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Violence, Transgression and Society

  • Module code: CM4004
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: Year 4
  • Credits: 30.00
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

Violence, Transgression and Society explores who is policed and disciplined in societal, popular and political cultures. It thinks about why some people and their behaviour are seen as especially threatening and transgressive, while others are not. It explores which forms of behaviour have historically been characterised as dangerous or unacceptable and charts the ways in which those people and behaviours have been governed through both the institutions of the state and popular culture. The module explores the relationship between these responses and historical and social context, geographical location and intersections of social identity, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, faith and age.

 

Teaching Block 1 focuses on one of the forms of transgression about which most people are currently most anxious: violence. The module traces the history of violence through the lens of the ‘civilizing process’, subjecting this idea to critical scrutiny. We will examine the historical use of violence as a form of social control and the increasing problematisation of violence in the modern period. We follow this by looking at the ways in which people have responded to violence and subject the ideas of social control and social discipline to critical scrutiny. In Teaching Block 2 we move on to examine ideas of the ‘underclass’ and the intellectual heritage of the ‘dangerous classes’. Students will learn about the relationship between social control and social policy, particularly relating to ‘problem families’, homelessness and worklesness.

Throughout the module, the question of who is policed, how and why, is explored through national and global real-world events and case-studies. Students bring academic knowledge to real-world events and issues in weekly interactive workshops and individual and collaborative module assessment. The academic and professional abilities that students develop on this module are academic writing, group work and presentation skills.

 

Aims

  • Introduce students to social policing and discipline in historical and contemporary society towards violence and transgression.
  • Introduce students to responses to violent and transgressive people by societal, popular and political cultures.
  • Introduce students to the idea of contested and constructed concepts through a focus on violence and transgression.
  • Understand how academic knowledge can be used to analyse and communicate real-world issues and events through collaboration and group work, and oral presentations.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to

  • Understand the idea of socially, culturally, politically, geographically and historically situated responses to transgressive and violent behaviour and people.
  • Understand different constructions of transgression and violence.
  • Identify the ways that different policies, organisations and societies are engaged with the social discipline of transgressive and violent behaviour and people.
  • Evaluate the construction and regulation of transgressive and violent behaviour and people, as global social phenomena, and as linked to questions of social identity.
  • Analyse real-world social problems and ‘problem people’, and the responses to these, using theoretical and conceptual academic knowledge.
  • Understand how academic knowledge can be used to analyse and communicate real-world issues and events through collaboration and group work, and oral presentations.

 

 

 

Curriculum content

  • The history of violence and the ‘civilizing process’
  • Measurement of violence and public anxiety
  • Social control and social discipline
  • The relationship between social control and intersections of identity: gender, race, class, faith and sexuality.
  • Migration
  • Social policy, homelessness and social housing
  • Welfare and worklessness
  • State power and institutions
  • Popular culture, ‘lifestyle’ and social order
  • Anti-social behaviour

Teaching and learning strategy

The module will be delivered via weekly three hour-long workshop sessions, led by an academic staff member. These sessions bring together the tradition of a lecture format with the interactive potential of seminar sessions. Workshops are supported by open-door sessions with teaching staff throughout the year and learners are encouraged to attend these on a regular basis.

Students are introduced to what constitutes ‘opinion’ in academic thinking and writing. This will support students’ transition into higher education and develop critical thinking skills relevant for their degree programme. It will be especially useful as students come to evaluate and analyse the sorts of controversial and contested issues and events that are a key feature of the module.

Workshops are also supported by information about available resources, which enable students’ ability to engage with the summative assessments of the module, as well as academic reading and writing. Resources and relevant learning materials will be made available via ‘Studyspace’, located in the module handbook and ‘signposted’ in workshop sessions. Resources will include digitised reading materials, use of virtual space ‘My Reading Lists’, lecture slides and templates and guidance for formative and summative assessments. All learning outcomes will be achieved via guided independent study, primarily reading and substantive learning in the weekly workshops.

The formative assessments in each teaching block will be used to provide a ‘mock’ experience of group presentations. This will allow academic staff to give students feedback in preparation for their summative assessments. It is a ‘feed-forward’ opportunity for students.

 

 

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive KIS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching 21 workshops of three hours each 63
Guided independent study 237
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

Theassessmentstrategyinvolvesacademicwriting, groupworkandpresentationskills.

 

Summativeassessment 1:

 

1500 wordessay: 50% overallmodulemark.

 

Summativeassessment 2:

 

Grouporalpresentation, with the grade split between a group and an individual component: 50% overallmodulemark, 75% of this weighted to the group, 25% to the individual contribution.

 

 

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
Identify the ways that different policies, organisations and societies are engaged with the social discipline of transgressive and violent behaviour and people. Summative Assessment 1 Summative Assessment 2
Evaluate the construction and regulation of transgressive and violent behaviour and people, as global social phenomena, and as linked to questions of social identity. Summative Assessment 1 Summative Assessment 2
Analyse real-world social problems and ‘problem people’, and the responses to these, using theoretical and conceptual academic knowledge Formative Assessment 2 Summative Assessment 2
Understand how academic knowledge can be used to analyse and communicate real-world issues and events through collaboration and group work, and oral presentations. Formative Assessment 2 Summative Assessment 2

Breakdown of Major Categories of Assessment

Assessment Type Assessment Name Assessment Weighting
CWK 1500 word essay 50
PRC Group presentation 50
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any major assessment category is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module

Bibliography core texts

Core Text(s):

Burney, E. (2009) Making People Behave, London, Willan

Welshman, J (2013) Underclass, London, Bloomsbury

Young, J (1999) The Exclusive Society, London, Sage

Bibliography recommended reading

Patel, T. and Tyrer, D. (2011) Race, Crime and Resistance, London: Sage

Pearson, G (1983) Hooligan, A History of Respectable Fears, Basingstoke, Macmillan

Squires, P (eds.) (2008) ASBO Nation; the criminalization of nuisance, Bristol: Policy Press

Tyler, I (2013) Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain, London: Zed Books

Waquant, L (2009) Punishing the Poor, New York, Duke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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