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Music & the Creative Economy Masters (MA)

Mode Duration Attendance Start date
Full time 1 year 2 or 3 days a week September 2017
Part time 2 years 2 or 3 days a week September 2017

Choose Kingston's Music & the Creative Economy MA

If you would like to develop your career or create your own business in the music industry, this course is ideal. Whether you are a musician, a composer, a producer or a sound technician, this course will improve your skill set and help you make a living from what you love.

What will you study?

You will explore creativity and how to manage it. The course will show you how to develop your ideas and business plans: we will teach you business development, collaborative and entrepreneurial skills.

Assessment

A mix of project work and formal assessments, including essays, case studies, reports and presentations, plus the final Personal Research Project (maximum 12,000 words).

Why study a Creative Economy course?

Our Creative Economy masters courses give you the opportunity to gain a range of knowledge and experience, including:

  • Gain entrepreneurial skills – help create start-ups and pitch ideas to real industry bosses at a "Dragons' Den", and visit a wide variety of entrepreneurial businesses.
  • Brush up on practical workplace skills such as data collation, review and synopsis.
  • Our students come from all over the world to study on Kingston's creative economy courses, so you will finish the course with an international network of contacts.
  • Excellent teaching – the Managing in the Creative Economy MA course was ranked as one of the best entrepreneurship masters in the world by the Eduniversal masters ranking 2015/16, and Kingston Business School is one of only a few of the 120 UK business schools to be awarded an 'excellent' rating for its teaching quality by the Higher Education Funding Council.
  • Regular visits from industry experts and entrepreneurs, field trips to entrepreneurial businesses and events that connect the creative industry to the local community and give you a valuable network.
  • Students can add study at the prestigious Boston University to their programme and gain a dual masters degree.
  • Kingston Business School has joined an elite group of global institutions to be awarded the prestigious international accreditation by the AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business). A hallmark of excellence in business education, the accreditation has been earned by just 5 per cent of the world's business schools.

Course structure

There are a wide range of music modules to choose from, along with intensive creative economy core modules which you will study with a range of other creatives. These entrepreneurial modules will help you pitch business plans, develop products and even run a start-up.

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules

  • The growth of the 'creative industries' within advanced capitalist countries is a phenomenon of the post-Second World War period – but they are difficult to define and measure.

    The first part of the module will be devoted to the history and definitions of the creative industries. The second part will be concerned with the issues that the sector is facing, such as labour issues, the role of technology, the need for funding and investment, the issue of sustainability and legal issues (intellectual property). This module will offer students the opportunity to grasp the contradictions inherent to the creative industries and their potential for changing – for better or worse – our societies, economies and cultures.

     
  • At the heart of Creative Industries is the notion of artistic creativity. However, far from being the result of individual 'creative geniuses', art works and creativity emerge as the results of a collective process. This is a capability that other sectors now need to understand and emulate. The European Commission's Directorate General for Enterprise and Industry has identified the Creative Industries as 'drivers of social and economic innovation in the economy'.

    This module aims to give students the knowledge and understanding of management processes and behaviours necessary for managing creativity and innovation in the creative industries. They will also explore the ways in which these processes can be used in other sectors of the economy.

     
  • Bridge the gap between creativity and business in this exciting module. You will learn how to develop an innovative product or service and turn it into a viable business by working in a multidisciplinary team. Through design thinking, you'll learn how to identify opportunities for innovation, develop a product that is centred on the user's needs, and design a business model to produce your innovation for the public. Combining skills and courses in new product development, business modelling, social marketing, branding, finance, web design, prototyping, empathy, storytelling and more, you'll learn not only what it takes to become a business creative, but you will also become one yourself. This challenging module is one-year long and combines the knowledge from your background with other modules taken at the University into a live, working business experience.

    To find out more about the learning outcomes of this module, visit the Design Thinking for Start-ups blog which covers what our students are currently working on.

     
  • The Personal Research Project is a self-initiated project reflecting critical evaluation of all your previous learning. It will draw on the knowledge and intellectual skills you have acquired from the core subjects, and the knowledge and skills you have developed in your particular specialism.

    Key to this process will be an awareness and understanding of different research strategies and procedures within a variety of contexts. You will become familiar with different research tools and, more importantly, be in a position to critically evaluate the various tools based on need, context, issues and purpose in relation to problem solving.

    This module is the culmination of the MA experience, and the most ambitious expression of individual interest, motivation, creativity and ability to deliver.

     

Specialist modules

  • This gives you a deep and thorough understanding of the processes and techniques involved in recording and producing popular music. It will look at a range of recording techniques and provide you with the opportunity to gain fluency in operating a recording studio. The role of the producer in creating, developing, managing and presenting a recording project will be studied, and students will be equipped with the faculties to produce work that demonstrates creativity and is of a professional standard.

