Children's Nursing MSc

Why choose this course?

This course provides you with theoretical knowledge and practical experience needed to register as a children's nurse with the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

Children's nurses provide care for children and young people from birth to 18 years of age across settings, for example hospital, home and hospice. The role of the children's nurse includes promoting health and minimising illness in collaboration with families. When providing nursing care for children, working with the family and consideration of their needs is essential.
Children's nurses work collaboratively with a range of professionals to meet the specific needs of children, young people and their families wherever they are cared for.

Within our state-of-the-art simulation suites, our children's nursing students can further develop the skills required to care for children and families in a safe environment, which closely mimics a health care environment (hospital and home). Family role players are central to this learning experience.

You will have a diverse range of quality placements where you will develop your nursing skills under the supervision of supportive practitioners.

You will have the opportunity to take a national or international elective module at the end of your first year.

NHS Training Grant 

Nursing students on pre-registration courses from September 2020 will receive a payment of at least £5,000 a year which they will not need to pay back, subject to eligibility criteria. For more information please visit the NHS Business Service Authority.

UCAS code Mode Duration Attendance Start date
B733 Full time 2 years Classroom based and clinical placements September 2021
Location Kingston Hill

2020/21 entry

If you are planning to join this course in the academic year 2020/21 (i.e. between August 2020 and July 2021), please view the information about changes to courses for 2020/21 due to Covid-19.

 

Continuing students

Students who are continuing their studies with Kingston University in 2020/21 should refer to their Course Handbook for information about specific changes that have been, or may be, made to their course or modules being delivered in 2020/21. Course Handbooks are located within the Canvas Course page.

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • We are No. 1 for Nursing and Midwifery in London (Guardian University League Tables 2020).
  • Our award-winning simulation suite offers a wide range of realistic environments to learn in. These include hospital wards and community settings, with infant, child and young people manikins.
  • 100% of students from this course are in employment or further study six months after graduating (DHLE 2016/17).

What you will study

The first year is divided into two parts. In part one you will undertake a bridging module introducing you to the foundations of nursing and healthcare. In part two you will look at the context of nursing within a variety of client groups within your specific field of nursing. General nursing topics are studied alongside subjects tailored to children's nursing.

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Year 1 (parts one and two)

Year 2 (part 3)

Core modules

Foundations of life sciences for graduates

15 credits

This module is a core requirement for all students on the MSc Nursing course. It explores the foundations of human anatomy and physiology, including the body's systems, mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis, genomics and human development across the lifespan. Selected pathophysiology will be introduced in relation to commonly encountered health conditions and students will also begin to develop their knowledge of pharmacological concepts relating to nursing. This will provide students with key underpinning knowledge which will facilitate the exploration of person-centred assessment and care later in the programme.

Establishing the fundamentals of nursing care

30 credits

This module is a core requirement for all students on the MSc Nursing course. It introduces students to the fundamental principles of nursing and person-centred care, the determinants of health and well-being, compassionate communication and contemporary health policy. It enables the student to develop critical knowledge, skills and professional attitudes for the delivery of safe and effective person-centred care of individuals and their families or carers across a variety of settings. Students will begin to establish a sense of their nursing field identity but also that of other fields in order to promote effective interdisciplinary and integrated care.

Assessment and care process for acutely ill children

30 credits

This module enables students to assess, plan, implement and evaluate quality nursing care for children and young people with acute illness. The nursing care will be holistic in nature therefore covering physical aspects and addressing psychological, social and cultural needs of the child and family. Students will critically examine how care can be delivered in partnership with families and the interdisciplinary team. The care discussed will be based on best evidence and tailored to the individualised needs of the child and family.

Community and public health nursing for children

30 credits

This module explores local, national and global perspectives on contemporary and future public health issues related to caring for children and young people in community and other health, social care and education settings. Students develop their knowledge, skills and attitudes required to promote health and prevent ill health for children and young people in partnership with families and wider socio-political networks.

