Civil and Infrastructure Engineering BEng (Hons) Degree Apprenticeship

Why choose this programme?

The programme provides a strong platform for pursuing and achieving a varied and interesting career in Civil Engineering, and incorporates recent developments in industry and education as well as the curriculum and teaching principles from research and academia.

Typically, you'll spend one day a week at university rather than your place of employment. There will also be learning activities and training at your workplace.

Three work-based learning modules, supported by your employer, will combine your own civil engineering interests and learning with those of your employer. The programme leads to the award of a BEng (Hons) Civil and Infrastructure Engineering (Degree Apprenticeship) and a professional qualification through End-Point Assessment (EPA).

Further details are available on the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education website.

Attendance Year of entry
5 years part time 2022

2021 entry

If you are planning to join this course in the academic year 2021/22 (i.e. between September 2021 and August 2022), please view the information about changes to courses for 2021/22 due to Covid-19.

 

Continuing students

Students who are continuing their studies with Kingston University in 2021/22 should refer to their Course Handbook for information about specific changes that have been, or may be, made to their course or modules being delivered in 2021/22. Course Handbooks are located within the Canvas course page.

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • Kingston University was involved in the Trailblazer Group and developed the programme in collaboration with leading employers.
  • Kingston is one of the first universities to offer the Level 6 Civil Engineer Degree Apprenticeship (ST0417).
  • This was the first Civil Engineering Degree Apprenticeship course to be accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM).
Reasons to choose Kingston University

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators, under licence from the Engineering Council. On completion, the apprentice will have fully satisfied the educational base for an Incorporated Engineer (IEng) and partially satisfied the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng). Therefore, successful apprentices will have satisfied the requirements for professional registration as an Incorporated Engineer – an internationally recognised benchmark of competence.

What you will study

This programme is offered in a part-time mode, with weekly one-day release from employment and scheduled continuing learning at work place, and leads to the award of BEng (Hons) Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Degree Apprenticeship.

An apprentice does not successfully finish their apprenticeship without successfully completing the End-Point Assessment (EPA).

The BEng (Hons) Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Degree Apprenticeship is designed as a non-integrated programme for apprentices who wish to study Civil Engineering to Honours Degree level through the five-year Degree Apprenticeship scheme and aspire to achieve the professional status of Chartered Engineer (following further learning). Thus, it offers the ideal preparation for a varied and interesting career in the world of Civil Engineering.

The programme embraces recent developments in education and industry and the curriculum and teaching benefits from the research interests of the academic staff. The design of the programme is based on the guidelines provided by the Engineering Council UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC), the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering, and the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) Guidelines for Accredited BEng (Hons) Degree Programmes.

Modules

This programme is offered in a part-time mode, with weekly one-day release from employment with scheduled learning in addition to learning and training at work place, and leads to the award of BEng (Hons) Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Degree Apprenticeship. The programme is completed when apprentices have successfully achieved 270 credits through typical modules (90 credits at each level of 4, 5 and 6) and 90 credits as work-based modules (30 credits at each level of 4, 5 and 6) that are university designed and assessed.

Please refer to the current list of modules and note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list as these could change before your year of entry.

On this programme, you will gain a good mix of theoretical, practical, academic, management and industrial-based skills.

Entry level

Prior knowledge, skills and behaviours can exempt individuals from certain elements of the programme, resulting in different entry levels and learner journeys for the apprentices.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Final year

Year 1 develops your skills in engineering science, mathematics, computing, engineering drawing (including AutoCAD), fluid mechanics, soil mechanics, structures, materials and sustainable construction and design. There is an emphasis on practical work, including surveying, model-making and computer-aided design packages.

