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The Practice of Representing Architecture

  • Module code: AR6003
  • Year: 2018/9
  • Level: 6
  • Credits: 30
  • Pre-requisites: None
  • Co-requisites: AR6001, AR6002, AR6004

Summary

Architecture embodies ideas about the world. In its many different forms, architecture interprets and represents the interactions and inter-relationships between a diverse range of physical, environmental, social and cultural factors. A beautiful or compelling project synthesises these into a coherent, spatial and experiential whole.

This module asks you to critique the ways in which an existing building encompasses such concerns, eloquently integrating primary experience with secondary research and visually representing this through an appropriate range of media, as an integral part of a dissertation capstone project. A successful design proposal represents the drawing together of a complex range of issues into a coherent, holistic work of architecture, described within a well presented and communicative portfolio.

A thesis design project is a design portfolio with a theoretical foundation that demonstrates a critical and individual line on inquiry that results in a unique architectural proposition. This capstone project is the culmination of learning throughout the course.

Aims

The aims of this module are:

  • To enable students to visually represent a building precedent, through the integration of primary experience and secondary research as part of a dissertation;;
  • To develop a student's critical attitude to both architecture and its presentation and communication;
  • To enable a student to resolve a complex design project formally, spatially, contextually and programmatically that represents a body of research.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical attitude towards architecture within a body of work;
  2. Produce an appropriate and eloquent visual record of a building precedent, as an integral part of the development of a Dissertation;
  3. Interpret the complex inter-relationships between a diverse range of issues and ideas which relate to architecture and to synthesise and communicate them through a coherent visual presentation;
  4. Resolve a complex design project;
  5. Demonstrate how a design proposal synthesises a wide range of physical, environmental, social and cultural factors, including context, programme, space, form, material, time and experience;
  6. Effectively communicate the ideas, strategies, character and inhabitation of a design project.

Curriculum content

  • Primary and secondary observation skill and research to support a dissertation thesis;
  • Appropriate visual representation skills to record a building precedent in support of a dissertation thesis;
  • The visual communication of a dissertation;
  • A personal approach to design and representation which explores and invents complex ideas and techniques;
  • Selecting appropriate techniques and media for the interpretation and representation of inter-related subjects;
  • Working at different scales and levels of detail simultaneously to produce a complete and coherent documentation of the project design thesis.

Teaching and learning strategy

The module has one supportive/contextual based element (Coursework) and two design based elements (Design Portfolio). The Coursework and the Design Portfolio parts of the course are taught in relation to each other through a combination of studio based projects, lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops and study visits.

The School employs various learning technologies to support the teaching and learning strategies. Canvas is used to support teaching and learning in all modules, and other aspects of the courses and School as a whole. It is used at a modular level as a repository for all module documentation, such as the module guide, briefs, lecture handouts, support material, and links to web-resources. It is also used for tutorial and workshop sign-up lists and discussion forums where appropriate.  Students should check this site on a daily basis.

All courses based in the Kingston School of Art offer students free access to the online video tutorial platform Lynda.com. This provides a wide range of subjects to choose from, many with downloadable exercise files, including software tutorials covering photography, graphics, web design, audio and music, CAD and Microsoft Office software, as well as courses on Business and Management skills. Some of these are embedded in the curriculum and offer additional self-paced learning, others may be taken at will by students wishing to broaden their employability skills in other areas.

Breakdown of Teaching and Learning Hours

Definitive UNISTATS Category Indicative Description Hours
Scheduled learning and teaching Studio-based projects, lectures, workshops, study visits, tutorials, seminars. 75
Guided independent study 225
Total (number of credits x 10) 300

Assessment strategy

Assessment for this module has three elements of assessment. The 'coursework' consists of one assessed element the 'Design Portfolio' consists of two assessed elements and these are 'Portfolio Assessment 1' and 'Portfolio Assessment 2'. 'Portfolio Assessment 2' is synoptically assessed across all 4 modules.

Within the coursework element feedback/feed forward is given in different forms depending on the nature of the work. There will, however, be the opportunity for at least one group or individual tutorial and formal written feedback following submission, within the prescribed timescale.