Introduction to professional practice

15 credits

This module will prepare the student for their role in practice. The focus is to introduce a range of nursing procedures to enable students to provide skilled, evidence-based, person-centred care to people at any stage of life who may have a range of physical, mental, cognitive or behavioural health conditions. It is a generic module where all fields of nursing are engaged with core nursing procedures as identified by the NMC Standards of Proficiency for Registered Nurses (NMC, 2018).

Developing professional practice

30 credits

This module will develop the skills taught and practised in the introduction to professional practice in Year 1. Students will be able to assess, plan and rationalise the nursing care they provide for people in health and social care and community settings. The emphasis will be on holistic person-centred care covering physical, psychological, social and cultural care. It will look at evidence-based, person-centred care being delivered inter- and intra-disciplinary.

Core modules

Safe and effective quality care in children's nursing

30 credits

This module will provide the children's nursing student with the theoretical knowledge and skills required for their future role as a qualified children's nurse when contributing to risk monitoring, quality care provision and optimised service improvements. The student will learn to manage and prioritise clinical actions, participate in clinical audit activities for quality and service improvements and learn to avoid compromising quality care using evidence-based knowledge and experience from practice. Regulations essential for maintaining safety at work and in different care environments will be covered. Students will learn about collaborative interdisciplinary working, whilst collectively developing effective improvement strategies. Some sessions will be shared across fields as they are core for all fields.

Coordinating the care of children with complex and palliative care needs

30 credits

This module will provide the student with the underpinning knowledge and skills required for their future leadership role in coordinating and managing the complex and palliative care needs of children in partnership with the family across a range of organisations and settings. Students will consider, where appropriate, the wishes of the child/families, their culture and the services available within the political landscape. The student will build on their knowledge of partnership and collaborative working and examine the cultural, political, psychosocial and technological influences on nursing care, resource management and finances.

Leadership in children's nursing

30 credits

Navigating the transition from student to a professional practitioner who is skilled at leading teams is critically important to the delivery of safe, effective and high quality health care. This module is designed to prepare the student for professional nursing practice by expanding their knowledge and skills to enable them to be an accountable and compassionate leader within the health and social care system. It focuses on leadership, team working, and performance management and enables the children's nurse to reflect on their transition to registered practice and build the evidence base for a career development portfolio. Some sessions will be shared across fields as they are core for all fields

Advancing professional practice

30 credits

This module advances the skills taught and practised in Year 1 in order to prepare students for their transition to working as a registered nurse. The module focuses on the assessment and management of patients with complex health care needs, working in partnership with other health care professionals. Students will integrate their clinical and communication skills with evidence based knowledge to become clinically proficient and confident nurses. It is a generic module where all fields of nursing learn with and from each other.

 

The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. The regulations governing this course are available on our website. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this may not be offered.

Entry requirements

Typical offer

  • Normally a health- or science-related at 2.2 or above completed in the last five years. Health- and science-related degrees could include health studies, psychology, physiology, biology, social sciences, or related studies.  
  • A minimum of 650 hours of health- or social care-related experience undertaken in the 12 months prior to your application. Applicants will be asked to complete an RPL (Recognition of Prior Learning) claim form to demonstrate this experience. This, along with a testimony, is a condition for entry to the programme.
  • You must have at least five GCSEs at grade 4 or above (or grade C or above for GCSEs taken before 2017), including English language and maths (and a science subject is preferred), or equivalent qualifications, together with evidence of academic study, ideally within the last five years.

Additional requirements

The UCAS personal statement must include:

  • how you have researched the profession of nursing;
  • examples of how you have worked with vulnerable people or worked in teams where you have developed skills which may be relevant to nursing;
  • how you have gained insight into the course e.g. open days, speaking to other people;
  • and your personal qualities which you feel are related to nursing.

International

Non-native speakers who do not have the equivalent of GCSE English at grade 4 (formerly grade C) or an equivalent (e.g. Functional Skills Level 2 Literacy) require an Academic IELTS score of 7.0 or equivalent overall and at least 6.5 in the writing section and at least 7 in the reading, listening and speaking sections.

