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Creative Futures

  • Module code: DE7301
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: 7
  • Credits: 30
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

Creative Futures lectures and seminars are intended to enable you to develop an approach and focus to your future career and your ongoing personal and professional development. The aim of this module is that through the understanding of the key disciplinary and inter-disciplinary skills and attributes required for a career in the creative industries, you will be able to develop an informed and focused Major Project proposal for the Major Project in Teaching Block 3. This module builds upon the notion that the best jobs/careers in the creative industries do not exist, that they are invented and created from individual creative ambitions and understanding, and explores how this can be approached in practical terms. The programme of study encourages you to develop a personal and critical approach to your future career and its relationship to the development of your individual major project.

The Creative Futures module introduces and develops a range of practical methods by which the foundations of a sustainable and successful design practice and career can be understood and built upon. Lectures, seminars and workshops will introduce and explore key issues and areas that help you to build your understanding of how to develop your own approach to professional career planning. You will also be expected to engage in a range of activities that include: professional competitions, live project work, studio visits and professional practice lectures. This work will support and inform the development of your Major Project Proposal and that will be presented at the end of the module.

Aims

  • To enable you to develop an informed approach and clear focus to your future careers as creative practitioners
  • To provide you with an opportunity to develop and reflect upon your own design ambitions and personal and career development
  • To support you in developing an interdisciplinary creative practice that goes beyond your existing subject specialism
  • To support you in structuring and effectively communicating your intentions for the Major Project
  • To encourage understanding of design environments in both local and global contexts
  • To develop your entrepreneurial abilities through project planning, networking and engaging with the design community and industry.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  • Develop and create a major project proposal to a professional standard that is informed by relevant research and speculation on new and effective approaches to design and that is informed by theoretical and contextual knowledge
  • Demonstrate through professional competitions and /or 'live' project work the engagement with real-world collaboration/contexts and collaborative working
  • Evidence through project work and Major Project Proposal an understanding of relevant career ambitions
  • Engage in critical reflection of their own work, group work and in peer review employing evaluation, contextualization and communication.

Curriculum content

  • Major project proposal
  • Collaborative industry projects
  • Competition projects
  • PDP
  • Lectures (Indicative):
    • Thinking differently: What are the attributes and skills required for a sustainable and durable approach to working in the creative industries? Personal evaluation of the disciplinary and interdisciplinary skills and understandings that designers possess and that extend the role of the designer - how can these be applied to creating opportunities and developing new markets.
    • Enterprise: The business plan, bidding and making applications, tax, IPR, copyright, patent business models, Creative Commons, Copy-left, etc.
    • New Futures: Using technology and new media to build professional networks and to support the development/create a profile.
    • The Major Project Proposal: Writing, developing, testing ideas and presentation
    • Industry led bodies, organisations and professional associations - Key speakers.
    • Case studies: New designers, graduates and alumni present their career trajectory since graduation

Teaching and learning strategy

This module is lecture, seminar and critique-based. Students will be expected to take an active role in group discussion and debate during each teaching session. During this module there will also be talks by visiting designers. In addition, the module will make use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Canvas for communication and dissemination of information between students and staff as well as making online learning materials available to all.  Students should check this site on a daily basis for module information, timetables, sign-ups, updates and additional information following individual project sessions.

All courses based in the Kingston School of Art offer students free access to the online video tutorial platform Lynda.com. This provides a wide range of subjects to choose from, many with downloadable exercise files, including software tutorials covering photography, graphics, web design, audio and music, CAD and Microsoft Office software, as well as courses on Business and Management skills. Some of these are embedded in the curriculum and offer additional self-paced learning, others may be taken at will by students wishing to broaden their employability skills in other areas.

Research Folder: Throughout the module, students should initiate and progress their work by using a research folder. This will allow them to work through and demonstrate their conceptual processes. The Research Folder may include imagery from sketchbooks or notebooks which should be used to generate ideas, to record textual, contextual and visual research, to analyse, test ideas and to reflect upon each stage of the project.

Seminars and tutorials: Students should aim to produce visual work consistently and they will show this at timetabled seminar meetings and at subject tutorials, where they will share their ideas with their tutor and the group. Crucially, they must ensure that they always bring presentable work to these meetings and that it should concisely convey what they have been doing.

Formal Critique (Crit) Presentations: Crit presentations are timetabled into all modules. At these meetings, students will present their work to peers and tutors for specified time periods and receive formative feedback. These meetings are pivotal points in the module, offering them the opportunity to summarise the work they have done and the work they plan to do in a focused, clear and communicative manner.

Feedback /Feedforward: Ensure that students write down or record feedback, references and information given to them at seminars, crits and project tutorials. Feedback can be seen as continuous 'formative assessment' and students should use it to inform their own self-assessment and critical evaluation and reflection.

