Search our site
Search our site

MA Journalism Dissertation

  • Module code: JO7010
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: 7
  • Credits: 60
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

Students wishing to undertake a substantial piece of academic work can opt to take the dissertation module, which is carried out between May and September, after core teaching has finished. Once you have narrowed down your area of interest, you will be given a supervisor who will work individually with you to help you develop your ideas, frame a hypothesis and conduct appropriate primary and secondary research. The MA dissertation is a good bridge for any students wishing to pursue further study, at PhD level or beyond.

Aims

  • to undertake independent study and research on and relating to the news industry in order to address one or more focused questions
  • to produce a substantial piece of writing to an advanced academic standard
  • to present the findings of research in appropriate tone and depth
  • to build up analytical, professional and writing skills as well as original insight.

 

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module students will be able to:

  • identify a subject within journalism worthy of academic scrutiny;
  • devise and manage the production of a substantial piece of critical writing;
  • demonstrate an advanced competence in the research skills necessary for analysis of the industry;
  • produce a sustained piece of writing of advanced academic standard incorporating both exposition and argument.

Curriculum content

  • Methodologies and techniques for research
  • Ethics of research, data search, quantitative methods and interviewing
  • Writing up and submitting the final dissertation
  • Beyond this, after students have selected an appropriate research project in consultation with their supervisor, the curriculum will be defined by that area of study

 

Teaching and learning strategy

The module will be taught through five hour-long dissertation workshops in teaching block 2 covering the basics of the dissertation – from framing a research question(s), hypothesis and title to composing a dissertation proposal and researching and constructing the dissertation itself.  Later in the summer, there will be a workshop on writing up the dissertation.

Supervisors will be allocated after students have submitted a 500-word research proposal. Following this students and supervisors will arrange meetings as necessary but students will be expected to carry out a substantial amount of independent work.

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive UNISTATS Category Indicative Description Hours
Guided independent study independent study 595
Scheduled learning and teaching Workshops 5 hours
Total (number of credits x 10) 600

Assessment strategy

The assessment for this module is a 12,000 to 15,000 word dissertation, which will test students' abilities to research, structure and write a substantial critical thesis related to journalism. The dissertation must include an abstract, an extensive bibliography and a research report which demonstrates the character and depth of research undertaken. The title and structure, appropriate word length and conventions for the presentation of the piece must be approved in advance by the tutor.

 

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
Identify a subject within journalism worthy of academic scrutiny Proposal (formative); Dissertation(summative)
Devise and manage the production of a substantial piece of critical writing; Proposal (formative); Dissertation(summative)
Demonstrate an advanced competence in the research skills necessary for analysis of the industry; Dissertation
Produce a sustained piece of writing of advanced academic standard incorporating both exposition and argument. Dissertation

Elements of Assessment

Description of Assessment Definitive UNISTATS Categories Percentage
CWK Dissertation 100
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS a requirement that the major category of assessment is passed in order to achieve an overall pass for the module

Bibliography core texts

Wisker, G (2007). The Postgraduate Research Handbook: Succeed with Your MA, MPhil, EdD and PhD 2nd edition Palgrave Macmillan

 

Bibliography recommended reading

Becker, Lucinda (2004). How to Manage Your Postgraduate Course, Palgrave

Rudestam, K. E. and Newton, R.R. (2001). Surviving Your Dissertation: A Comprehensive Guide to Content and Process. 2nd ed, London, Sage

Find a course

Course finder

>
Postgraduate study
Site menu