Interview and selection

  • All suitable applicants are required to attend an interview and selection day. 
  • Interviews will be undertaken by academic members of staff, service users and service-side colleagues using the multi-mini interview technique (MMIs). MMIs are value-based short structured interviews that assess some of the NHS key values and attributes required for the course and the nursing profession. These are similar in format to the OSCEs used to assess practice elements of the programme. Kingston and St George's were the first university to introduce MMIs for nursing, which have now been adopted widely across the country. Research has shown that the MMIs have a higher level of validity in the offer making process than traditional interview techniques. 
  • During the day, you will also have an informal assessment of your current digital literacy skills, which provides us with a baseline to develop your digital skills during the course.
  • Candidates called for interview will also be required to sit a literacy test in the form of an essay.
  • Admission is subject to occupational health screening and an Enhanced Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) check, including checks against the Adult and Child Workforce Barring Lists, if you are offered and accept a place on the course.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching methods include lectures, clinical skills sessions, seminars, tutorials, workshops, guided study, field trips and independent project work. Kingston University has well-equipped simulation suites where you can use clinical equipment and practise on mannequins and teaching models. In addition, simulated events related to children's nursing. Our academic staff and simulation and skills team have won both national and university awards for their innovative simulations.

This course is split into 50% theory and 50% clinical practice.

Guided independent study

When not attending timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for exams. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS – the online virtual learning platform.

Support for postgraduate students

As a student at Kingston University, we will make sure you have access to appropriate advice regarding your academic development. You will also be able to use the University's support services

Your workload

.

Year 1 (part one and two)

Year 2 (part three)

Year 1 (part one and two)
  • Scheduled teaching: 207 hours
  • Guided independent study: 812 hours
  • Placement learning including skills: 875 hours
Year 2 (part three)
  • Scheduled teaching: 160 hours
  • Guided independent study: 630 hours
  • Placement learning including skills: 796 hours

Year 1

  • 57 % of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity (including placement learning).

Year 2

  • 60% of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity (including placement learning).

Contact hours may vary depending on your modules

How you will be assessed

Assessment methods include academic skills assessed by; essays, exams, posters and reports and clinical skills assessed in our simulation suites and by practice supervisors or assessors in practice placements.

The approximate percentage for how you will be assessed on this course is as follows:

Year one (part one and two):

  • 40% coursework
  • 40% practical exam
  • 20% written exam

Year two (part three):

  • 75% coursework
  • 25% practical exam

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Who teaches this course?

Our academic team of highly skilled nurses, lecturers and researchers are known for innovation in teaching and learning. Our award-winning simulation suites provide you with unrivalled opportunities to develop your skills in caring for patients and service users through highly realistic simulations and role play. You will also have opportunities to learn with and from other health and social care students.

Our team includes Professor Jayne Price, lead editor of Palliative Care for Children and Families, and editor of Essentials of Nursing Children and Young People.

The Children's Nursing Team recently published the Clinical Pocket Reference: Nursing Care of Children and Young People.

Our lecturers receive national and international awards for their excellence in learning and teaching.

Course fees and funding

2020/21 fees

Home and European Union 2020/21

MSc full time: £9,250

Overseas (not EU) 2020/21

MSc full time £15,000

Funding

Full-time students qualify for the same fee loan and living costs support as undergraduate students starting full-time higher education courses in 2019/20 by accessing loans from the Student Loans Company.

Visit our Fees and funding page to find out about the student funding options available to help you fund your postgraduate studies.

In addition, to support you while you are undertaking the clinical placement element of your studies, the government is providing non-repayable grants. The Learning Support Fund administered through the NHS Business Services Authority makes available: 

  • £1,000 Child Dependants' Allowance 

  • up to £3,000 for exceptional hardship 

  • reimbursement of additional travel and accommodation costs over normal daily travel to clinical placements. 

Information on NHS bursaries can be found on the NHS Business Services Authority website
 
Please note, you cannot apply for a pre-registration masters qualification in the same profession that you are already registered in, for example, if you hold a BSc Nursing in Adult Nursing, you are unable to complete an MSc Nursing in Mental Health. 

