Social Work BA (Hons) Integrated Degree Apprenticeship

Why choose this programme?

This is a unique and bespoke programme co-produced with London employers. The programme is designed to ensure you are supported by both your employers and the University to gain knowledge, skills and qualities that make for an effective social work practitioner who is sought after by employers. After successful completion, you will be recommended for registration with Social Work England as a social worker.

Typically, you'll spend one day with the University, and the rest of your time will be at your place of employment. There will also be some blocks of teaching and study during the programme.

Three work-based learning modules, supported by your employer, will develop your own social work knowledge and skills to inform your practice. The programme leads to the award of a BA (Hons) Social Work (Degree Apprenticeship) and a professional qualification through End-Point Assessment (EPA).

Attendance Year of entry
3 years (University and workplace) 2022
Location Kingston Hill and London Social Work partners

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • Learn on the job to become a qualified Social Worker.
  • You can earn while you learn.
  • Study a programme which has been designed solely for the needs of apprentices.
Reasons to choose Kingston University

Accreditation

The programme is approved by Social Work England. On completion, the apprentice will have fully satisfied the educational base for Social Work training and following satisfactory fulfilment of the End Point Assessment, successful apprentices would be eligible to apply to Social Work England for professional registration as a social worker.

What you will study

You will gain a foundation in ethics, diversity, psychology, sociology, social policy and law for social work practice. You will study best practice with adults and children, engaging with areas such as mental health, disability, adoption and fostering, substance misuse, children in conflict with the law, and domestic violence.

This degree apprenticeship is designed to support learning both at the work place where you will spend 80% of your time learning on the job in work-based settings with your employer, and at the University where you will spend a minimum of 20% of your time engaged in off-the-job learning attending Kingston University taught sessions. Some of the modules are taught in 5-day and 10-day blocks.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

In your first year, the modules will help prepare you for social work, enabling you to develop a repertoire of professional responses that can be used in practice. You will be introduced to theories of human development, law, policy and ethics. Alongside these modules, you will take a work based learning module that allows you to demonstrate practice skills mapped against the readiness for direct practice level, followed by the first placement level of the social work professional capability framework (PCF).

Core modules

Transitions into Social Work

30 credits

This is the first module on the programme. It is designed to prepare apprentices for the transition into the social work apprenticeship degree by aiding the development of their professional identities. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards.

This module will support apprentices to develop a repertoire of professional responses that will be developed in practice.

The focus is on developing a deeper understanding of the apprentice's professional identities. Apprentices will engage in activities that take them beyond knowledge of the social worker role, to an understanding of what it means to personally and professionally enter into the social work profession, along with the natural shifts in power and inherent tensions in any new role. Active reflection on values, attitudes, expectations and beliefs will guide apprentices to develop their ‘professional selves'.

Foundational Skills and Knowledge for Practice: Development Across the Lifespan

30 credits

This module is designed to introduce apprentices to theories, research and models that inform both apprentices' understanding of human development, patterns of human behaviour, as well as inform interventions and decisions in the workplace. The module encourages apprentices to develop an analytical approach to learning in preparation for developing professional practice. The application of critical thinking tools will aid apprentices to evaluate the credibility and appropriateness of specific academic material to their observation.

Introduction to Law, Policy and Ethics for Practice

30 credits

In order to start developing legal literacy, apprentices will be guided to interpret information within the legislative frameworks and assess the extent to which given sets of facts meet certain legal criteria. Apprentices will have the opportunity to learn about the different policies that influence social work practice, the laws that determine what practitioners are able and are required to do as social workers and the legal impact of practice on the rights of individuals and families.

Apprentices will build upon prior learning using the module learning outcomes to demonstrate their preparation for their new role as a social work apprentice. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards.

Introduction to Social Work Practice: Work Based Learning with Employer

30 credits

This is the first of three modules on this course that enable apprentices to demonstrate practice skills against the nine domains of the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF) and the Integrated Degree Apprenticeship Standards for Social Workers. Apprentices will build upon prior learning using the module learning outcomes to demonstrate their preparation for their new role as an apprentice social worker. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards.

In this on the job learning module, apprentices will be supported by a mentor, sub-regional assessor (SRA), and their line manager and/or mentor to work through agreed learning objectives mapped against the appropriate levels of the PCF and apprenticeship standards. People with lived experience will be involved throughout.

