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Migration and Social Transformation

  • Module code: SO6022
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: Year 6
  • Credits: 30.00
  • Pre-requisites: Sociological Approaches (SO5001) and succesful completion of level 5 sociology or equivalent
  • Co-requisites: None

Summary

Global migration has intensified rapidly since 1960, with the UNPD estimating an increase from 80 to 210 million by 2009. It has become a contentious political topic with far-reaching consequences for contemporary societies, and arguably for established sociological paradigms (e.g. methodological nationalism). The module will equip students to understand and investigate in depth the social dynamics of migration and its consequences, and enable them to offer informed and critical comment on contemporary debates (e.g. media coverage of migration, on the economics of migration, and on migration's consequences for social solidarity). It offers students the opportunity to build on interests and skills developed at Level 5 (e.g. in International Perspectives and Sociological Approaches), and broadens the department's offering at Level 6 to a new area of contemporary social relevance.

Aims

  • To develop knowledge of the main movements of migration since 1960, and of debates and theories concerning their causes and consequences
  • To develop an understanding of the social dynamics of contemporary migration at three levels or scales:
  • (i) macro (national and international structures and infrastructures);
  • (ii) meso (technologies of travel and communication, strategies and conditions of migration and settlement, political and social movements and networks),
  • (iii) micro (individual, household and community experiences, cultural production and representation of migrants' lives).
  • To develop knowledge of and a capacity to analyse and debate the consequences of migration for sending and receiving societies.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  • Describe and examine the main movements of human migration since 1960, and be able to
    outline and explain the major debates and theories of their causes and
    consequences.
  • Analyse the social dynamics of migration at macro, meso and micro scales
  • Compare different national approaches to immigration policy, migrant reception and integration, and use this knowledge to reflect on and evaluate the issues and problems involved in the use of comparison in sociology.
  • Examine and evaluate sociological accounts of the consequences of migration for sending and receiving societies using a range of relevant empirical studies.
  • Examine the range of research strategies used to
    investigate migration and its social consequences, and evaluate their
    strengths, weaknesses and limitations

Curriculum content

  • Movements and forms of migration in history and since 1960
  • Theorising migration: globalisation, transnationalism, diasporas, mobilities
  • Economic and social consequences of migration in sending and receiving societies
  • Immigration debates and policies in comparative perspective
  • Demographic consequences of migration – e.g. desecularisation of Western Europe
  • Technological factors and socio-cultural dynamics e.g. diasporic intensification
  • Methods used to investigate migration and its social consequences, e.g. ethnography, interviews, official statistics, surveys.

Teaching and learning strategy

This module will be taught via a series of 18 x 2 hour workshops, supported by an online forum/blog. The workshops will provide students with a structured introduction to the sociology of migration highlighting key concepts and debates, together with opportunities to discuss the ideas and issues raised in the material presented. The forum will provide the chance to clarify and extend learning, and to develop debates in more depth, clarify students' thinking, and develop debating skills. Additional information will be provided on Study Space to prepare for assessment, formative feedback will be provided on an essay plan prior to submission of the assignment.

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive KIS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching 18x 3 hour workshops 54
Guided independent study Reading, preparation for seminar exercises, blog participation and assessment 246
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

Students' learning will be assessed via a 500 word essay plan (formative), a 2000 word essay (summative), and a 2 hour seen examination (summative).

The assessment strategy is designed to enhance students' understanding of the relevance of sociological knowledge and its application, and develop the skills required to communicate this in a concise and professional manner. Students will be asked to evaluate their learning on the module and encouraged to prepare for the essay by way of an essay plan for which they will receive formative feedback.

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
Describe and examine the main movements of human migration since 1960, and be able to outline and explain the major debates and theories of their causes and consequences Exam (summative)
Analyse the social dynamics of migration at macro, meso and micro scales Exam (summative) Essay (summative)
Compare different national approaches to immigration policy, migrant reception and integration, and use this knowledge to reflect on and evaluate the issues and problems involved in the use of comparison in sociology Exam (summative) Essay (summative)
Examine and evaluate sociological accounts of the consequences of migration for sending and receiving societies using a range of relevant empirical studies. Essay (summative)
Examine the range of research strategies used to investigate migration and its social consequences, and evaluate their strengths, weaknesses and limitations Essay (summative)

Achieving a pass

It IS NOT a requirement that any major assessment category is passed separately in order to achieve an overall pass for the module

Bibliography core texts

Crepaz, Markus M. L. (2008) Trust beyond borders: immigration, the welfare state, and identity in modern societies (Ann Arbor, MI : University of Michigan Press).

Andersson, Rubens, (2014) Illegality Inc.: clandestine migration and the business of bordering Europe (Berkeley: California University Press). 

Bibliography recommended reading

Rosenblum,  Marc R. and Daniel J. Tichenor (2012) Oxford Handbook of the Politics of International Migration (Oxford: OUP). E-book

Squire, V ed.. (2011). The contested politics of mobility : border zones and irregularity (London : Routledge)

Panayiotopoulos,  Prodromos (2010)  Ethnicity, migration and enterprise (Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan)

Bauböck Rainer, (ed.) (2006) Migration and citizenship] : legal status, rights and political participation (Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press)

Vertovec, Steven (2010) Anthropology of migration and multiculturalism : new directions

(London : Routledge)

Caroline B. Brettell and James F. Hollifield. (2008) Migration theory : talking across disciplines   

(London : Routledge)

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