Discounts for Kingston University alumni

Kingston University is pleased to offer a 10% discount on full-time and part-time postgraduate degree course tuition fees (including PGCE courses) to our alumni. Visit our Alumni discount page to find out more.

International students

If you are an international student, find out more about scholarships and bursaries.

NHS Training Grant 

Nursing students on pre-registration courses from September 2020 will receive a payment of at least £5,000 a year which they will not need to pay back, subject to eligibility criteria. For more information please visit the NHS Business Service Authority.

Facilities

Kingston University's unique partnership with St George's, University of London (SGUL), means that health and social care students can access the combined resources of both Kingston University and SGUL.

As a student on this course, you will be based mainly at the Kingston Hill campus and will use the St George's campus for working in the anatomy laboratory.

Kingston University's Kingston Hill campus

Kingston University's Kingston Hill campus offers you modern facilities and include well-equipped laboratories where you can practise within a safe environment.

Our clinical skills laboratories house all the equipment needed to simulate clinical practice.

St George's, University of London campus

The St George's, University of London campus in Tooting is based alongside St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and offers you the specialist teaching environment of a medical school.

After you graduate

This course enables you to join as a registered nurse with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. Once qualified, you will have a range of employment opportunities in leading NHS and independent organisations. Staff development and continuing professional development programmes support and encourage life-long learning.

Continuing your professional development

Healthcare is constantly developing and advancing as the needs of the population change, more research evidence emerges and new technologies are created. Once you've qualified, it's important to keep up to date with current healthcare knowledge and practice. This will be required by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) and encouraged by your employer.

Today's NHS is going through a period of unprecedented change. Nurses are learning new skills and taking on more responsibility. The number of nurse-led specialist services is growing and nurses are playing a more active role in managing people's health and wellbeing, both in hospital and the community.

Specialist skills

There are many opportunities for nurses to advance their careers by developing specialist skills. These include clinical skills such as suturing, venepuncture, cannulation and prescribing, as well as running specialist nurse-led services in areas like diabetes drug and alcohol misuse and nurse-led services for older people.

New roles such as nurse practitioner and nurse consultant demand more advanced clinical and academic skills and provide further career development opportunities with salaries that reflect these specialist skills.

Teaching and mentoring

Qualified nurses play a major role in educating nursing students and training their own colleagues. Many find mentoring very rewarding and most will be involved in teaching and supervising students on practice placements. The lecturer practitioner role also allows nurses to combine an interest in teaching with hands-on practice.

Evidence-based practice

All modern nursing practice is evidence-based, applying clinical research findings to deliver the most suitable care to patients. Nurses are encouraged to reflect on their practice, undertake research, publish papers and speak at conferences and seminars. There are many examples of nurse-led research being used to change practice within clinical settings.

Management

Professional nurses today have management and leadership responsibilities and make a real contribution to changing the way services are organised and delivered.

Supporting your development

We offer a wide range of opportunities for continuing professional development and lifelong learning, including events and seminars, study days, short courses and qualifications at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Accreditation

This degree confers both an academic award and a professional qualification in nursing. On successful completion of the programme, you will be recommended to the Nursing and Midwifery Council for professional registration.

Links with the health sector

You will undertake clinical practice in a variety of NHS and independent sector organisations so that you can experience the full range of nursing within your chosen branch programme. Clinical specialists lead a significant number of our theory sessions, with service users and carers providing extra input.

Academic staff also liaise closely with NHS and independent sector organisations over learning and teaching, assessment and research.

Our clinical partners include:

Current research in this subject

Current research in this subject

Many of our staff in the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education are research active, often in partnership with NHS trusts. This ensures they are in touch with the latest thinking and bring best practice to your studies.

Research themes and programmes include:

  • Integrated and collaborative working and learning;
  • Implementation and Improvement;
  • Emergency, cardiovascular and critical care;
  • Psychological and Cognitive Conditions;
  • Education

Heritage 2 Health programme

Through our Heritage 2 Health programme, you will have the opportunity to work with professionals in the creative industries, helping to promote the best care for service users at heritage sites.