You will learn about inter-professional work and develop a degree of practice agility to work effectively within different settings. You will learn to evaluate how social work models, theories and research inform planning, assessment, and interventions; and further develop knowledge on social work in action, developing your earlier legal learning and applying into a rights and justice based social work context.

You will also take a work based module where you will undertake a contrasting work based learning experience mapped against the second placement level requirements of the social work professional capability framework (PCF).

Core modules

Building Skills for Social Work Practice

30 credits

Apprentices will use the module learning outcomes to demonstrate their preparation for their role as a social work apprentice. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards.

This module builds on the knowledge apprentices gained in SWAD 4.2 (Development across the lifespan) Drawing on apprentices current practice, this module enables apprentices to further develop their ability to evaluate how social work models, research, and theories inform planning, assessment, and interventions. Drawing on the narrative accounts of those with lived experiences of social work, apprentices will be supported to increase their reflective awareness of how assumptions and biases promote or hinder outcomes. Apprentices will begin to build confidence and ability to understand complexity and risk while developing professional decision-making skills.

Interprofessional Working and Developing your Professional Identity

30 credits

This module builds on the Transitions module in year one and further develops apprentices' professional identity. Apprentices will develop behavioural skills, values and knowledge to work collaboratively within organisational systems as well as inter-professionally, while remaining accountable to their own organisations with a clear sense of social work identity. Apprentices will gain an understanding of the thread between organisational systems, research informed practice and, outcomes for people living with the experience of social work. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards.

Social Work in Action: Rights and Responsibilities in Practice

30 credits

This module builds on apprentices learning about law, policy and ethics from level 4 and translates earlier learning into a rights and justice based social work context. This will develop apprentices' legal literacy and the use of professional authority and make judgements within legal and ethical frameworks. All content is considered from national and international perspectives to ensure that apprentices are able to connect global forces that inform structural, legal and professional parameters. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards.

The final year of the course is in two parts. You will complete a module on consolidation of knowledge and skills for practice examined by an in-depth analysis of a case study from practice; and an integrated approaches to practice (a work-based module) both designed to aid the preparation for taking the End-Point Assessment (EPA).

Upon successful completion of the academic modules and gaining a total of 300 credits, apprentices are nominated by their employers to undertake the EPA. This is a 60 credit module that examines apprentices' suitability to gain the professional qualification in Social Work. As a gateway requirement, apprentices must achieve the specified English, and maths prior to taking the EPA.

Core modules

Consolidation of Knowledge and Skills for Practice

30 credits

This final year consolidation project enables apprentices to synthesise and apply the knowledge and skills that they have acquired throughout the apprenticeship programme by undertaking an in-depth analysis of a case study derived from work-based learning. This should be a case study that raises issues that related to a developing specialist area or interest to the apprentice. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards. This module is also designed to help apprentices prepare for the end point assessment by supporting the development of skills that will enable them to approach the end point assessment equipped with the necessary ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout the apprenticeship.

Integrated Approaches to Practice: On the Job Learning

30 credits

This is the third of three modules on this course that enable apprentices to demonstrate practice skills against the nine domains of the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF) and the Integrated Degree Apprenticeship Standards for Social Workers. Apprentices will build upon prior learning using the module learning outcomes to demonstrate their preparation for their role as a pre-qualifying apprentice social worker. Previous learning experiences will be re-contextualised to demonstrate how their knowledge, skills and behaviours apply within social workers' responsibility and accountability, as required by the professional regulator and the relevant standards.

End-Point Assessment

60 credits

This End-Point Assessment (EPA) is a requirement for all apprentices to gain their professional qualification in Social Work. The module is aligned to the Social Worker level 6 Integrated Degree Apprenticeship standard. Apprentices cannot successfully complete the bachelor's degree without passing the EPA. The EPA must be completed within a six-month period, after the apprentice has met the EPA requirements.

The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. The regulations governing this course are available on our website. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this may not be offered.

Entry requirements

Typical offer

  • GCSE English (normally English language) and mathematics grades 4–9 (or grade C or above for GCSEs taken before 2017); or equivalent qualification (e.g. Functional Skills Level 2 in numeracy and literacy). 
  • AND Learning at Level 3 by qualification OR two years of verifiable and relevant work experience. 
  • A 'Right to Work' covering the full length of the course and end point assessment (36 months) as this is a compulsory requirement of all apprenticeships
  • Disclosure and Barring Services (DBS) clearing (enhanced) and Occupational Health clearance will be required.