    Topics covered will include microphone techniques, digital recording and editing techniques, advanced sequencing, mixing and mastering techniques, creating arrangements and communicating with artists and session musicians, investigating genre-specific production techniques, and analysing contemporary and historical recordings. You will also look at the relationship between the producer and the recording and media business. You will be trained to critically evaluate your own work and position it in the context of the wider music and media business environment. You will use these techniques and skills to create a portfolio of short recordings, accompanied by a commentary detailing the techniques employed, and to develop and present a recording project, with supporting documentation.

     
  • This module will teach you about the processes and techniques involved in popular music composition, and show you how to produce work of a professional standard. You will learn compositional techniques that apply to a range of popular music genres and use these to enhance your own personal style and create a portfolio of compositions. You will study the creative process, how collaborators (such as co-writers and band members) communicate with each other and with other artists, and how popular music terminology and notation is used. You will also examine the position of the songwriter and popular music composer within contemporary society, and the wider music and media business.

     
  • This module examines the diversity of practice associated with school-based music provision in the UK maintained sector and associated research. Current positions concerning universal entitlement to the subject will be explored, and traced back to influential antecedents. You will formulate a critical response to course themes by designing a short investigation exploring the complex transactional character of pedagogy that typifies music lessons across the UK. This module will be located in a school, if possible, supported by CRB checking (and, if necessary, ethics clearance), or will be based on student peer teaching. You will analyse outcomes using tools commonly applied to intersubjective contexts, such as activity system modelling, identity profiling and documentation of transactional process.

     
  • This year-long module will introduce a comprehensive range of topics in current sonic arts practice. Through lectures and practical workshops, you will have the opportunity to engage with underlying aesthetics and philosophies while applying specific tools and technologies in practice. Critical review of existing works, class debates and practical demonstrations will encourage you to examine your own practice and work towards creating innovative new sonic art.

    Topics covered may include digital improvisation, audiovisual systems, acousmatic composition, algorithmic composition, interactive technologies and sound installation. You will choose an area to examine in further depth for your portfolio, which will consist of a presentation and written critical and contextual review on an existing sound art work, followed by creating a new work in response to the issues surrounding the chosen piece.

     
  • This module considers the psychological processes that underpin musical understanding; interpersonal communication; the social construction of meaning; and how these processes contribute to the educational philosophies of world cultures. There will be opportunities to investigate the philosophies and practices in music education in a variety of cultural and international contexts, including the UK and those of the students themselves. The issues surrounding teaching music will be explored and, in particular, the views and research associated with composing and how/why it is not explored in many different cultural contexts.

     
  • This module equips you with the skills to create imaginative sound for both experimental and commercial purposes. You will develop an awareness of the potential of sound and the ways in which it can be perceived. Through practical workshops, you will be introduced to a wide range of current digital signal processing and synthesis techniques for creating imaginative sound, including sound for film, TV and other multimedia applications. Alongside acquiring high-level technical skills in sound manipulation and composition, students will develop their ability to evaluate sonic characteristics and engage critically with creative sound design across a range of media.

    Assessment is by a portfolio of creative project work and an online work diary. Project briefs may include designing sound for moving image (including Foley and sound effects), gaming, theatre, sonic art and surround sound work.

     
  • This module deals with the subject of composition for film and television in depth. Through lectures and seminars, you will explore the essential technology and techniques that composers for film and television need to master. Subjects covered include using main themes, underscoring and the harmonic languages of soundtracks, for both big and small screens. Coursework consists of several compositions to image, chosen to encourage musical diversity and exploration of compositional styles, and a written commentary.

     
  • This module considers the art of musical performance from aesthetic and psychological standpoints. It considers performance roles, values, practices, and the psychology of learning and performing music in relation to a range of topics and specific repertoires. Themes explored include: the nature of a musical work; how we learn music; signifiers of a good performance; and performance communication. Aesthetic and psychological issues are addressed within these themed areas, including: issues of authenticity and delivery; the process of learning, producing, reproducing music, and notions of virtuosity; the gestures, expressions and traditions; and meanings and value judgements.

    Themed lectures will introduce topics, followed by seminars which will provide opportunities for you to reflect and discuss issues raised in lectures, which are then consolidated in debates that relate ideas to specific texts, repertoires and personal performances. You will be assessed through prepared debates on topics suggested by the tutor, a critical reflection of a filmed performance and an essay on a related topic selected from a choice provided by the tutor.

     

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

For further information:

Admissions team
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 5441
Email us

Location

This course is taught at Kingston Hill

View Kingston Hill on our Google Maps

For further information:

Admissions team
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 5441
Email us

Location

This course is taught at Kingston Hill

View Kingston Hill on our Google Maps
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