Core modules and workshops

Sustainable Construction and Design (Work-based learning module)

30 credits

This is a core module for all level 4 Degree Apprenticeship students in the Department of Civil Engineering. The module introduces the concept of sustainability and its impact upon civil engineering and construction. It incorporates a consideration of the stages of design including demolition, possible reuse, recycling, sustainable materials, techniques and design and construction methods. There are cross linkages with other modules and this module forms a basis for further study in succeeding years. The module covers the historical background and the concept of sustainability, including social, political and environmental issues. It also introduces the basic principles of land surveying in an engineering design context and provides practical knowledge on using surveying instruments, along with Building Information Modelling (BIM) application in the engineering design process.

Structures and Engineering Materials

30 credits

The module covers the fundamentals of structural analysis along with the characteristics and physical properties of a broad range of engineering materials. Material test methods will be used to determine the deformations and failure of the various engineering materials.  A selection of materials for civil engineering applications, such as metal, ceramics, polymer and composites will be studied including their impact on the environment. All engineering structures can be modelled mathematically and are subjected to static loading of different types.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • describe the characteristics of a range of engineering materials including metal, ceramics and polymer and outline the material properties, including their carbon footprint;
  • explain the mechanisms of elastic and plastic deformation and their relationship to the microstructure of the material;
  • understand and apply the concept of fracture mechanics as analytical tools of various failure modes including brittle, ductile, fatigue, creep and corrosion;
  • solve determinate structures, truss and beams, using statics and the principles of equilibrium which include solving algebraic equations, and solving first and second order ordinary differential equations analytically;
  • determine section properties for simple structural shapes; and
  • understand and apply qualitative solutions to structural behaviour, and engineer's theory of bending to determine induced stresses within structural components.
Engineering Mathematics and Computing Applications

30 credits

The aim of this module is to provide a thorough background in engineering mathematics and equip you with the mathematical skills essential for solving engineering problems. The module also introduces the use of computing methods in engineering. The mathematics part comprises algebra, functions, logarithms, trigonometry, calculus, differential equations and vectors. The computing part covers the use of software for problem solving, visualisation and data representation. The emphasis is on using mathematical and computational tools to solve engineering problems.

Year 2 comprises practical-focused studies covering specific civil engineering subjects such as hydraulics, geotechnics, structures, construction materials and site surveying.

Core modules and workshops

Fluid and Soil Mechanics

30 credits

This module introduces the fundamental properties of fluids and soils covering the basic conservation equations used in fluid mechanics and the essential aspects of soil mechanics. It also includes the concept of dimensions and the SI units of measurement utilised in science and engineering. There is extensive working in an engineering laboratory, the analysis of test data, using appropriate software, and the production of a succinct laboratory report. 

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • describe basic fluid properties and the fundamental equations of fluid mechanics;
  • describe basic soil properties and the fundamentals of soil mechanics;
  • discuss the role of soil mechanics and site investigation in civil engineering;
  • work safely and effectively in engineering laboratories;
  • analyse laboratory data using software where applicable; and
  • carry out calculations in SI Units and write succinct technical reports.
Engineering Surveying

30 credits

This is a core module for Civil and Infrastructure Engineering students at Level 5. Surveying is a fundamental skill expected of any civil engineer and this module builds on the surveying introduced at Level 4 in EG4010. This module exposes you to the instrumentation and observation principles of modern engineering surveying, and develops your theoretical understanding and relevant mathematical expertise as well as your practical skills. The operating principles of surveying equipment (including GNSS/GPS), are all covered in the programme and supported by practical exercises including a residential field course. Further sessions explore a range of mathematically more advanced themes such as error analysis and geometric designs (eg. road curves, earthworks) that forms some basis for aspects of the Level 6 module CE6012.

Year 3 comprises practical-focused studies covering specific civil engineering subjects such as hydraulics, geotechnics, structures and construction. You will also gain a thorough grounding in project and business management. There are two residential field courses, in engineering surveying and geotechnical engineering.