Within the Design Portfolio elements ie. in Studio the following strategies for feedback/feed forward apply:

  • Weekly tutorials, either group or individual as appropriate to the project stage
  • At least one formal presentation and review, with written feedback, within each teaching block
  • Formative feedback on a submitted portfolio at end of teaching block 1
  • Formal written feedback on a submitted portfolio at end of teaching block 2

Coursework Assessment (25%):

The assessment for the coursework element on this module is the survey drawings, consisting of a site plan, floor plans and the main elevation of the building with a drawing of a fragment of the building in relation to the dissertation.  This is reflected in Learning Outcomes 1-3 and will be assessed synoptically with the dissertation under AR6001.

Design Portfolio (75% in total):

The Design Portfolio consists of two elements and these are 'Design Portfolio Assessment 1' and 'Design Portfolio Assessment 2' which are reflected in Learning Outcomes 4-6. The assessment for the 'Design Portfolio Assessment 1' on this module is a portfolio of 2D and 3D representations that effectively communicate the ideas of the Thesis Design Project (25%).  The assessment for the 'Design Portfolio Assessment 2' element on this module is a portfolio of work demonstrating a resolved design proposal which integrates the various physical and social contexts within which the final Thesis Design Project is situated (50%). 

Mapping of Learning Outcomes to Assessment Strategy (Indicative)

Learning Outcome Assessment Strategy
1) Begin to demonstrate a critical attitude towards architecture within a body of work; Coursework Assessment (drawings in relation to the dissertation).
2) Produce an appropriate and eloquent visual record of a building precedent, as an integral part of the development of a dissertation; Coursework Assessment (drawings in relation to the dissertation).
3) Demonstrate an ability to interpret the complex inter-relationships between a diverse range of issues and ideas which relate to architecture and to synthesise and communicate them through a coherent visual presentation. Coursework Assessment (drawings in relation to the dissertation)
4) Resolve a complex design project; Design portfolio (2D and 3D representations and work demonstrating the resolved design of the Thesis Design Project)
5) Demonstrate how a design proposal synthesises a wide range of physical, environmental, social and cultural factors, including context, programme, space, form, material, time and experience; Design portfolio (2D and 3D representations and work demonstrating the resolved design of the Thesis Design Project)
6) Effectively communicate the ideas, strategies, character and inhabitation of a design project. Design portfolio (2D and 3D representations and work demonstrating the resolved design of the Thesis Design Project)

Elements of Assessment

Description of Assessment Definitive UNISTATS Categories Percentage
Coursework assessments drawings in relation to the dissertation). Coursework 25%
Design portfolio (Portfolio of 2D and 3D representations of the Thesis Design Project) Coursework 25%
Design portfolio (Portfolio demonstrating the resolved design of the Thesis Design Project) Coursework 50%
Total (to equal 100%) 100%

Achieving a pass

It is a requirement that element of assessment for Coursework is passed separately and it is a requirement that the elements of assessment for the Design Portfolio are passed on aggregate in order to achieve an overall pass for the module.

Bibliography core texts

Ching, F.D.K., 2002. Architectural Graphics, Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons

Bielefeld, B., Skiba, I., 2007. Basics. Technical Drawing, Basel: Birkhäuser

Zell, M., 2008. The Architectural Drawing Course, London: Thames & Hudson

Schilling, A., 2007. Basics. Modelbuildings, Basel: Birkhäuser

Deplazes, A., 2008. Constructing Architecture: Material Processes Structures, Basel: Birkhäuser

Farelly, L., 2008. Representational Techniques. Worthing: Ava Publishing

Spankie, Ro. 2009 Drawing Out the Interior. Worthing: Ava Publishing

Bibliography recommended reading

Pallasmaa, J, 2011. The Embodied Image. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons

Berger, J., 1977. Ways of Seeing. London: Penguin Books Ltd.

Studios will provide specific recommended reading lists relevant to each project.

Evans, R., 1997. Translations from Drawing to Building and Other Essays. London: AA Documents

Meerwein G., Rodeck, B Mahnke, G., 2007. Color.Communication in Architectural Space Basel: Birkhauser

Studios will provide specific recommended reading lists relevant to each project.

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