Changes to courses for 2020/21 due to Covid-19

Changes detailed here are for students joining this course in the academic year 2020/21 (i.e. between August 2020 and July 2021).

Course information (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Composition of the course

We do not anticipate making any changes to the composition of the course, i.e. number of modules or credits in a year, as a result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to courses as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to the composition of the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

The programme was revalidated in March 2020 and has a new title and new modules. Following revalidation, there are now two 15 credit modules in year one instead of one 30 credit module. This was updated on the university website on 1 July 2020.

Modules

We do not anticipate making any changes to module titles and summaries or to the availability of modules as a result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to modules as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to module titles and/or availability of modules will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Length of course

We expect to deliver the course within the planned timescales to enable successful students to progress through and graduate from the course without delay.

In exceptional circumstances the sequence of learning and teaching activities may be changed, e.g. re-sequencing those modules that can be delivered more effectively under the current restrictions with those which would be more difficult to deliver, such as practical modules and placements.

Entry requirements (changes for 2020/21 entry)

We have not changed entry requirements as a result of the pandemic. However, the range of accepted alternatives have increased as has the way in which we select students, which now includes virtual interviews and online portfolios.

Entry requirements for international students

We have not changed entry requirements for international students as a result of the pandemic. However, in response to the pandemic, we now accept a much broader list of English language exams for entry to the course; the level of these exams remain the same.

Teaching (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Changes to the way the course will be delivered

Due to the current pandemic the course's teaching and learning activities will be delivered through both online and on-campus methods (blended learning) in 2020/21. In order to provide all students with a comparable on-campus experience, the University has committed to ensuring that all courses provide at least 30% of their teaching and learning activities on-campus.

While physical distancing measures remain in place, you will receive your learning and teaching via a blend of on-campus and on-line activities. Should your circumstances prevent your attendance at on-campus sessions, you will still be able to engage with your course in a way that allows you to progress. Where this is not possible, support will be available to consider what options are open to you.

On-campus teaching will be delivered at Kingston Hill and other sites within Kingston. Students will receive details of where their on campus sessions will be delivered through their induction timetables. Any later changes will be communicated via email and sent as Canvas announcements.

Changes to teaching in the event of a further lockdown or adjustments in government advice

The University will continue to closely monitor government announcements and advice in relation to the current pandemic and, where required, will take any necessary action in order to comply with such advice.

In the event that a further lockdown is enforced the University will aim to deliver the course fully online. This may require some additional changes being made to planned teaching and learning activities, including assessments. The majority of our courses are prepared to be delivered fully online if the situation requires it. Where the quality of the student experience may be compromised significantly, or the course is unable to be delivered fully online, the University may need to suspend the delivery of that course until a time that it can be delivered appropriately. Students will be supported in these situations to ensure they are able to make the right choices for their particular circumstances.

In the event that the current social distancing restrictions are fully lifted and the University is able to resume normal delivery of teaching and learning activities, courses will assess whether it is in the students' interest to resume normal delivery. In some cases it may be better to continue and complete modules under the planned blended delivery mode.

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for Year 1

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours will not be made as a result of the pandemic. However, it is possible that some adjustments might be made at module level, e.g. a few more scheduled activities, in order to help ensure student engagement with blended learning.

The overall breakdown of scheduled teaching, placement and guided independent study hours is currently being updated to reflect the new curriculum validated earlier this year. Any changes made to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

'Scheduled teaching' includes teaching that is online either live or recorded / on demand.

Timetable

Your individualised timetable for teaching block 1 (i.e. from September 2020 to December 2020) should be available by the end of August 2020. Timetables for teaching block 2 (i.e. from January 2021) will not be available until the autumn. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 9pm. To accommodate smaller group sizes and social distancing, we will need to maximise the time available for teaching. This means, we may have to use Wednesday afternoons and enrichment week for additional teaching slots. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Class sizes

On campus classes will be delivered in smaller groups to enable social distancing.