Core modules and workshops

Geotechnical Engineering 1 and Hydraulics

30 credits

This is a core module for level 5 Civil and Infrastructure Engineering students that builds upon the level 4 Module EG4013, developing the analysis and engineering design in hydraulics and geotechnics. The hydraulics section considers natural river courses and the conveyance of water through pipelines, culverts and canals. The geotechnics section concentrates on engineering geology, emphasising the influence of subsurface conditions on civil engineering design and construction; also covered are principles of effective stress and shear strength as well as their use in design. The analysis of groundwater seepage and the dewatering of below-ground works are linked to other aspects of civil engineering hydraulics. The module is primarily delivered through a programme of interactive sessions supported by an extensive laboratory programme and a week-long residential field trip.

Structural Engineering 1 and Construction Materials

30 credits

This is a core module for level 5 Civil and Infrastructure Engineering students. The module expands on the methodologies and techniques given in EG4011 for structural design at a fundamental level in steel, concrete, masonry and timber, and develops your ability to produce competent and professional structural designs. The consideration of a variety of construction materials, including sustainability issues, will help you to develop your knowledge and understanding of material behaviour, an essential component of civil engineering projects. The module will include the design of civil engineering structures from a conceptual viewpoint laying the foundations for the level 6 module CE6013.

Project and Business Management (Work-based learning module)

30 credits

This is a core module for all level 5 Degree Apprenticeship students in the Department of Civil Engineering. The module includes principles and commercial practices for the management of engineering projects and related wider business operations. The nature of project engineering and business management is considered in the context of quality, time, risk and sustainability. The module is contextualised for Civil Engineering and Construction professionals to promote and broaden knowledge of how companies and organisations work in the project and business environment. This module continues effective team working as well as developing interpersonal skills.

Year 4 is when you will study the development, design and construction of sustainable infrastructure, focusing on water engineering, transport, highway and the energy sector. You will also start your individual project.

Core modules and workshops

Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment

30 credits

This is a core module for the final year BEng and BSc Civil Engineering courses. The module has been formulated to broaden your perspective on the infrastructure that underpins a developed society and the role of the civil engineer in its design, construction, maintenance and management. The requirement for sustainable solutions will be emphasised throughout the module, considering the influencing environmental, economic, social and political factors. A global perspective will be introduced by considering case studies throughout the world and discussing the different factors that influence the infrastructure. Graduate employment opportunities will be outlined in the various sectors, reinforced by guest lectures from expert practitioners/researchers and relevant site visits. The module will consider the broad range of infrastructure with a focus on transportation and water, opening up career path opportunities for graduates.

Individual Project and Research Methods (Work-based learning module)

30 credits

This is a core module for level 6 BEng apprentices. The individual project is an opportunity to explore a subject of the apprentice's own choice and to initiate, design and execute a small scale research project under supervision at their work place. The work in the project will draw upon material from all modules previously or currently taught and provide a culmination to their degree. Additionally, this allows the apprentices to develop and practice their research skills that will be invaluable for the future. The apprentices are encouraged to work independently, study a topic in depth, review previous work, collect, and interpret and analyse information. This is also intended to develop apprentices' ability to communicate clearly and succinctly orally, graphically and in writing. In undertaking the work they should demonstrate knowledge and competence in reviewing literature and in using one or more of a range of research methods to collect and analyse data and draw well-founded conclusions. To support the apprentice a series of lectures in research methods is given and individual one-to-one supervision ensures that the apprentice is supported in the process. Assessment is by submission of an initial formative research statement and summative assessments comprise an interim report, an oral presentation and the completed project.

In your final year you will study building and environmental engineering, the development, design and construction of sustainable infrastructure, focusing on water engineering, transport, highway and the energy sector. You will continue your individual project and take part in a major group design exercise with fellow students.

