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Change and Creativity

  • Module code: BH7545
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: 7
  • Credits: 15
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

Why do organisations need to change; to become more creative and innovate? How can management help people to achieve their new ideas and practices in a creative and imaginative way?

Change is a defining feature in contemporary organisations, posing key challenges and questions for all sorts of businesses, communities and societies. Implicit in change is the ability and capacity to act creatively in order to maintain healthy organisations. Therefore, to learn more about how organisations change, how to manage it, how people understand it; and, the complexities involved in acting and enacting change through creative processes becomes an essential feature of organisations in order to succeed in the 21st century. All of these exciting issues are explored in this module focusing on both, the epistemological and ontological aspects of creativity and change.

Aims

  • to develop an understanding of the major theories and concepts underpinning approaches to change and creativity management
  • to enhance students' ability to act creatively as change agent within organisations
  • to enable students to understand and practice leading change in innovative, sustainable and responsible ways to develop personal skills and techniques that lead to organisational innovation through change.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  • apply a critical understanding of change management theories and techniques to any organisational situation
  • fulfil the role of change agent, planning and managing organisational change
  • analyse any context within which change is to take place
  • identify, and allow for, creative and innovative spectrum of individual responses to change
  • apply creative and innovative techniques to lead change
  • design creative and innovative programmes for organisational change

Curriculum content

  • The nature of organisational change, why organisations change over time, predictable and unpredictable change.
  • Creativity and innovation in organisational transformation.
  • The Change Kaleidoscope as a tool for analysing the context for change.
  • Individual responses to change, the coping cycle, resistance.
  • Change within a complex system framework (eg., virtual/real space)
  • Creativity and design in leading change (organisational) environments

Teaching and learning strategy

Formal class time will comprise of a mixture of formal tutor-directed input, class discussion, and experiential learning through (theatre) exercises, videos and case studies. Students will be introduced to key theoretical concepts, empirical and practical information as well as creative/innovative approaches and methods related to organisational and management of change. Areas of disagreement or controversy will also be identified in order to foster a critical understanding of their knowledge in this area. In addition, students will be able to clarify points and address the topics covered in more depth through participation in online debates informed by further reading recommended prior to the sessions. These debates will be tailored to foster critical reflections on the practical implications of theory and research findings in leading change. Students will equally evaluate ethical dilemmas faced when leading change programmes in organisations.

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive UNISTATS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching Lectures/ seminar/theatre 32
Guided independent study Independent study; group (online) discussions 118
Total (number of credits x 10) 150

Assessment strategy

A combination of formative and summative assessment methods will be employed. Class discussions, case study analyses and other group work will be formatively assessed.

The assessment consists of two major elements: (i) a practical exam in the form of a group presentation, and (ii) coursework in the form of an individual assignment. The group presentation will provide essential feed forward to prepare students for the individual assessment.
The individual written assignment will involve a critical and creative analysis (supported by theories/models) of any change situation such as a case study, film, documentary or based on their own experiences of change.

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
1) apply a critical understanding of change management theories and techniques to any change situation Formatively through class and online discussions; summatively through change assignment.
2) fulfil the role of change agent, planning and managing organisational change Formatively through class and online discussions; summatively through group work and individual change assignment.
3) identify, and allow for, a broad spectrum of individual responses to change Formatively through class and online discussions; summatively through change assignment.
4) apply creative and innovative techniques to lead change Formatively through class and online discussions; summatively through group work and individual change assignment.
5) design creative and innovative programmes for organisational change Formatively through class and online discussions; summatively through group work and individual change assignment.

Elements of Assessment

Description of Assessment Definitive UNISTATS Categories Percentage
Group Presentation Practical exam 30%
Individual assignment Coursework 70%
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any element of assessment is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module.

Bibliography core texts

Balogun, J. and Hope-Hailey, V. (2008) Exploring Strategic Change, London: Prentice-Hall.

Burnes, B. (2010) Managing Change. Prentice Hall.

Mumford, M. (2012) Handbook of Organizational Creativity. London: Elsevier.

Bibliography recommended reading

Andriopoulos, C. and Dawson, P. (2009) Managing Change, Creativity & Innovation. London: sage Publications

Bate, P. (1995) Strategies for Cultural Change, Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Carnall, C.A. (1999) Managing Change in Organisations, 3rd ed,  London: Prentice-Hall.

Dutta, S. and Manzoni, J.F. (2000) Process Re-Engineering, Organizational Change and Performance Improvement, Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill.

Genus, A. (1999) The Management of Change: Perspectives and Practice, London: International Thomson.

Gratton, L., Hope-Hailey, V., Stiles, P. and Truss, C. (1999) Strategic Human Resource Management: Corporate Rhetoric, Human Reality, Oxford: Oxford University Press, Chapters 8 and 9.

Hughes, M. (2006). Change management: A critical perspective. CIPD

Johnson, G. and Scholes, K. (2002) Exploring Corporate Strategy, 6th ed, London: Prentice-Hall, Chapter 11.

Paton, R. and McCalman, J. (2000) Change Management: A Guide to Effective Implementation, 2nd ed, London: Paul Chapman.

Scott-Morgan, P. (1994) The Unwritten Rules of the Game, New York:McGraw Hill.

Senior, B. (1997) Organisational Change, 2nd ed, London: Pitman.

Thornhill, A., Lewis, P., Millmore, M. and Saunders, M. (2000) Managing Change: A Human Resource Strategy Approach, Harlow: Pearson.

Townley, B. Beech, N. (2011) Managing Creativity: Exploring the Paradox. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Truss, C. and Ely, J. (forthcoming) 'All Change: Transforming NHS Trusts for the 21st Century', British Journal of Healthcare Management.

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