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Aviation Studies for Commercial Pilot Training Foundation Degree FdEng and BSc(Hons) top-up

Qualification Attendance UCAS code/apply Year of entry
FdEng 2 years full time H460 2016 and 2017
BSc(Hons) top-up 1 year full time H461 2016 and 2017
BSc(Hons) top-up 2 years part time Apply direct to the University 2016 and 2017

Please note: Students from outside the EU are not eligible to apply. 

The foundation degree is taught at Bournemouth Commercial Flight Training (BCFT), based at Bournemouth International Airport. Open days for this course will be held there, rather than at Kingston University.

Why choose this course?

This exciting foundation degree provides the opportunity to gain a recognised higher education qualification while acquiring the knowledge and some of the skills you will need to become a pilot. On successful completion of the foundation degree, you can top up to a BSc(Hons) degree.

What you will study 

The curriculum provides the educational base for the ground school phase of a commercial pilot training programme. It covers a broad range of subjects across the areas of science, technology and professional practice - from fundamental engineering concepts to operational procedures and air law.

To qualify for the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) Airline Transport Pilot's Licence (ATPL(A)), you will need to pass the theoretical knowledge exams and carry out the appropriate flight training and flight tests. This course satisfies the requirement for formal theoretical knowledge training and prepares you for the EASA theoretical knowledge exams.

While there is no flying included in the foundation degree course itself, you must have a private pilot's licence (PPL) before you can study the ATPL(A) syllabus. You must have logged a minimum of 20 hours of flying towards your PPL before the start of the course in September. Time is programmed into Year 1 of the foundation degree for students to complete their PPL, but there are significant advantages in passing the PPL before the start of the course. Advice on how best to approach this will be given during the course-specific open days. These are held at Bournemouth Commercial Flight Training (BCFT) at Bournemouth International Airport in Dorset – where this foundation degree is taught. Flying required for an ATPL(A) can also be factored into the programme with BCFT.

The BSc(Hons) top-up course is taught at Kingston University. This course is available to any student who has passed the foundation degree at Bournemouth International Airport, or for any other student who has their ATPL and has some previous experience of higher education. The course aims to extend students' knowledge and skills beyond that required for the ATPL(A), making them even more attractive to airline employers.

Module listing

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Year 1

  • This module covers the syllabus required to pass the EASA PPL theory exams which includes concepts, theories, regulations and terminology applicable to EASA PPL(A) as laid down by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) in CAP 804 Part C.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Describe basic concepts of air law.
    • Describe basic concepts of principles of flight and aircraft general knowledge, loading and performance.
    • Describe basic concepts of human physiology.
    • Describe basic concepts of meteorology.
    • Describe basic concepts of navigation.
    • Describe basic concept of radio and aircraft communications.
     
  • This module delivers a grounding in mathematics and science. The module introduces the fundamentals of engineering mathematics required for aviation studies and the scientific skills.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Understand the terms associated with arithmetic, select and use appropriate arithmetic and algebraic methods to solve problems and perform calculations.
    • Describe the properties and uses of different numbering systems, convert numbers between bases and perform basic arithmetic operations on numbers with different bases.
    • Identify geometric constructions and solve geometric and trigonometric problems.
    • Demonstrate the characteristic features of graphs and be able to represent data and functions in graphical form. Relate Cartesian (polar) co-ordinates to vectors and vice versa and perform related calculations.
    • Explain the uses of integration and differentiation and solve practical problems using elementary differential and integral calculus.
    • Describe the nature and properties of solids, fluids and gases, the structure of atoms, molecules and compounds and the changes between states.
    • Describe the terms, explain the basic principles and use the techniques and formulas associated with mechanics, kinetics, light propagation and optics, wave motion and sound, fluid dynamics and thermodynamics.
     
  • This is designed to cover the syllabus required to pass the EASA Aircraft General Knowledge and Instrumentation ATPL theory exam. The module includes mechanical, electrical, radio and thermodynamic principles applied in the airframes, systems and power plants of commercial aeroplanes. In addition, the module deals with various cockpit and engine instruments, including warning systems, sense and display the relevant data to aircrew.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Investigate the physical loads that are applied to aircraft structures in flight and describe the regulations, methods and materials that are employed in the design and manufacture of commercial aircraft.
    • Describe the requirements, functions, operating principles and components of typical piston engine and gas turbine power plants used in commercial aeroplanes.
    • Describe the requirements, functions, operating principles and components of typical aircraft systems used in commercial aeroplanes.
    • Explain the operation, accuracy, errors and limitations of aircraft instruments.
    • Explain the operation and integration of Inertial Navigation/Reference Systems, Flight Management Computers, Automatic Flight Control Systems, Autothrottle and Yaw Dampers.
     
  •  

    This module is designed to cover the syllabus required to pass the EASA Operational Procedures, Air Law and Communications ATPL theory exams. The module deals with the procedures and regulations relating to the operation of commercial aircraft; to include the concepts, regulations and terminology applicable to aviation law as laid down by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) in accordance with the Convention on International Civil Aviation (Chicago) Doc 7300/6.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the role of ICAO and associated agencies.
    • State regulations under which commercial aviation is conducted.
    • Describe the procedures followed in commercial aviation.
    • Transmit clear, concise information across aeronautical radio networks using correct phraseology.
     

Year 2

  • This module is designed to cover the syllabus required to pass the EASA Meteorology ATPL theory exam. The module deals with the theory and concepts relating to the generation and impact of global weather in relation to commercial flying operations.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the composition and structure of the earth's atmosphere and its role in the generation and development of weather.
    • Explain the characteristics of the world's climatic zones and pressure systems.
    • Understand the nature of wind in terms of its origins, measurement and characteristics throughout the atmosphere.
    • State the various types of fog and cloud and the nature of their causation.
    • Discuss flight hazards relating to icing, turbulence, wind shear, thunderstorms and tornadoes.
    • Analyse and interpret weather charts and assess the various meteorological services available to commercial flight crews.
     