Core modules and workshops

Structural Engineering 2 and Geotechnical Engineering 2

30 credits

This is a core module for level 6 Civil and Infrastructure Engineering students. The module covers methodologies and techniques for the structural analysis and design of steel, concrete and timber structures at an advanced level, as well as geotechnical design of a wide range of foundations, building upon knowledge gained at Level 5. Upon the completion of this module you will be able to produce competent and professional structural and geotechnical designs. This will stimulate you to develop an interest and awareness of the scope and nature of structural and geotechnical engineering within the design process and to encourage creativity. Development of team working skills and independent study is an important part of the module. This module intends: to develop structural and geotechnical design technical skills, to increase awareness of the role of the structural and geotechnical engineers in solving design and construction problems, to encourage you to utilise your membership of professional institutions and to enhance your employability.

Individual Project and Research Methods (Work-based learning module)

30 credits

This is a core module for level 6 BEng apprentices. The individual project is an opportunity to explore a subject of the apprentice's own choice and to initiate, design and execute a small scale research project under supervision at their work place. The work in the project will draw upon material from all modules previously or currently taught and provide a culmination to their degree. Additionally, this allows the apprentices to develop and practice their research skills that will be invaluable for the future. The apprentices are encouraged to work independently, study a topic in depth, review previous work, collect, and interpret and analyse information. This is also intended to develop apprentices' ability to communicate clearly and succinctly orally, graphically and in writing. In undertaking the work they should demonstrate knowledge and competence in reviewing literature and in using one or more of a range of research methods to collect and analyse data and draw well-founded conclusions. To support the apprentice a series of lectures in research methods is given and individual one-to-one supervision ensures that the apprentice is supported in the process. Assessment is by submission of an initial formative research statement and summative assessments comprise an interim report, an oral presentation and the completed project.

Business Management and Group Project

30 credits

This module gives you an opportunity to work as a member of a design team on an Aerospace/Mechanical/Civil design project. It also further develops your broader understanding of the business context of engineering activities. It will develop a set of skills and techniques which will prepare you for employment.

The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. The regulations governing this course are available on our website. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this may not be offered.

Entry requirements

Typical offer 2022

UCAS tariff points: 112-120

A-level

  • A-level (or equivalent) in Mathematics at grade C or above.
  • General studies and Native language at both A-Level and AS Level not automatically accepted in the tariff.

BTEC level

  • BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Engineering including Construction and Built Environment, including minimum Merit in Maths and Further Maths
  • BTEC Level 3 Diploma is not accepted.
  • Access HE diploma is not accepted.

Also required:

  • Five GCSE subjects grades A*-C including Mathematics and English Language (or comparable numeric score under the newly reformed GCSE grading).
  • Working in industry.
  • Sponsorship from an approved employer within the industry.
  • Meeting all the requirements of the Education and Skills Funding Agency to undertake an apprenticeship as listed in the Apprenticeship Funding Rules.

Alternative routes

We will consider a range of alternative qualifications that are equivalent to level 3.

Applications from those that have undertaken a Engineering foundation year will also be considered.

Direct entry to Level 5, year 2 and part-time (non-degree apprenticeship route):

This mode of entry requires exemption from Year 1 of the programme. This is normally attained with a BTEC Higher National Certificate in Civil Engineering or similar qualification, with a minimum of five merits to include analytical subjects. Applicants for the part-time programme (non-degree apprenticeship route) should be employed in the construction or related industries. 

International

Higher and Degree Apprenticeship programmes are not suitable for international applicants without the Right to Work in England. Applicants must be employed and individual employers will set the selection criteria for their apprenticeships. International applicants need to look at the details of each apprenticeship vacancy and contact the employer to check their eligibility criteria. Academically, students registering to the programme will need to meet the relevant entry criteria.

Degree apprenticeship

Kingston University is an active member of the Civil Engineering Design Degree Apprenticeship Group led and managed by Technical Apprenticeship Consortium. Currently this consortium includes a group of large multi-national consulting companies as well as contractors and local governmental bodies with a number of regional educational providers.

The prime function of this Consortium is to define a partnership model through which employers and universities can deliver successful apprenticeship degree programme which integrates Bachelor of Engineering (BEng).

