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Kingston alumnus and singer songwriter Kjetil Morland represents Norway at the 2015 Eurovision Song Contest with his song 'A Monster Like Me'

Posted Tuesday 19 May 2015

Kingston alumnus and singer songwriter Kjetil Morland represents Norway at the 2015 Eurovision Song Contest with his song 'A Monster Like Me'

Kingston graduate Kjetil Morland will duet with Debrah Scarlett to represent Norway in the 60th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest, which is this year hosted in Vienna, Austria following Conchita Wurst's victory in 2014.


Kingston University experts to play key role in European Commission-backed project to help stamp out doping on the amateur sport and fitness circuit

Posted Wednesday 13 May 2015

Kingston University experts to play key role in European Commission-backed project to help stamp out doping on the amateur sport and fitness circuit

Kingston University is playing a key role in a major European initiative to educate young fitness and sports enthusiasts about the dangers of doping and ways to avoid falling victim to the perils of performance and image-enhancing substances. Project SAFE YOU (Strengthening the Anti-doping Fight in Fitness and Exercise in Youth) is being launched with more than €400,000 backing from the European Commission. It will lead to the development of an online tool that will also serve as a comprehensive source of support for teachers, coaches and instructors responsible for anti-doping education.


Kingston University legacy campaign, asking how graduates would like to be remembered, strikes a chord with alumni

Posted Wednesday 13 May 2015

Kingston University legacy campaign, asking how graduates would like to be remembered, strikes a chord with alumni

Legacy marketing - when a university gets in touch with its alumni with the aim of encouraging them to remember their alma mater in their wills - is an increasingly important aspect of higher education fundraising. Following in the footsteps of charities, for which legacies have long been a major income stream, universities have begun to step up their communication with potential will donors.


Kingston University creative writing graduate's debut novel is named Times Children's Book of the Week

Posted Friday 8 May 2015

Kingston University creative writing graduate's debut novel is named Times Children's Book of the Week

A novel about a teenage superhero, which won Kingston University graduate Stefan Mohamed a Dylan Thomas award in 2010, has now been published and is already creating ripples with The Times naming it ‘Children's Book of the Week'.


Hugh Grant reads extract from the Duke of Wellington's description of the Battle of Waterloo to promote Kingston University Journalism professor Brain Cathcart's new book

Posted Wednesday 6 May 2015

A new book written by Kingston University Journalism professor Brian Cathcart has been given a helping hand by one of Britain's most famous names. Actor Hugh Grant has recorded a reading of the Duke of Wellington's famous dispatch, which carried news of the allied victory at the Battle of Waterloo, to support the release of 'The News From Waterloo: the race to tell Britain of Wellington's triumph'.

"I know him a little through my work with the press reform campaign Hacked Off," says Professor Cathcart. "I asked him if he would record a reading of Wellington's famous Waterloo Dis-patch and to my delight he said yes. The result is really terrific." The Hugh Grant recording, which is about 15 minutes in length, is of Wellington's official report to London after the battle, which in its day was very widely republished and well known.

The cover of Professor Brain Cathcart\'s book, The News from Waterloo: The Race to tell Britain of Wellington\'s triumphThe book - which appears in the 200th anniversary year of Napoleon Bonaparte's final defeat - owes its origins to a problem Professor Cathcart encountered when he was preparing a lecture for journalism students. Wanting to illustrate how slowly news travelled in the days before electrical and steam power, he looked up what happened after Waterloo.

"There just wasn't a clear answer, and the more I looked for it the more tangled the story became. That was five or six years ago, and I've had to write a whole book to get things straight," he says.

He sees the result as a case study in news communication that - though the events take place in the Regency period - is relevant even to the smartphone age. The story includes official and unofficial messengers, misinformation and propaganda, while the role of the London newspapers of the day is closely examined.

