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Supply Chain & Logistics Management

  • Module code: BO7665
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: 7
  • Credits: 15
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

This module aims to develop your ability to understand how to plan, implement and control the most effective and efficient flow of products and services. This module will help you develop decision making skills in the structuring of strategic and tactical options for organisations engaged in various supply chain and logistics activities. Class will be delivered by the combination of lecture, discussion of case studies, and students' presentations. This module considers how the theoretical aspects and methodologies of logistics and supply chain management can be applied into the real life practices. This module will be assessed through group presentation and individual assignment. Formative feedback on how well you do this will be provided in class.

Aims

  • Develop an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques associated with supply chain and logistics management.
  • Provide students with coherent perspective on logistics from raw materials through production to the end customer.
  • Enable students to develop and apply effective supply chain and logistics strategies when operating domestically and internationally.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  • Critically apply fundamental supply chain and logistics theories and concepts to organisations operating domestically and/or internationally with regard to supply and demand-side logistics.
  • Critically appraise supply chain and logistics problems facing organisations and using various appropriate models and concepts introduced in the module develop strategies for achieving logistic solutions.
  • Formulate and develop persuasive arguments with regard to the implementation of logistics in business.
  • Further develop research, written and communication skills to a professional standard.

Curriculum content

  • Introduction to supply chain and logistics management
  • Logistics functions: procurement, warehousing, inventory, and transport
  • Measuring performance in supply chain
  • Supply chain risk management
  • Logistics service providers and intermediaries
  • Global supply chain management systems
  • International shipping and port management
  • Terms of sales, payment, trade documentation, and insurance

Teaching and learning strategy

The teaching sessions will introduce students to the core principles and concepts of supply chain and logistics management to provide them with a foundation for analysis and application. Classes will be highly interactive with a view to engaging students in developing and applying theoretical concepts to practice. This will be done in a variety of ways such as the use of case studies and examination of real life supply chain and logistics problems. Students will be expected to participate in all classes by presenting material for discussion and debate. The module is supported by an electronic learning management system where students will be expected to access learning materials. In addition to class contact time, independent study time will include directed reading, independent research, project work and class preparation. Formative feedback will be given to students in these lectures to help them understand how well they have applied concepts and ideas, suggest how they can do this more effectively in the future.

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive UNISTATS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching Lecture 32
Guided independent study 118
Total (number of credits x 10) 150

Assessment strategy

Every session will provide ample opportunities for practice and formative feedback. The student will analyse case studies, articles, and business-related problems both individually and in groups, and will receive feedback from both their peers and the academic delivering the session.

The assessment consists of two major elements: (i) a practical exam in the form of a group presentation, and (ii) coursework in the form of an individual assignment. The group presentation involves students researching and critically evaluating impacts of contemporary development in supply chain and logistics. Individual assignment involves selecting an organisation and conducting primary research (by interviewing managers, employees and customers, and visiting operations/facilities to observe how they operate) to identify the logistics related problems that the organisation faces, analyse why the problems occur, and make recommendations to rectify these problems.

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
1) Critically apply fundamental supply chain and logistics theories and concepts to organisations operating domestically and/or internationally with regard to supply and demand-side logistics. Group Presentation Individual Assignment
2) Critically appraise supply chain and logistics problems facing organisations and using various appropriate models and concepts introduced in the module develop strategies for achieving logistic solutions. Group Presentation Individual Assignment
3) Formulate and develop persuasive arguments with regard to the implementation of logistics in business. Group Presentation Individual Assignment
4) Further develop research, written and communication skills to a professional standard. Group Presentation Individual Assignment

Elements of Assessment

Description of Assessment Definitive UNISTATS Categories Percentage
Group Presentation Practical exam 30%
Individual Assignment Coursework 70%
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any element of assessment is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module.

Bibliography core texts

Murphy, P and Wood, D. (latest edition) Contemporary Logistics, Pearson.

Bibliography recommended reading

Books:

Bowersox, D. J., Closs, D. J. & Bixby Cooper, M. (latest edition), Supply Chain Logistics Management, McGraw-Hill.

Branch, A (2007) Elements of Shipping, (latest edition), Routledge.

Coyle, J. J., Bardi, E. J., and Langley, C. J. (latest edition) The Management of Business Logistics: A Supply Chain Perspective, South Western College Publishing.

Gourdin, K. N. (2006) Global Logistics Management: A Competitive Advantage for the New Millennium, Blackwell Publishing.

Grant, D., Lambert, D., Stock, J., and Ellram, L. (2006) Fundamentals of Logistics Management, European Edition, McGraw Hill.

Mangan, J., Lalwani, C., and Butcher, T. Javadpour, R. (latest edition) Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management, John Wiley & Sons.

Stopford, M (latest edition) Maritime Economics, Routledge.

Waters, C. D. J. (latest edition) Supply Chain Management: An Introduction to Logistics, Palgrave Macmillan.

Articles:

Allbright, D. (2009) Transportation management's role in supply chain excellence, Supply Chain Management Review, 13(7): S52-S62

Busse, C. et al. (2016) Supplier development for sustainability: Contextual barriers in global supply chains, International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 46(5): 442-468.

Buxey, G. (2006) Reconstructing inventory management theory, International Journal of Operations & Production Management, (25)9: 996-1012.

Christopher, M. (2000) The agile supply chain: Competing in volatile markets, International Marketing Management, (29)1: 37-44.

Finch, P. (2004) Supply Chain Risk Management, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, 9(2): 183-196.

Lambert, D., Cooper, M., & Pagh, J. (1997) Supply Chain Management: More than a new name for logistics, International Journal of Logistics Management, 8(1): 1-14.

Mangan, J., Lalwani, C., & Fynes, B. (2008) Port-centric logistics, International Journal of Logistics Management, 19(1): 29-41.

Meixell, M. & Norbis, M. (2008) A review of the transportation mode choice and carrier selection literature, International Journal of Logistics Management, 19(2): 183-211.

Skjoett-Larsen (2000) Third party logistics - from an interorganizational point of view, International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 30(2): 112-127.

Trent, R. & Monczka, R. (2003) International purchasing and global sourcing - what are the differences?, The Journal of Supply Chain Management, 39(4): 26-36.

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