Kingston University had a progression rate of 94% for the 2018/19 academic year.

Teaching and assessment

As the predominant part of the 20% off-the-job training, the BEng programme in Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Degree Apprenticeship has been designed, taking into account the Kingston University Curriculum Design Principles, to help develop apprentices into graduates that are professional, thoughtful, creative, resilient, proactive and globally aware independent, equipping them to be lifelong learners.

In total, 75% of the degree element of the programme will be delivered at the university and the remaining 25% will be delivered through work-based learning. Associated tutorials, laboratory practicals, fieldwork, site visits and design classes are used to enhance the lecture material and continuing learning at work. The programme is devised to encourage and develop apprentices with confident interpersonal and communication skills, as well as emphasising group work, data analysis and ICT skills.

The contact hours associated with a module at the University depends on the module type, but typically a module would comprise 3 hours per week lecture/tutorial and one hour per week for a design/practical session. Apprentices are expected to spend the remaining hours for a 30 credit module in guided independent study. Typically, the contact hours associated with a work-based module would comprise an hour per week for a tutorial during teaching weeks and eight hours for lecture/practical sessions during non-teaching weeks (10% of the module). Apprentices are expected to spend the remaining hours for a 30 credit module in work-based learning (circa 70%) and guided independent study (circa 20%).

Guided independent study

When not attending timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for final assignments. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the online virtual learning platform.

Academic support

Our academic support team here at Kingston University provides help in a range of areas.

Dedicated personal tutor

When you arrive, we'll introduce you to your personal tutor. This is the member of academic staff who will provide academic guidance, be a support throughout your time at Kingston and who will show you how to make the best use of all the help and resources that we offer at Kingston University.

Your workload

ActivityHours
Workshops 123
Lectures, tutorials and practicals 672
Integrative project work, group work and supervised group meetings 40
Laboratory 119
Field work and site visits 104
Summative assessments (50%) 320
Work-based learning (including credit bearing) 386
Workplace mentor meetings 148

How you will be assessed

Assessment typically comprises exams (e.g. test or exam), practical (e.g. presentations, performance) and coursework (e.g. essays, reports, self-assessment, portfolios, dissertation). The approximate percentage for how you will be assessed on this programme is as follows, though depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose.

Assessment

Assessment
  • Coursework: 60%
  • Exams: 40%

Based on the Education and Skills Funding Agency funding rules your on-the-job training will also be assessed to ensure that it meets the requirements of the apprenticeship standard. You will also need to successfully complete an End-Point Assessment.

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Your timetable

Your individualised timetable is normally available to learners within 48 hours of enrolment. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 6pm.

Class sizes

To give you an indication of class sizes, this programme normally attracts 20 learners and lecture sizes are normally 20-100. However this can vary by module and academic year.

Who teaches this programme?

The programme is taught at the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing. Faculty staff have a wide range of experience across research and industry and continue to practice and research at the cutting edge of their discipline. This ensures that our programmes are current and industry informed ensuring you get the most relevant and up to date education possible.

Staff will use their experience and professional networks to hone your skills and shape you into the next generation of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduates.

Postgraduate students may run or assist in lab sessions and may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

Programme fees and funding

2022/23 fees for this programme

This degree apprenticeship programme is funded through the Government's Apprenticeship Levy within the approved funding band.

Additional costs

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which learners will need to consider when planning their studies.

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees.

Where a programme has additional expenses, we make every effort to highlight them. These may include optional field trips, materials, security checks such as DBS, uniforms, specialist clothing or professional memberships.

Text books

Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. You may prefer to, or be required to, buy your own copy of key textbooks.

Computer equipment

There are open-access networked computers available across the University, plus laptops available to loan. You may find it useful to have your own PC, laptop or tablet which you can use around campus and in halls of residences. Free Wi-Fi is available on each of the campuses.

Printing

In the majority of cases coursework can be submitted online. There may be instances when you will be required to submit work in a printed format. Printing and photocopying costs are not included in your tuition fees.