Hugh Grant reads from Wellington\'s dispatch

April 2015

Kingston University's heat acclimation expertise helps Sir Ranulph Fiennes and other British athletes prepare for the rigours of the Marathon des Sables footrace

Posted Friday 24 April 2015

The winner of the woman\'s race, Elisabet BarnesThe Kingston University Sport Science Consultancy Team has assisted in the training of athletes preparing to compete in the 2015 Marathon des Sables. The race, which celebrated its 30th anniversary this year, is a six-day, 251km (156m) ultramarathon, the equivalent of six regular marathons, which is held each year in the Sahara Desert in temperatures of up to 50°C.

This year, Kingston University provided heat acclimation support to around 25 athletes racing in the desert, including the winner of the women's race, Elisabet Barnes, who won all five stages outright, finishing 19th overall. Elisabet has had a great year of ultra-running, already winning numerous UK races and is planning on going back to the Sahara next year to defend her title. Fellow Brit Gemma Game finished fourth in the women's field and 87th overall.

Danny Kendall, a regular user of the facilities at Kingston University, was looking to improve on his 2014 position of fourth. However, increased competition saw him finish in eighth position overall, the highest-placed British athlete in a world-class field.

Dr Hannha Moir is filmed while assessing Sir Ranulph Fiennes\' firness

Kingston University also helped explorer and adventurer Sir Ranulph Fiennes prepare to be the oldest Briton to complete the event in aid of Marie Curie. Senior lecturer in Health and Exercise Dr Hannah Moir and physiology technician Chris Howe also provided day-by-day analysis of Sir Ranulph's progress throughout the event.

There were many more competitors that were supported by the Kingston University team this year. Two of the athletes, Susie and Shaun, who used the heat chamber and completed the MDS 2015, have further reason to celebrate following their engagement after Shaun battled through sickness during the race to propose on the finish line.

Find out more about heat acclimatisation training at Kingston University

Find out more about studying Exercise, Nutrition & Health BSc(Hons) at Kingston University.


Staff pay tribute to 'larger than life' enterprise and engineering champion Andrew Self

Posted Friday 17 April 2015

Staff pay tribute to 'larger than life' enterprise and engineering champion Andrew Self

Messages of condolence have been pouring in to Kingston University following the death of Professor Andrew Self who has died after a long battle with cancer. Professor Self was the University's Pro Vice-Chancellor for Enterprise and Innovation until his retirement in 2006.


Kingston University alumnus Malcolm Brown appointed President of the Geological Society of London

Posted Thursday 16 April 2015

Kingston alumnus Malcolm BrownMembers of the Geological Society of London have voted Kingston alumnus, Malcolm Brown, to be their next President following a consultative ballot.

Founded in 1807, the Geological Society of London is the UK national society for geoscience and is the oldest geological society in the world. Providing support to over 11,500 members worldwide, the Society aims to improve knowledge and understanding of the Earth, promoting Earth science education and awareness, as well as professional excellence and ethical standards in the work of Earth science.

After graduating from Kingston Polytechnic in 1976 with a BSc in Geology, Malcolm worked in Libya and Saudi Arabia before completing an MSc in Petroleum Geology at Imperial College in 1982. He has worked at BG Group (and previously British Gas) for over 30 years, leading its exploration efforts for much of the last two decades. Mr Brown was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Kingston University in 2007 and is currently Executive Vice President of Exploration at BG Group.

‘It is a great honour to have been voted President designate by the Society's Fellowship' says Malcolm, who has been a Fellow of the Society since 1982, and a Chartered Geologist since 2013. ‘The Geological Society is admired as both a learned society and a professional body, providing impartial advice to those in government and other decision makers, and is a preeminent forum for industry and academic debate. I am committed to maintaining scientific excellence in all its activities during my Presidency.'

Malcolm will serve for a year as President Designate, before taking over from current President Professor David Manning in June 2016. Malcolm regularly returns to Kingston University to share his knowledge and experience with current students. Read more about Malcolm on Kingston's 'Wall of fame'.

  • Find out more about studying Geology at Kingston University

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