriate skills will have been developed at undergraduate level, but personal tutors are available to provide advice if required.

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive UNISTATS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching Prior reading Lectures and practical sessions 30 60
Guided independent study Guided self-study 210
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

The module is summatively assessed through two assignments and an end of module exam. One of assignments is on the application of the finite element method, the other is report on a materials testing experiment.

Regular and detailed formative feedback is provided to students through workshop sessions and group tutorials. Students can monitor their progress by reviewing their performance on the structured problem sets and comparing that with published expectations.

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
1) Analyse engineering structures using finite element methods Examination and assignment 1.
2) Evaluate stresses and deflections in engineering structures under complex loading. Examination and assignment 1.
3) Analyse post failure behaviour of engineering structures Examination and assignment 2.
4) Demonstrate the ability to use finite element packages in the solution of time dependent problems eg creep and of non-linear problems eg buckling, large deflections etc. Examination and assignment 1.
5) Develop extensive knowledge and understanding of aircraft structure, processes or products. Assignment 2.

Elements of Assessment

Description of Assessment Definitive UNISTATS Categories Percentage
FEA Assignment Coursework 25%
Materials lab report Coursework 25%
Final exam Written exam 50%
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any element of assessment is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module.

Bibliography core texts

Introduction to Finite Element Analysis: Formulation, Verification and Validation, by BarnaSzabó and Ivo Babuska , 2011

Bibliography recommended reading

A First Course in the Finite Element Method by Daryl L. Logan, 2011

The Finite Element Method for Solid and Structural Mechanics, Sixth Edition Vol 2, O. C. Zienkiewicz , R. L. Taylor, 2005

Advanced Ceramics and Future Materials, Fritz Aldinger, Volker A. Weberruss, 2010.

Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction William D. Callister Jr., David G. Rethwisch, 8th edition, 2010.

Introduction to Composite Materials Design, Second Edition  by Ever J. Barbero, 2010.

Principles of Composite Material Mechanics, 3rd Edition,by Ronald F. Gibson, 2011.

Damage and Failure of Composite Materials by Ramesh Talreja and Chandra Veer Singh, 2012.

Modern Welding Technology, 6th Edition, by Howard B. Cary and Scott Helzer, 2004.

Introduction to Surface Engineering and Functionally Engineered Materials by Peter M. Martin, 2011.

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