Ida Djursaa

Research project: Alterity, Plasticity, Sensibility: Transforming Transcendence with Husserl, Levinas and Merleau-Ponty

Abstract

Two general senses of transcendence have historically been at stake in critiques and defences of phenomenology: transcendence as the movement between a subject/body and a world, and transcendence as alterity. My thesis argues, through Husserl, Levinas, and Merleau-Ponty, that these two senses of transcendence coincide on the level of sensibility, and that this warrants a rethinking of transcendence itself. My research project, then, transposes transcendence to the level of bodily sensibility rather than consciousness or perception. This is with the ultimate aim of employing this notion of sensibility to investigate how the particular ways in which our bodies move are structured by our individual history as well as the socio-cultural-historical contexts which invisibly prescribe normative ways of moving and acting based on gender, race, class.

Biography

I am a PhD candidate at the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, London. My research focuses on the phenomenological notion of transcendence such as this relates to bodily sensibility in the works of Husserl, Levinas, and Merleau-Ponty.

I hold an MA in Modern European Philosophy from the CRMEP, and a BA in English Literature from Queen Mary, University of London.

Areas of research interest

  • Modern European Philosophy
  • Phenomenology
  • Critical Phenomenology
  • History of Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Plasticity
  • Metaphysics

Qualifications

  • MA in Modern European Philosophy, Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy
  • BA in English Literature, Queen Mary University of London

Funding or awards received

  • Kingston University Studentship
  • Knud Højgaards fond
  • Augustinusfonden
  • Torben & Alice Frimodts Fond

Publications

New Formations 93, Summer 2018, Book review of Brenna Bhandar and Jonathan Goldberg-Hiller (eds.), Plastic Materialities: Politics, Legality, and Metamorphosis in the Work of Catherine Malabou, Durham and London, Duke University Press, 2015