Assessment (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Changes can be made to modules, including how they are assessed, as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our modules up to date with current developments in that subject area. Due to the current restrictions in place, i.e. social distancing, it is anticipated that many formal on-campus examinations, including practical examinations, will be replaced with alternative assessments which can be completed online. These changes will be considered and approved through the University's processes to ensure that student assessments will be able to demonstrate they have achieved the expected learning outcomes. The approval process will also assess whether the change impacts the status of any professional body accreditation the course benefits from.

Any changes to the overall methods of assessment for the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Staff (changes for 2020/21 entry)

No changes are expected to the general level of experience or status of staff involved in delivering the course.

As a result of the social distancing restrictions in place, on-campus teaching activities may need to be split into smaller groups which may require the support of teaching assistants and student mentors, who will be managed by experienced staff.

Fees, funding and additional costs (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Tuition fees

There will be no changes to published tuition fees for 2020/21.

Additional costs (e.g. field trips, materials, equipment, etc.)

As a result of the blended delivery of courses in 2020/21, where a significant proportion of the teaching will be done online, students will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online teaching and learning activities. Students who are able to travel will have access to computers on campus, however, it should be noted that access to on-campus facilities will be restricted due to social distancing requirements.

The University is considering how best to provide support to students who do not have access to suitable hardware and software requirements and access to the internet. Identifying students who require this type of support is an important milestone for the University in our journey to ensure equity of access while we continue to deliver our blended approach. Information about the support that will be available will be provided to students during the induction period.

Funding

There will be no changes to any existing University funding arrangements for 2020/21. Currently there are no indications from the UK government that there will be any changes to government funding arrangements.

Fees and funding for international students

There will be no changes to published tuition fees or funding arrangements specifically relating to international students for 2020/21.

Work placements and field trips (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Placements (including work and clinical placements) and field trips included as part of the course will go ahead as planned. However, to ensure students are able to gain maximum value from these activities, it may be necessary to reschedule them to later in the year when current restrictions have been lifted. We acknowledge that this year it may be more difficult for students to secure appropriate placements. In those situations, students will be guided and supported through the various options that will be available to them, including switching courses or interrupting their studies until a time when they can complete their placement.

Any proposed changes to placements or field trips would go through University's agreed processes where the impact of the change will be carefully considered. Students will be advised of any changes that may become necessary and appropriate support will be available to students to guide them through the various options that may be available to them.

Year one MSc students normally undertake an elective at the end of year one which can be national or international. A contingency plan is in place should travel abroad remain difficult. We will review prior to Christmas 2020 and students will be informed through the virtual learning environment and email.

Our placement providers listed on the course page are still valid. In the interest of the health and wellbeing of our students, the University will ensure that appropriate risk assessments are made before students are sent on a placement.

Courses which require placements or field trips to be completed in order to pass relevant modules will have contingency plans in place in the event that a placement or field trip cannot be completed due to another lockdown or more stringent social distancing measures.

Voluntary placements or field trips may be rescheduled, or, as a last resort, cancelled if it becomes difficult to deliver them and doing so is in the interest of the health and safety of our staff and students.

Award, qualification and accreditation (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Qualification

No changes will be made to the qualification awarded, e.g. MSc, as a result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to courses, including the qualification awarded (although very rare), as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area. Any changes made to the qualification awarded for the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Additional (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Variations to regulations or other specific requirements for this course

The Nursing and Midwifery Council implemented changes to their Standards and have retained some of these during the recovery period of the pandemic.

  • Theoretical instruction can be replaced with blended learning (mix of online and on campus delivery)
  • Additional risk assessments will be undertaken prior to students commencing practice placements to take account of current, relevant public health guidelines to ensure the health and wellbeing of individual students.

International students

International students should maintain awareness of the UK government's and their home country's government advice on possible travel restrictions. The University will closely monitor advice and guidance published by the UK government and assess its impact on our international students. Appropriate advice and guidance will be provided as and when required.

Students who are unable to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities

The University will ensure students who are unable to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities are able to effectively engage with their studies remotely. For certain courses an inability to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities may not be in the students best interest, as it may impede their chances of succeeding in the course or lead to them receiving a poor learning experience. In such cases students will be advised and guided through the various options available to them, such as deferring their studies until they can engage fully with the course.