Additional requirements

  • Working in the sector.
  • Sponsorship from an approved employer within the industry.
  • Meeting all the requirements of the Education and Skills Funding Agency to undertake an apprenticeship as listed in the Apprenticeship Funding Rules.

International

Higher and Degree Apprenticeship programmes are not suitable for international applicants without the Right to Work in England. Applicants must be employed and individual employers will set the selection criteria for their apprenticeships. International applicants need to look at the details of each apprenticeship vacancy and contact the employer to check their eligibility criteria. Academically, students registering to the programme will need to meet the relevant entry criteria.

Teaching and assessment

Learning on this course will take place both in your place of work and at the University. You will spend 80% of your time learning on the job (work based learning with your employer) and at least 20% of your time learning off the job (attending Kingston University taught sessions or engaged in guided independent study).

Throughout your course, you will be supported by a team comprising of a university based Sub-Regional Assessor (SRA), a work based Line Manager and a work based Mentor. The SRA will be your academic and personal Tutor who will assess your on the job learning working closely with your line Manager, your Mentor and you to complete a Personal Learner Curriculum (PLC), a document that outlines support arrangements for both on the job and off the job learning to maximise your potential. Regular meetings will be held to review the PLC to ensure it is kept up to date.

During off the job learning, you will attend university delivered teaching sessions and participate in interactive seminars with other apprentices studying on this course. The university has a range of support systems including online learning resources to support you to prepare and submit work for assessment at the end of each module.

Guided independent study

When not attending timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for final assignments. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the online virtual learning platform.

Academic support

Our academic support team here at Kingston University provides help in a range of areas.

Dedicated personal tutor

When you arrive, we'll introduce you to your personal tutor. This is the member of academic staff who will provide academic guidance, be a support throughout your time at Kingston and who will show you how to make the best use of all the help and resources that we offer at Kingston University.

Your workload

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 1
  • On the job learning: 940 hours
  • Guided independent study: 210 hours
  • Scheduled teaching: 175 hours
Year 2
  • On the job learning: 1240 hours
  • Guided independent study: 230 hours
  • Scheduled teaching: 175 hours
Year 3
  • On the job learning: 575 hours
  • Guided independent study: 105 hours
  • Scheduled teaching: 75 hours

How you will be assessed

Assessment typically comprises exams (e.g. test or exam), practical (e.g. presentations, performance) and coursework (e.g. essays, reports, self-assessment, portfolios, dissertation). The approximate percentage for how you will be assessed on this programme is as follows, though depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 1
  • Coursework: 80%
  • Exams: 20%
Year 2
  • Coursework: 87%
  • Practical: 7%
  • Exams: 5%
Year 3
  • Coursework: 62%
  • Practical: 32%
  • Exams: 5%

Based on the Education and Skills Funding Agency funding rules your on-the-job training will also be assessed to ensure that it meets the requirements of the apprenticeship standard. You will also need to successfully complete an End-Point Assessment.

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Your timetable

Your individualised timetable is normally available to learners within 48 hours of enrolment. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 6pm.

Class sizes

To give you an indication of class sizes, this course normally attracts 60 learners and lecture sizes are normally 60. However this can vary by module and academic year.

Who teaches this programme?

Every member of the teaching staff has substantial practice experience in social work. In addition, many are actively involved in social work research, presenting regularly at conferences and publishing in books and journals. In addition, our course teams draw on the wealth of experience provided by our professional contacts and service users and carers who feed into the design of our courses and provide teaching and supervision to enrich your learning.

Programme fees and funding

2022/23 fees for this programme

This degree apprenticeship programme is funded through the Government's Apprenticeship Levy within the approved funding band.

Additional costs

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which learners will need to consider when planning their studies.

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees.

Where a programme has additional expenses, we make every effort to highlight them. These may include optional field trips, materials, security checks such as DBS, uniforms, specialist clothing or professional memberships.

Text books

Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. You may prefer to, or be required to, buy your own copy of key textbooks.

Computer equipment

There are open-access networked computers available across the University, plus laptops available to loan. You may find it useful to have your own PC, laptop or tablet which you can use around campus and in halls of residences. Free WiFi is available on each of the campuses.

Printing

In the majority of cases coursework can be submitted online. There may be instances when you will be required to submit work in a printed format. Printing and photocopying costs are not included in your tuition fees.

Travel

You may need to pay additional travel costs for placements. If you are an apprentice, you can apply for an apprenticeship oyster card.

