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Policing and Punishment

  • Module code: CM5006
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: Year 5
  • Credits: 30.00
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

This module provides students with a critical insight into key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment.  It encourages students to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. The first part of the module is dedicated to developing understanding of the concepts of ‘policing' and the ‘police'. Key issues confronting contemporary policing are explored together with an enhanced awareness of the historical context within which contemporary policing has developed.

Debates about policing are situated within broader debates of social control and governance, with a critical appreciation of the police function and role. It also considers the implications of globalisation for policing both at an organisational and conceptual level. The second part of the module provides students with the opportunity to undertake a critical examination of contemporary debates on the purpose of punishment. Students will be introduced to a range of theoretical perspectives and debates on the use of punishment to address criminality and will consider the purpose of punishment in modern societies. This will be accompanied by an examination of different forms of punishment including an in-depth exploration of the use of imprisonment and comparative penal systems.

Aims

To enable students to: 

  • Develop a theoretical understanding of both policing and penology
  • Review the philosophical, historical and contemporary bases of policing and punishment
  • Foster a critical understanding of the concept of ‘justice' and its relation to social control and punishment
  • Identify and debate the key issues that confront contemporary policing and penal policy
  • Understand theories of punishment and evaluate the role and purpose of punishment in modern societies
  • Develop skills of independent and collaborative learning in both individual and group work
  • Develop strong research, analytical, writing and presentation skills
  • Be able to compare and contrast the range of different forms of punishment used by criminal justice systems.

Learning outcomes

To demonstrate:

  • A critical appreciation of contemporary  issues in policing and penology
  • A critical engagement with the theoretical underpinnings of both police and penal policy
  • Knowledge of the way in which police and penal policy impacts on practice
  • Critical reflection in developing alternative policing and penal provision
  • A broad base understanding of major debates in policing and penal policy in relation to the delivery of ‘justice'
  • Strong research, analytical, writing and presentation skills.

Curriculum content

  • History of contemporary policing
    • Police accountability and legitimacy
    • Police role and reform
  • Police Culture(s) and policing  ‘suspect' communities
  • Alternative forms of police governance – private agents
  • Policing the  ‘private' sphere
    • Policing ‘public (dis) order' 
  • Crossing borders - transnational policing
  • Theories of sentencing and punishment
  • Comparative penal policy and practice
  • The iconic status of the prison in the penal system
  • Punishment and the labour market – Rusche and Kirccheimer
  • Punishment and sensibilities – Norbert Elias
  • Punishment and discipline – Michel Foucault
  • Punishment and modernity

Teaching and learning strategy

This module will be taught through a combination of lectures, workshops  enabling students to gain both theoretical knowledge and policy knowledge  in the study of police and penal studies. This module will be taught through weekly one hour lectures and workshops. Lectures will identify the main issues and key concepts as set out in the curriculum. Weekly interactive workshops will enable students to discuss issues raised in the lectures and in directed readings. Student group presentations in workshops will be an opportunity to practice group work with a specific task-based outcome. Students will be required to actively participate in taught sessions, undertake tasks and discussions. Additional resources will be made available to students through Canvas.

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive KIS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching Lectures and workshops (3 hours x 22 weeks) 66
Guided independent study Reading, policy based research note taking, preparation of assessments (group work and independent preparation for seen exam) 234
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

There are two SUMMATIVE assessments for this module:

  1. Group presentation – proposal for change (30%)

This assessment allows students to develop their specific interest in a policy area in EITHER police or penal policy. Students will work together in small groups to develop a proposal for change. This will enable students to develop experience and confidence in a range of practical skills utilized in influencing policy change and communicating policy-making in an effective way to a range of audiences- informal feedback will be provided by peers and formal feedback by tutors. 

  1. SEEN Exam (70%)

Students will be assessed on the entire taught curriculum – ie, BOTH police and penal studies. It will also enable a more rounded engagement with both policy and theoretical elements of study. The SEEN element of the exam will provide students with ample opportunities to prepare for this level of engagement. 

 Formative exercises will be an inherent feature of the module and will be embedded into the workshop sessions where students will be set key tasks to prepare them for both the group presentation and exam. In preparing for group presentation (formative assessment 1) students will be asked to show evidence of group formation and progression in research for presentation. For seen exam (formative assessment 2) students are encouraged to attend a one to one tutorial with tutor to discuss exam essay plans.

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
1) A critical appreciation of the controversies in contemporary policing and penology SUMMATIVE: Group presentation & Seen Exam FORMATIVE 1 & 2
2) An awareness of the theoretical underpinnings of both police and penal policy SUMMATIVE: Group presentation & Seen Exam FORMATIVE 1 & 2
3) Knowledge of the way in which police and penal policy impacts on practice SUMMATIVE: Group presentation & Seen Exam FORMATIVE 1 & 2
4) Critical reflection in developing alternative policing and penal provision SUMMATIVE: Group presentation & Seen Exam FORMATIVE 1
5) Critical reflection in developing alternative policing and penal provision SUMMATIVE: Group presentation & Seen Exam FORMATIVE 1 & 2
6) A broad base understanding of major debates in policing and penal policy in relation to the delivery of 'justice' SUMMATIVE: Group presentation & Seen Exam FORMATIVE 1 & 2
7) Strong research, analytical, writing and presentation skills SUMMATIVE: Group presentation & Seen Exam FORMATIVE 1 & 2

Breakdown of Major Categories of Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment Name Assessment Weighting
EXWR Seen Examination Two Hours 70
CWK Group presentation 15 minutes 30
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It is NOT a requirement that the major category of assessment is passed in order to achieve an overall pass for the module

Bibliography core texts

Cavadino, M. and Dignan, J. (2010) The Penal System: An Introduction (4th ed.) London: Sage

Garland, D. (1990) Punishment and Modern Society: A Study in Social Theory,  Oxford: Oxford University Press

Leishman F, Loveday B. and Savage, S. (eds) (2000) Core Issues in Policing, Harlow: Pearson Education

Bibliography recommended reading

Ashworth, A. (2010) Sentencing and Criminal Justice (Law in Context) (5th ed.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Bauman, Z. (1989) Modernity and the Holocaust,  Cambridge: Polity Press

Foucault, M. (1991) (new ed.) Discipline and Punish, Harmondsworth: Penguin

Hughes, G. (2007) The Politics of Crime and Community, London: Palgrave

Loader, I. (2000) ‘Plural Policing and Democratic Governance', Socio-legal Studies, 9(3) 323-45

Macpherson, Sir W. (1999) The Stephen Lawrence Inquiry: Report of an Inquiry by Sir William Macpherson of Cluny, CM 4262-1, London HMSO

Rowe M. (2007) ‘The Scarman Inquiry' in Newburn T and Neyroud P (eds.) Dictionary of Policing, Cullompton: Willan

Wakefield, A. (2004) Selling Security: The private policing of public space Cullompton: Willan

Wakefield, A. and Fleming, J. (eds)(2009) The Sage Dictionary of Policing, London: Sage

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