In summary, the module will be made up of:

Student Learning Activities:

  • Enquiry
  • Exploration
  • Experimentation/Testing
  • Conceptualisation
  • Realisation/Presentation/Documentation
  • Critical reflection

Teaching methods include:

  • Lectures
  • Tutor-led/group-led project discussions
  • Staff and visiting lecturer/speaker presentations
  • Presentations to peers

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive UNISTATS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching Lecture, Seminar, Critique, Presentation 75
Guided independent study 225
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

Formative assessment: The process of formative assessment involves tutor and peer review of students' presentations of work and its subsequent revision on the basis of feedback/feed-forward. Typically these will take place on a weekly basis during the course of the module. Students will be encouraged to communicate their proposal via a PowerPoint style presentation, using a structure provided in the module guide. This will also be presented to peers and tutors to gain formative feedback prior to submission It should comprise the background development of the project proposal and initial testing of the methods that will support their Major Project.

Summative assessment: Summative assessment occurs on completion of the module and is based on the extent to which the student has met the learning outcomes for the module.

For this module students will submit 2 visual summaries, one for each assessment element:

Project Folder 1: The Major Project Proposal Folder

  • A 1000 word Major Project Proposal accompanied by a visual summary. The format and structure of which is provided in the module guide, and accounts for research and development behind the proposal.
  • 500 word Critical Reflection of student's journey throughout the module, accounting for both the Major Project Proposal and the Design Project. This reflects on their individual progress, group work and feedback from peer review employing evaluation, contextualization and communication skills.

Project Folder 2: The Design Project Folder

A Design Project outcome, recorded within a visual summary reflecting of the research, concept development and outcome of the 'live' brief or design competition.

Any physical work related to the Design Project is submitted to the student's Course Leader.

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
1. Develop and create a major project proposal to a professional standard that is informed by relevant research and speculation on new and effective approaches to design and that is informed by theoretical and contextual knowledge Formative: Individual presentation of Major Project proposal at tutorial, seminar and critique. Summative: The completed Major Project Proposal in written form, and supporting visual summary, evidenced in seminar and critique sessions.
2. Demonstrate through professional competitions and /or ‘live' project work the engagement with real-world collaboration/contexts and collaborative working Formative: Individual presentation of Design project folder development at tutorial, seminar and critique. Summative: The completed design project folder and visual summary, evidenced in seminar and critique sessions.
3. Evidence through project work and Major Project proposal the understanding of relevant and sustainable career and personal development plans Formative: Individual presentation of Major Project proposal at tutorial, seminar and critique. Summative: The completed Major Project Proposal in written form, and supporting visual summary, evidenced in seminar and critique sessions.
4. Engage in the critical reflection of own work, group work and in peer review related to the development of the major project proposal and module project work, employing skills of evaluation, contextualization and communication. Formative: Individual presentation of project folder development at tutorial, seminar and critique. Summative: The completed Project Folder 1, in written form.

Elements of Assessment

Description of Assessment Definitive UNISTATS Categories Percentage
Project Folder 1: Major Project Proposal (1000 words and visual summary) Coursework 40%
Critical Reflection (500 words) Coursework 10%
Project Folder 2: Design Project and Visual Summary Coursework 50%
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any element of assessment is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module.

Bibliography core texts

Brown, T. (2009) Change by Design: How Design Thinking Creates New Alternatives for Business and Society. Collins Business.

Heller. S. and Talarico (2011) The Design Entrepreneur. Rockport

Perkins, S. (2006) Talent is not Enough: Business secrets for Designers. AIGA

Potter, N. (2002) What is a designer: things, places, messages. Hyphen Press

Bibliography recommended reading

Best, Kathryn (2006) Design Management: Managing Design Strategy, Process and Implementation. ava academia

Clarke, Michael (2007) Verbalising the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words. ava academia

Collins, Hilary (2010) Creative Research: The Theory and Practice of Research for the Creative Industries. ava academia

Fuad-Luke, A. (2009) Design Activism: Beautiful strangeness for a sustainable world. London: Earthscan.

Mau, B. (2004) Massive Change: A Manifesto for the Future Glo­bal Design Culture. Phaidon

Parsons, Tim. (2009) Thinking: Objects.  Contemporary approaches to product design. ava academia

Southon, M., and West, C. (2002) The Beermat Entrepreneur, Pearson, Harlow

Thackara, J. (2015) How To Thrive In The Next Economy: Designing tomorrow's world today. London: Thames & Hudson.

Yee, J., Jeffries, E. and Tan, L. (2013) Design Transitions: Untold stories on how design practises are transitioning. Amsterdam: Book Industry Services (BIS).

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