Travel

You may need to pay additional travel costs for placements. If you are an apprentice, you can apply for an apprenticeship oyster card.

Facilities

There is a wide range of facilities for practical work at our Penrhyn Road campus, where this course is based. You will have access to a modern environment with the latest technology and industry-standard equipment, including:

  • extensive materials and structures facility for concrete, masonry, steel and timber;
  • geotechnical and hydraulics testing facilities; and
  • surveying equipment, such as satellite global-positioning systems.

Dedicated computer-aided design facilities include:

  • a range of CAD/CAM packages, such as Ideas, SolidWorks and AutoCad;
  • finite element analysis
  • computational fluid dynamics; and
  • virtual instrumentation.

What our students say

Civil Engineering students, Anya and Kievan talk about their experience studying at Kingston University:

What our graduates say

I am using my experience from Kingston to carry out cost, energy and environmental impact assessments of buildings over their total lifetime.

Julie Chouquet – Graduated: 1999

End-Point Assessment (EPA)

Each apprentice on an approved Apprenticeship Standard is required to take an End-Point Assessment (EPA) to complete the programme. The EPA is delivered by an End-Point Assessment Organisation (EPAO) that is registered with the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA).

The EPA is either integrated as part of the apprenticeship or completed after the course element. If an apprentice is completing the EPA after the course element, they must ensure they have successfully completed their learning, achieved the gateway requirements and finished uploading their evidence prior to taking the EPA.

What does an End-Point Assessment (EPA) involve?

There is no common format for an EPA, as they vary between apprenticeships. All EPAs are developed from 'assessment plans', drawn up by the trailblazer group responsible for apprenticeship standard and subsequently approved by the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education (IfATE).

An apprentice's EPA plan must detail the knowledge, skills and experience that they are expected to achieve as assessed by independent assessors. Employers have an important role in assessing competency and they have a key responsibility at the gateway in signing off the apprentice as ready to undertake EPA.

The EPA can be conducted either be awarding organisations, training providers like Kingston University, in case of integrated assessment, or End-Point Assessment Organisations (EPAOs). Without exception all should;

  • EPA must be conducted by an independent EPAO, which must be on the Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations. EPAOs will employ independent assessors.
  • Ensure independence – the EPA should be an independent assessment of an apprentice's competence. The decision on whether an apprentice has passed their EPA and what their final grade should be, must be taken by someone who has no vested interest in this decision or relationship to the apprentice. This is to ensure that all apprentices are treated fairly and helps to maintain trust in the robustness of the EPA system.
  • Underpin their EPA services with independent quality assurance.
  • Have relevant occupational experience of the apprenticeship standard.
  • Meet at least twice annually, review programme content and delivery, consider feedback from apprentices, employers and academics, and report findings annually to the University – through established committee structure and to employers.

Who provides a non-integrated assessment?

Employers can choose any organisation listed on the Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations (RoEPAO) against the apprenticeship standard being taken by their apprentice. RoEPAO lists organisations that have been assessed by the ESFA as being suitable to conduct independent EPA of apprentices. The employer can then inform Kingston University who will support the EPA process.

How is an integrated assessment different?

For apprenticeship that follow an integrated approach, the University delivering the apprenticeship will also be the EPAO and must be on the RoEPAO. Thus, integrated apprenticeships are where Kingston University provides both the scheduled teaching as well as the EPA. No independent assessor organisation is required – though the EPA still must still deliver an impartial result –with assessors independent of the apprentice and their employer and, where possible, the assessors come from a third-party organisation, for example, a professional body or another employer. If this is not possible, they may be sourced from within the same University but must be occupationally competent, meet any other conditions for assessors and not have been involved in the on-programme delivery.

For further details on EPA process for a particular apprenticeship programme please contact the relevant Apprenticeship Course Leader or Faculty Student/Degree Apprenticeship Officer. You can also get in touch with the Kingston University apprenticeships team via degreeapprenticeships@kingston.ac.uk or 020 8417 5492.

