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History Worklink

  • Module code: HS6006
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: Year 6
  • Credits: 30.00
  • Pre-requisites: Completion of L5 modules or equivalent
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

This L6 module is a special option, taken by students after consultation with the module leader, to whom they must apply in person prior to making their module choices for Level 6. Emphasising employability, it enables students to build on skills and knowledge already acquired in the course of their studies, especially through Historians Craft at Level 4 and Extended Essay/Research Project at Level 5. It enables them to further develop those skills and knowledge and in the process also acquire practical work experience. The module takes the form of an innovative combination of lectures/seminars, workshops and work placements within and outside Kingston University. The placement element of the module acquaints students with the varied ways in which historical knowledge is applied beyond the environment of the university. In this module students learn about the ‘business’ of History, in the form of  institutional research projects and in the activities of archives and record offices. Students gain from experience and expertise built up over many years by the Centre for the Historical Record (CHR), which has undertaken pioneering work in the creation and dissemination of digitised historical records. The CHR offers practical work experience within the university. It also arranges placements at external history-related institutions with which it has developed excellent links over many years.

The module differs from many others in History at Kingston in that its theme relates not to particular historical events or people but to ‘Public History’ – in effect the ways in which history is understood and used in a public context, in the United Kingdom and other countries. Students learn about Public History in seminars. They choose a historical topic, related to the work of the institution where they undertake their placements. In workshops they discuss and reflect on Public History as practised at large and in their placement locations.

Aims

  • To familiarise students with the extent of the Kingston area’s historical resources;
  • To enable students to undertake practical work in a history-related institution, away from the lecture theatre and seminar room;
  • To enable students to understand, appreciate and reflect on the varied application of historical studies and knowledge, in places such as archives and record offices;
  • To provide students with understanding of Public History.

Learning outcomes

  • Describe and define the functions of their work placement institution;
  • Identify and describe the work of employees and other people (such as volunteers) within the institution;
  • Show the uses to which the institution puts historical information and knowledge;
  • Evaluate the significance of Public History in the work of the institution and more widely.

Curriculum content

  • Kingston as a place of historic interest and importance.
  • Kingston’s proximity to record offices, archives and other history-related institutions.
  • The application of historical knowledge and skills away from the university lecture theatre and seminar room.
  • The uses to which history is put, by and for the public.  
  • The history and future of Public History in the UK and elsewhere.
  • Historical skills and knowledge and the link to volunteering, employment and careers.

Teaching and learning strategy

Teaching and learning has three complementary elements: lecture/seminars, placements and workshops. Lecture/seminars provide background and contextual information about the way history is disseminated and used, especially through research projects – such as those of the Centre for the Historical Record – and through the activities of archives and record offices. This information provides an important basis for students’ understanding of Public History. Students also explore through seminar case studies debates about Public History, in the UK and other countries. Lecture/seminars also provide students with an introduction to their placement. They are allocated a placement at a history-related institution within or outside Kingston University. There they may work individually or as part of a team, on a project that may involve activities such as researching, cataloguing and helping to create or contribute to a historical database. In the process they learn about roles within the institution, how the institution functions and how it facilitates Public History. 

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive KIS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching 9 one-hour lecture/seminars 9
Scheduled learning and teaching 4 two-hour workshops 8
Study abroad / placement 8 five-hour placements 40
Guided independent study Guided independent study 243
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

Lectures/seminars facilitate information-sharing and discussion of placement activities and Public History. The module commences with three weekly one-hour lecture/seminars during the first three weeks of teaching block one. There will be opportunity for formative assessment, to gauge student knowledge and understanding of the module requirements. At the mid-point and end point of teaching block one a seminar will be scheduled ahead of a two-hour workshop. Workshops provide further opportunity for formative assessment and also peer learning, through the exchange of student information about placement experiences and about Public History. In teaching block two there are two lecture/seminars in the first two weeks and another seminar with workshop at the mid-point. Here students reflect on their learning (and on that of their peers) and rehearse their formative assignment strategies. Assessment takes the form of an essay and a presentation (either individually or in a group) to the module cohort. Essay and presentation focus on Public History, the placement institution and/or a project undertaken during the placement. Presentations take place during the module’s final seminar/workshop.     

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
Describe and define the functions of their work placement institution Assessed formatively through seminars and workshops and summatively through the end-of-module assignment
Identify and describe the work of employees and other people (such as volunteers) within the institution Assessed formatively through seminars and workshops and summatively through the end-of-module assignment
Show the uses to which the institution puts historical information and knowledge Assessed formatively through seminars and workshops and summatively through the end-of-module assignment
Evaluate the significance of Public History in the work of the institution and more widely Assessed formatively through seminars and workshops and summatively through the end-of-module assignment

Breakdown of Major Categories of Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment Name Assessment Weighting
PRC Presentation 20
CWK Essay 80
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any major assessment category is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module

Bibliography core texts

None

Bibliography recommended reading

Bowden, J (2008). Writing a Report. How-to Books. 

Fanthome, C (2004). Work Placements: A Survival Guide for Students. Palgrave Macmillan. 

Jordanova, L (2006). History in Practice. Hodder Arnold. 

Shindler D (2011). Learning to Leap: A Guide to being More Employable. Hot Hive Books.

Tosh, J (2008). Why History Matters. Palgrave Macmillan. 

Trought, F (2011). Brilliant Employability Skills. Prentice Hall.

van Emden, J and Becker, L (2010). Presentation Skills for Students. Palgrave Macmillan. 

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