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Mr Chukwuma Jude Menkiti

Research project: Gonorrhoea antibiotic resistance, genomic changes, and evolution

Abstract

The emergence of drug resistance among bacterial, viral and protozoan sexually transmitted infections (STI) in recent years threatens to undermine global sexually transmitted infections control programmes. Antimicrobial resistance is resistance of an organism to an antimicrobial drug that was originally effective for treatment of infections caused by it (Fluit et al. 2001). The resistant micro-organisms are able to withstand attack by the antimicrobial drugs thereby making the standard treatment ineffective and the infection persistent increasing the risk of spread to others.

Antimicrobial resistance is fast becoming the greatest global threat. New resistant mechanisms emerge and spread globally. Patients with infections caused by drug resistant bacteria are generally at increased risk of worse clinical outcomes and death and consume more health-care resources than patients infected with the same bacteria that are not resistant (Byarugaba 2005). For example: treatment failures have been reported in 10 countries due to resistance of treatments of last resort for gonorrhea (3rd generation cephalosporin). This is a warning sign because gonorrhea may soon become untreatable as no vaccines or new drugs are in development. Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat because:

·         It kills

·         It hampers the control of infectious diseases

·         It increases the costs of health care

·         It jeopardizes health care gains to society

·         Present situation

WHO reported in their 2014 global surveillance that antibiotic resistance is no longer a prediction for the future, but a threat living with us now which if no urgent, coordinated action is taken, the world is heading towards a post antibiotic era in which common infections and minor injuries which were once treatable over the decades can now become lethal.

  • Research degree: PhD
  • Title of project: Gonorrhoea antibiotic resistance, genomic changes, and evolution
  • Research supervisor: Dr Lori Snyder
  • Other research supervisor: Professor Mark Fielder

Biography

A  hardworking, valuable, trustworthy and ambitious  laboratory analyst with drive and energy to achieve maximum potential and a positive learning attitude.  Creative and proactive researcher experienced working independently. Ability to meet deadlines and accurate recording, analysis and Laboratory skills. Teaching experience with students and some PhD informal supervision. Good research skills, resourceful, dedicated and a positive attitude towards work with an impressive academic background in biomedical science and an array of clinical skills. Able to thrive in highly pressurized and challenging working environments.

A highly motivated worker seeking a PhD research course in the area of Microbiology and genetics, most especially in disease/infection pathology, diagnosis,  improving diagnosis/treatment and preventive etc This is to enable me to utilize, develop  and perfect my skills, abilities and experience to make a telling contribution to the research world.

Areas of research interest

  • BACTERIOLOGY
  • MICROBIOLOGY
  • BIOMEDICINE
  • PUBLIC HEALTH
  • COMMUNITY HEALTH
  • GENETICS
  • MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
  • ANTIBIOGRAM
  • PATHOLOGY

Qualifications

  • MSc Biomedical Sciences UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON
  • Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science MADONNA UNIVERSITY, NIGERIA
  • West African Senior School Certificate ST CHARLES SPECIAL SCIENCE SCHOOL, ONITSHA, NIGERIA
  • Junior Secondary School Certificate CHRIST ROYAL SECONDARY SCHOOL, IHIALA, NIGERIA
  • First School Leaving Certificate EZIANI PRIMARY SCHOOL, IHIALA, NIGERIA

Funding or awards received

  • ONE YEAR PhD BURSARY AWARD, KINGSTON UNIVERSITY
  • BEST GRADUATING STUDENT 2010 SET MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
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