Local Employer Group (LEG)

The LEG was established to monitor, support and enhance the delivery and operation of the programme. This includes management and periodically reviewing of work-based learning by this established local employer group with the aim of delivering an apprenticeship programme that is a high-quality satisfactory experience for all. Representatives of apprentices are invited to serve on the group. Terms of reference include:

In advance of each group meeting, the course administrator asks the apprentice representative to gather feedback from their fellow apprentices to be channelled through them at the meeting.

Next steps

Next steps

Employees

If you are currently employed full-time and would like to find out more about apprenticeships, please ask your employer to contact the Kingston University apprenticeship team.

Employers

If you are an employer interested in how apprenticeships can support your organisation and employees, please contact the apprenticeship team for further details.

Changes to courses for 2021/22 due to Covid-19

Course information (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Composition of the course

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and, therefore, we do not anticipate having to make any further changes to the course, i.e. number of modules or credits in a year, in response to issues arising from the pandemic. However, if this becomes necessary, the changes will be highlighted to students via email before enrolment.

Unless government advice instructs otherwise, Study Abroad programmes will take place in 2021/22. The safety of all our students is paramount, therefore, as per normal practice, all Study Abroad activities must also be approved by the University's insurers to ensure that students are adequately protected during their period abroad. We will provide updates as the pandemic situation stabilises and/or further government advice is released.

Changes can be made to courses as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and in response to feedback from students and other key stakeholders. Any such changes made to the composition of the course will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

Modules

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and, therefore, we do not anticipate having to make any further changes to module titles and summaries or to the availability of modules in response to issues arising from the pandemic.

Changes can be made to modules as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to module titles, module summaries and/or availability of modules will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

Length of course

We expect to deliver the course within the planned timescales to enable successful students to progress through and graduate from the course without delay.

In exceptional circumstances the sequence of learning and teaching activities may be changed in 2021/22, e.g. moving those modules which can be delivered more effectively to the first teaching block and moving back those – such as practical modules and placements – which may be more difficult to deliver due to some ongoing restrictions.

In some cases, it may be necessary to delay placement modules which may then impact the length of the course. In these circumstances the University will guide students through the appropriate options available to ensure students are able to make informed choices.

Entry requirements (changes for 2021/22 entry)

We have not changed entry requirements as a direct result of the pandemic.

Entry requirements for international students

We have not changed entry requirements for international students as a direct result of the pandemic.

Teaching (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Changes to the way the course will be delivered

As we transition from the pandemic restrictions, we expect to steadily increase the proportion of on-campus teaching. We will continue to provide a proportion of online learning, as experience has shown that this enriches and supports the student learning experience.

If the pandemic affects teaching and learning activities in 2021/22 more than we currently anticipate, the proportion of online learning will increase. However, unless a lockdown is enforced, we will ensure that all courses provide a reasonable percentage of their teaching and learning activities on campus.

Should your circumstances prevent your attendance at on-campus sessions, you should still be able to engage with your course remotely in a way that allows you to progress. Where this is not possible, for example on courses with high practical content, your course team will be able to advise you on the options available to you.

Changes to teaching in the event of a further lockdown or adjustments in government advice

The University will continue to closely monitor government announcements and advice in relation to the pandemic and, where required, will take any necessary action in order to comply with such advice.

In the event that a further lockdown is enforced in 2021/22 the University will aim to deliver the course fully online once more. The majority of our courses are prepared to be delivered fully online if the situation requires it. Where the quality of the student experience may be compromised, or the course is unable to be delivered fully online, the University may need to suspend the delivery of that course until a time that it can be delivered. Students will be supported in these situations to ensure they are able to make the right choices for their particular circumstances.

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for Year 1

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled learning and teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours were not and will not be made as a direct result of the pandemic.

‘Scheduled learning and teaching' includes teaching delivered online, either live or recorded/on demand.

