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  • Development and International Economics MA

Development and International Economics MA

Why choose this course?

This MA focuses on the problems of economic development in the changing context of the international economic relationship. It will also provide a thorough grounding in macroeconomic and microeconomic analysis, in applied econometrics, in a range of approaches for dealing with economic policy issues, and in the long-term historical and conceptual context of contemporary debates in economics.

Lectures are supplemented by seminars, giving an opportunity for regular feedback and discussion.

The course aims to develop your skills in a direction that matches what many employers expect when hiring economists.

Mode Duration Start date
Full time 1 year September 2020
Part time 2 years September 2020
Location Penrhyn Road

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • This course has a pluralistic approach, with a balanced blend of development and growth theories, relevant case studies from all over the world and necessary empirical methods.
  • Economics Research Seminars (ERS) present up-to-date research from leading economists across the world. These sessions provide an extra dimension to your studies and you will also be encouraged to present your own research.
  • Kingston's Political Economy Research Group (PERG) holds conferences, coordinates research and encourages student participation.

What you will study

You will study core aspects of macro- and microeconomic theory, applied econometrics and economic policy. You will also gain in-depth knowledge of the theory and contemporary issues surrounding international trade, and of the problems that developing countries confront in dealing with the international economic environment. Such problems include trade and development, the effect of foreign direct investment (FDI) on development, and the significance of technology transfer.

The degree culminates in your dissertation, in which you will have the opportunity to carry out in-depth research into a contemporary issue dealing with developing countries, international trade and FDI. You will work with a member of the Economics department who specialises in and pursues research in this area

Core modules

Option modules

Core modules

Economic Change and Ideas

30 credits

This module develops an historical and analytical narrative of the transformation of economic life from the rise of capitalism and the first and second industrial revolutions to the emergence of the present day globalised and financialised world; it also presents parallel developments in the history of economic ideas. It gives you an opportunity to view the history of the last half millennium through the prism of industrial revolutions and economic crises and examines how, and how well, contemporaneous thinkers such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall and John Maynard Keynes dealt with these dramatic transformations in material life.

Macroeconomic Theory and Policy

30 credits

This module introduces you to macroeconomic theory and policy at an advanced level. The module first deals with the fundamental issues of demand, growth, unemployment and inflation in the context of classical and Keynesian approaches to understanding aggregate economic behaviour. The module then discusses selected issues in current economic policy and illustrates how different economic theories approach these issues, how economic models are applied to current problems and how different theories lend themselves to different policy conclusions. The topics covered will differ each semester but may well include issues such as unemployment, financial stability and the causes and effects of changes in income distribution.

Development and International Economics

30 credits

This module will approach problems of economic development in the context of the international economy. Developing countries, especially high growth emerging nations, have come to play an important part in global economy. Lower income countries also contribute to world economy as markets for industrial goods and suppliers of natural resources. The module will develop its main themes from a review of major theories of economic development, international trade and investment. It will focus on problems of economic development and the changing context of development under the influence of economic globalisation. Topics such as trade and development, the effect of foreign direct investment (FDI) on development and the significance of technology transfer will be prominent features of the module.

Economics Dissertation

60 credits

Each student completes a separate individual research project under the supervision of a member of staff. You may propose a title of their own or choose one in agreement with a member of staff. The main purpose of the project is to enable you to demonstrate knowledge of how economic ideas can be applied in greater length and depth than is feasible in the context of a taught course. Upon completion of the individual research project you will have designed and implemented a research project in applied or theoretical economics, normally including a critical literature survey and the evaluation of evidence (as appropriate to the project title). A workshop and supervisory meetings are provided to help you in their choice of title and to ensure progression of research.

EC 7011 provides opportunities for you to develop academic and professional working skills. The module contributes to key professional working and employability skills eg. working to deadlines; originality; writing coherently and analytically.

Modules

Financial Economics

30 credits

This module provides you with an understanding of the role of finance in the contemporary economic landscape, covering the central topics in modern, behavioural and critical financial theory. It explores the nature and the causes of modern financial innovation and the way it affects economic agents. It discusses proper policy responses and regulation that might tame financial instability and enhance economic growth. The breadth of student knowledge is expanded by consideration of empirical instances of the phenomena under investigation.

Applied Econometrics and Methods

30 credits

This first part of the module introduces a range of econometric methods from the perspective of their usefulness in refining and applying economic theory in the context of substantive economic problems. The module aims to develop your ability both to understand the analytical basis of these methods and to put them into practice in the context of empirical verification and economic policy decisions.

The second part of the module microeconomic analysis explores the theory of consumer and producer behaviour. It introduces game theory as an important framework for contemporary economic analysis. You will learn to manipulate theoretical models of microeconomic behaviour and apply them to the analysis of policy issues.

The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. The regulations governing this course are available on our website. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this may not be offered.

What our students say

Well organised and clear lectures...has helped to improve my knowledge on current macroeconomic issues and also on different views by various economists.

Former student

Very good course, good teaching... very well structured [class].

Former student

Application to the present economic environment.

Former student

Seminars allowed for smaller classes and more discussion, which I enjoyed.

Former student

Interesting subject and active classes where students are asked to participate.

Former student

Very important for my future career.

Former student

After you graduate

This Development and International Economics MA can lead to a range of career opportunities in the public and private sectors. These can include national and international government agencies and non-governmental organisations, as well as commercial organisations in sectors ranging from the City of London to trading and manufacturing businesses of all sizes.

Entry requirements

Typical offer

Second-class degree or above, in an appropriate subject.

International

All non-UK applicants must meet our English language requirement, which is Academic IELTS of 6.5 overall, with no element below 5.5. Make sure you read our full guidance about English language requirements, which includes details of other qualifications we consider.

Applicants who do not meet the English language requirements could be eligible to join our pre-sessional English language course.

Applicants from a recognised majority English speaking countries (MESCs) do not need to meet these requirements.

Teaching and assessment

Guided independent study

When not attending timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for exams. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the online virtual learning platform.

Support for postgraduate students

As a student at Kingston University, we will make sure you have access to appropriate advice regarding your academic development. You will also be able to use the University's support services

Your workload

12% of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity

Type of teaching and learning

Type of teaching and learning
  • Scheduled teaching: 208 hours
  • Guided independent study: 1592 hours

Contact hours may vary depending on your modules.

How you will be assessed

Assessment typically comprises exams (eg test or exam), practical (eg presentations, performance) and coursework (eg essays, reports, self-assessment, portfolios, dissertation). The approximate percentage for how you will be assessed on this course is as follows, though depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose:

Type of assessment

Type of assessment
  • Coursework: 78%
  • Practical: 6%
  • Exam: 16%

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Your timetables

Each student receives a personalised timetable. This is usually available after you have completed your online enrolment, which is typically accessible 1 month before the start of your course.

Class sizes

You will be part of an intimate cohort of students which supports dedicated academic guidance and advice and the opportunity to build a life-long network of colleagues. Some modules are common across other postgraduate programmes therefore you will be taught alongside students who are on these courses within the School.

Who teaches this course?

You will be taught by an experienced teaching team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on this course. The team includes senior academics and professional practitioners with industry experience. The following group of staff members are currently involved in the delivery of different elements of this course. This pool is subject to change at any time within the academic year.

Fees for this course

Home and European Union 2020/21

  • MA full time £8,190
  • MA part time £4,504

Overseas (not EU) 2020/21

  • MA full time £14,500
  • MA part time £7,975
Postgraduate study
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