  • This module is designed to cover the syllabus required to pass the EASA General Navigation and Radio Navigation ATPL theory exams. The module deals with the theory, practical application of current navigation techniques/ procedures for both VFR and IFR flights. The theory of operation, technical details, errors and limitations of most of the common airborne and ground based radio and radar equipment used in aviation is also included.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Describe the solar system and the form of the Earth and be able to calculate Local Mean Time, Standard Time, UTC and Zone Time at any position on Earth.
    • Describe the Earth's magnetic field, aircraft magnetism, the principles of operation of a Direct Reading Compass and Gyro Magnetic Compass, the practical procedures and calculations involved in Compass Swinging Procedures.
    • Explain the theory behind and demonstrate the application of modern navigation techniques.
    • State the principles of operation, assess the errors and limitations and interpret the various displays of the radio/radar equipment typically used in modern aircraft.
    • List the frequency band, frequency range, mode of propagation, and accuracy of this equipment.
    • Explain the principle of operation and limitations of the different types of area navigation systems used in aviation.
     
  • This module is designed to cover the syllabus required to pass the EASA Aircraft Principles of Flight and Performance and Mass & Balance ATPL theory exams. The module deals with the theory of fixed wing heavier than air vehicles and flight stability and the theory and practical application of fixed wing aircraft performance planning. In addition, the theory, JAA regulations and practical application of aircraft mass and balance as applied to aeroplanes is covered.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Describe the properties of the Earth's atmosphere and discuss the factors that affect subsonic, transonic and supersonic airflow around a body.
    • Explain the theory of flight and perform basic calculations related to simple manoeuvres.
    • Discuss aircraft static and dynamic stability including the various factor that affect stability and the interaction between different modes of stability.
    • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of how factor such as aircraft mass, runway specification and environmental conditions affect the performance of fixed wing aircraft.
    • Investigate and carry out take-off, cruise and landing performance planning processes for certificated under EASA part 23 and part 25.
    • Describe how changes in aircraft mass and centre of gravity position, affect the handling, stability and performance of aeroplanes.
    • Perform mass and balance calculations for aircraft.
     
  • This module is designed to cover the syllabus required to pass the EASA Human Performance and Flight Planning ATPL theory exams. The module deals with the physiological and psychological impact of operating commercial aircraft. In addition, the module includes flight planning procedures and JAA fuel planning procedures for single engine piston (SEP), multi-engine piston (MEP) and medium range jet transport (MRJT) aircraft.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Discuss the impact of operating high-speed and high-altitude aircraft on the human circulatory and respiratory system.
    • Discuss the implications of commercial flying operations on the human sensory system and sleep cycle.
    • Discuss the basic psychological issues relating to multi-crew commercial operations.
    • Complete simple VFR and IFR flight planning exercises.
    • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of fuel planning policy and practice.
    • Extract various aeronautical information from all sections of the student Jeppesen Pilot Route Manual.
     

Year 3 (optional BSc top-up year)

  • On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Assess the performance of a range of aircraft propulsion systems.
    • Estimate the performance of fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft.
    • Analyse idealisations of typical aircraft structures.
    • Evaluate the suitability of materials for aircraft applications.
     
  • This module aims to allow you to explore how employers within the air transport industry combines related areas such as aircraft design, maintenance, operations or repair and overhaul in order to make a profit. The module compares the operation of the air transport market with that in other sectors, in particular, looking at standard methods of recording and reporting financial performance.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Assess the potential impact of an airline's business strategy.
    • Discuss the major determinants of air transport supply, demand and cost.
    • Analyse business accounts and, thereby, be able to describe company performance.
    • By means of the appropriate planning and analysis, assess the options open to a business at any stage in its lifecycle.
     
  • This module examines all the factors that involves creating an airline operational schedule. The module deals with how the route is selected and the appropriate fares determined.  Requirements for getting the aircraft airborne, from aircrew, operations and maintenance perspectives, as well as when there is adverse conditions and how the airline can recover from such disruption in the shortest possible time.

    On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Contribute to the effective planning of airline operations.
    • Construct robust airline fleet assignment, maintenance and routing plans to meet a given schedule.
    • Describe how airlines recover their schedules following periods of irregular operations.
    • Detail the requirements and practices of effective revenue management.
    • Work as a member of a team to derive a solution to a specified air transport operational requirement.
     
  • On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

    • Investigate or review a specified topic according to given guidelines.
    • Organise and carry out any appropriate experimental work, questionnaires and/or surveys.
    • Collate data from experimental work or other sources and use appropriate statistical methods to analyse data.
    • Draw conclusions based on analysis of information/data and comment on them.
    • Present information and arguments orally and in the form of a poster-style display. Structure a report according to guidelines provided and write, in clear English, a description of the project and a logical discussion of the processes, results and conclusions.
     

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University on a not-for-credit basis as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

Key information set

The scrolling banner(s) below display some key factual data about this course (including different course combinations or delivery modes of this course where relevant).

We aim to ensure that all courses and modules advertised are delivered. However in some cases courses and modules may not be offered. For more information about why, and when you can expect to be notified, read our Changes to Academic Provision.

Ask a question about this course

Admissions administrator
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 4545
Email us

Location

This course is taught at Bournemouth Commercial Flight Training (FdEng) and Kingston University (top-up)

Ask a question about this course

Admissions administrator
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 4545
Email us

Location

This course is taught at Bournemouth Commercial Flight Training (FdEng) and Kingston University (top-up)

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