Timetable

Your individualised timetable for teaching block 1 (i.e. up to December 2021) should be available by the end of August. Timetables for teaching block 2 (i.e. from January 2022) will not be available until the autumn. We make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible.

In 2020/21 it was agreed that scheduled learning and teaching could take place on any day of the week between 9am and 9pm, to maximise the time available for teaching in order to accommodate smaller group sizes and social distancing. This meant we sometimes had to use Wednesday afternoons and enrichment week for additional teaching slots. If we need to accommodate smaller group sizes and social distancing in 2021/22 we expect to adopt a similar approach. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Assessment (changes for 2021/22 entry)

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and, therefore, do not anticipate having to make any further changes to the course, i.e. to the overall methods of assessments, in response to issues arising from the pandemic. However, if this becomes necessary, the changes will be highlighted to students via email before enrolment.

Changes are made to modules, including how they are assessed, as part of normal enhancement processes to keep our modules up to date with current developments in that subject area and in response to feedback received from students and other key stakeholders. Any changes to the overall methods of assessment for Year 1 of the course will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

If social distancing or lockdown restrictions are in place in 2021/22, online alternative options to formal on-campus examinations, including practical examinations, will be made available to students where possible.

Staff (changes for 2021/22 entry)

No changes are expected to the general level of experience or status of staff involved in delivering the course.

Staff are engaged in Continuous Professional Development activities to develop their teaching expertise, as part of the normal enhancement processes, to ensure that course teams have the required breadth of expertise.

Fees, funding and additional costs (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Tuition fees

There will be no changes to published tuition fees for 2021/22.

Additional costs (e.g. field trips, materials, equipment, etc.)

As we transition from the pandemic restrictions, we expect to be able to increase student access to on-campus facilities. Students will therefore have access to University computers and library facilities.

If, due to an increase in social distancing requirements or the enforcing of a lockdown, it becomes necessary to significantly increase the proportion of teaching delivered online, students will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online teaching and learning activities. Students who are able to travel will have access to computers on campus, however, it should be noted that access to on-campus facilities might be restricted if social distancing requirements are enforced.

The University is committed to supporting students who are unable to access suitable technology to ensure equity of access in a blended delivery mode.

Funding

There will be no changes to any existing University funding arrangements for 2021/22. Currently there are no indications from the UK government that there will be any changes to government funding arrangements.

Fees and funding for international students

There will be no changes to published tuition fees or funding arrangements specifically relating to international students for 2021/22.

Work placements and field trips (changes for 2021/22 entry)

We are anticipating that placements (including work and clinical placements) and field trips included as part of the course will go ahead in 2021/22. However, to ensure students gain maximum value from placement activities, it may be necessary to reschedule them to later in the year, when any impacts from the pandemic restrictions are minimised.

Any proposed changes to placements or field trips would go through the University's agreed processes where the impact of the change will be carefully considered.

In the interests of the health and wellbeing of our students, all placement arrangements must be approved by the University's insurers and the appropriate risk assessments made before students are sent on a placement.

Courses which require placements or field trips to be completed in order to pass relevant modules will have contingency plans in place in the event that a placement or field trip cannot be completed due to another lockdown or more stringent social distancing measures.

Award, qualification and accreditation (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Qualification

No changes will be made to the qualification awarded, e.g. BSc (Hons), MSc, etc., as a direct result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to courses, including the qualification awarded (although very rare), as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area. Any changes made to the qualification awarded for the course will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

Accreditation

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and in accordance with any professional body requirements. We do not anticipate making any further changes to courses in response to any issues arising from the pandemic and which would put at risk any professional body accreditation status.

Additional (changes for 2021/22 entry)

International students should maintain awareness of the UK government's and their home country's government advice on possible travel restrictions. The University will closely monitor advice and guidance published by the UK government and assess its impact on our international students. Appropriate advice and guidance will be provided as and when required.