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Global Terrorism and Transnational Crime

  • Module code: CM6017
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: Year 6
  • Credits: 30.00
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

The aim of the module is to introduce you to relevant issues within the realm of globalisation, terrorism and transnational crime: eg. terrorism, environmental crime, piracy, human trafficking, criminal networks and cybercrime. It will enable you to develop a detailed comprehension of the complexity of these criminogenic experiences.

In the first part of the course, the module focuses on terrorism. It will be introducing students to a range of complex historical, political and social factors that have contributed to the articulation of terrorist practices. Students will have a chance to engage in the understanding of the reasons why certain practices emerge, the interaction between terrorist discourses and the media and how international law enforcement bodies work and interact.

The second part of the module will present a critical overview of different organised and transnational crimes. Students will be offered a chance to explore the articulation, social control and impact of organised criminal behaviour at an international level. Students will understand the links between terrorist practices and other organised crime (eg. cybercrime or trafficking of humans).

Aims

  • To introduce students to the study of terrorism and other transnational crimes;
  • To allow students to develop a critical understanding of international crime and its agents;
  • To investigate how globalisation affects the articulation of criminal behaviour at an international level;

Learning outcomes

On completion of the module, students should be able to:

1. Understand the complexity of policing, controlling and understanding crime at global level;

2. Demonstrate a critical and informed understanding of the origins, nature and development of terrorism;

3. Familiarise themselves with different types of transnational crime;

4. Comprehend the extent and impact of international crime;

5. Demonstrate a capacity for selection of appropriate materials for the construction of academic arguments and engage with material at a critical level.

Curriculum content

First block: State crime and Terrorism

- Globalisation and Crime: defining the concept of globalisation and assessing how it favours the widespread and sophistication of criminal practices.

- Introduction to Comparative Criminology: exploring the elements that should be considered in order to develop a better understanding of crime at an international level; investigating the merits of both comparative analysis and longitudinal studies.

- State Crime: discussing who can/should be held responsible of criminal behaviour when crime is somehow associated to the State.

- Terrorism: introducing its definition and exploring its historical origins; critically investigating religious and political terrorism; exploring the relationship between terrorism and media (eg. social networks, videos, recruitment of young people, etc.).

 The first block functions as a background for the second block.

 Second block: cybercrime and transnational crime

- Cybercrime: examining the emergence and extend of cybercrime; exploring the challenges involved in tackling this problem; discussing the representation of hackers (eg. Anonymous).

- Green criminology: exploring what constitutes green crimes and their victims; introducing different environmental disasters and how states dealt with them.

- Italian Mafia and criminal networks: introducing different Italian criminal networks; discussing how they operate and affect both politics and the environment.

- Human Trafficking and sex tourism: assessing the relationship between gender and globalisation; exploring the problems involved with investigating these types of criminal practices; discussing the issues of slavery and commodification of sex.

- Pornography: critically examining and deconstructing the definition of pornography; considering and contextualising different materials; exploring the challenges that this

- Maritime piracy: exploring a wide range of theoretical approaches to piracy; investigating the modus operandi of pirates; discussing the links between maritime piracy and terrorist practices.

Teaching and learning strategy

A combination of structured presentations (formal lectures), reading prior to class, small groups presentations and symposium style lessons have been selected for this module.

- Structured presentations: this format will enable students to familiarise themselves with relevant theories and approaches; this will also allow students to have a structure and point of reference for their independent study.

- Symposium: this format will encourage students to interact with both lecturer and topic; students can ask questions or offer their insights. This should stimulate discussions and reflection.

- Reading prior to class: students will have a chance to have some background information prior to attending the class; this should enable them to follow the class more easily.

- Small group presentations: these should encourage students to engage critically with the topic; students can choose the presentation topic according to their research interests.  

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive KIS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching Seminar/Workshops 66
Guided independent study 234
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

These assessment strategies have been designed to encourage students to critically explore various lines of research in international crime. The aim is to allow students to develop both theoretical and research skills.

Essay: it allows students to analyse and critically review the materials presented in class; it develops students' academic writing skills; it is a platform for students to provide their informed views on the subject;

Poster: it allows students to think about the topic in a structured and concise manner; it develops students' presentation skills and simplification processes (making the topic accessible to a wide audience).

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
Understand the complexity of policing, controlling and understanding crime at global level; Formative: debate and presentation Summative: poster and essay
Demonstrate a critical and informed understanding of the origins, nature and development of terrorism Formative: debate and presentation Summative: poster and essay
Familiarise themselves with different types of international crime Formative: debate and presentation Summative: poster and essay
Comprehend the extent and impact of international crimes Formative: debate and presentation Summative: poster and essay
Demonstrate a capacity for selection of appropriate materials for the construction of academic arguments and engage with material at a critical level. Formative: debate and presentation Summative: poster and essay

Breakdown of Major Categories of Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment Name Assessment Weighting
CWK Essay 65
CWK Poster Presentation 35
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any major assessment category is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module

Bibliography core texts

 Albanese, J. (2014) Transational Organized Crime. London: Sage

 Martin, A. (2015) Understanding Terrorism. London: Sage

 Von Lampe, K. (2015) Organised Crime. London Sage

Bibliography recommended reading

Alexander, Y. (ed) (2002). Combating Terrorism. University of Michigan Press

Anderson, M. (1996) Policing the European Union. London: Clarendon

Barak, G. (2000) Crime and Crime Control: A Global View. London: Greenwood Press

Bailey, D. (1991) Forces of Order: Policing in Modern Japan. Berkley: University of California Press

Berdal, M. (2002) Transnational Organized Crime and International Security: Business as Usual? Lynne Rienner

Bergalli, R. and Sumner, C. (1997) Social Control and Political Order. London Sage

Booth, K. & Dunne, T. (eds) (2002). Worlds in Collision: Terror and the Future of Global Order. MacMillan

Castells, M. (1997) The End of the Millennium, The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture. Vol. III. Oxford, UK: Blackwell

Dershowitz, A,M. (2002). Why Terrorism Works: Understanding the Threat, Responding to the Challenge. Yale University Press

Jewkes, Y. and Yar, M. (2009) handbook of Internet Crime. Collum: Willan

Lee, M. (2007) Human Trafficking. Collum: Willan

Passas, N. (1999) Transnational Crime. Aldershot: Ashgate

Prunckun, Henry W., Jr. (1995) Shadow of Death: An Analytical Bibliography on Political Violence, Terrorism, and Low-Intensity Conflict. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press

Reich, W (ed) (1998). Origins of Terrorism: Psychologies, Ideologies, Theologies, States of Mind. Washington, D.C: Woodwrow Wilson Center Press

Rowland, D. et al. (2012) Information Technology Law. London: Routledge

Savona, E. (2014) Criminal Markets and Mafia Proceeds. Publisher Taylor and Francis

Shelley, L. (2010) Human Trafficking: A Global Perspective. Publisher Cambridge University Press

Sheptycki, J. and Wardak, A. (2004) Transnational and Comparative Criminology. London: Cavendish

Troyer, R. et al. (1989) Social Control in the Peoples Republic of China. London: Prager

Van Dijk, J. et al. (1990) Experiences of Crime across the World. Boston: Kluwer

Wallerstein, I. (1990) ‘Culture as the ideological battleground of the modern worlds-system'. Theory, Culture & Society, Vol. 7, No. 2, 31-55

Waltz, K. (1999) ‘Globalization and Governance'. Political Science and Politics, Vol. 32, No.4,693-700

Wardak, A. (2004) Crime and Social Control in Saudi Arabia' in Transnational and Comparative Criminology. London: Cavendish

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