Facilities

We collaborate across Kingston University and external organisations to come up with creative ideas to solve social care issues in the community, so that students are given the opportunity to apply their learning to real-world problems.

The Practice Learning Suite is a purpose-built facility where social work and social care students have the opportunity to learn and to practise key skills.

Facilities

Social Work Skills Lab

The skills lab is a purpose-built facility where social work students have the opportunity to learn and to practise key social work skills.

Social workers undertaking continuing professional development courses develop their assessment and intervention skills and other skills such as mentoring, teaching and providing reflective supervision.

What's available?

The skills lab is divided into several sections including:

  • a seminar/case conference room for a maximum of 20 people;
  • a simulated living-room and front door to assist in developing skills relating to home visits;
  • five interview rooms simulating work environments;
  • a control room with two-way mirror and viewing monitors; and
  • all rooms have fitted cameras and microphones so that activities can be recorded.

A flexible, creative space

The skills lab has been designed to be a multi-functional space which allows flexible use. The furniture is all portable and can be changed according to the simulated activities required.

The small rooms can be used for practising communication skills and simulating supervision sessions.

The large room can be used as a teaching or seminar room and can be set up as a simulated case conference room or duty desk.

Participants have the opportunity to engage in creative skills development activities and benefit from live supervision and feedback from the recorded material.

End-Point Assessment (EPA)

Each apprentice on an approved Apprenticeship Standard is required to take an End-Point Assessment (EPA) to complete the programme. The EPA is delivered by an End-Point Assessment Organisation (EPAO) that is registered with the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA).

The EPA is either integrated as part of the apprenticeship or completed after the course element. If an apprentice is completing the EPA after the course element, they must ensure they have successfully completed their learning, achieved the gateway requirements and finished uploading their evidence prior to taking the EPA.

What does an End-Point Assessment (EPA) involve?

There is no common format for an EPA, as they vary between apprenticeships. All EPAs are developed from 'assessment plans', drawn up by the trailblazer group responsible for apprenticeship standard and subsequently approved by the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education (IfATE).

An apprentice's EPA plan must detail the knowledge, skills and experience that they are expected to achieve as assessed by independent assessors. Employers have an important role in assessing competency and they have a key responsibility at the gateway in signing off the apprentice as ready to undertake EPA.

The EPA can be conducted either be awarding organisations, training providers like Kingston University, in case of integrated assessment, or End-Point Assessment Organisations (EPAOs). Without exception all should;

  • EPA must be conducted by an independent EPAO, which must be on the Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations. EPAOs will employ independent assessors.
  • Ensure independence – the EPA should be an independent assessment of an apprentice's competence. The decision on whether an apprentice has passed their EPA and what their final grade should be, must be taken by someone who has no vested interest in this decision or relationship to the apprentice. This is to ensure that all apprentices are treated fairly and helps to maintain trust in the robustness of the EPA system.
  • Underpin their EPA services with independent quality assurance.
  • Have relevant occupational experience of the apprenticeship standard.
  • Meet at least twice annually, review programme content and delivery, consider feedback from apprentices, employers and academics, and report findings annually to the University – through established committee structure and to employers.

Who provides a non-integrated assessment?

Employers can choose any organisation listed on the Register of End-Point Assessment Organisations (RoEPAO) against the apprenticeship standard being taken by their apprentice. RoEPAO lists organisations that have been assessed by the ESFA as being suitable to conduct independent EPA of apprentices. The employer can then inform Kingston University who will support the EPA process.

How is an integrated assessment different?

For apprenticeship that follow an integrated approach, the University delivering the apprenticeship will also be the EPAO and must be on the RoEPAO. Thus, integrated apprenticeships are where Kingston University provides both the scheduled teaching as well as the EPA. No independent assessor organisation is required – though the EPA still must still deliver an impartial result –with assessors independent of the apprentice and their employer and, where possible, the assessors come from a third-party organisation, for example, a professional body or another employer. If this is not possible, they may be sourced from within the same University but must be occupationally competent, meet any other conditions for assessors and not have been involved in the on-programme delivery.

For further details on EPA process for a particular apprenticeship programme please contact the relevant Apprenticeship Course Leader or Faculty Student/Degree Apprenticeship Officer. You can also get in touch with the Kingston University apprenticeships team via degreeapprenticeships@kingston.ac.uk or 020 8417 5492.

Local Employer Group (LEG)

The LEG was established to monitor, support and enhance the delivery and operation of the programme. This include management and periodically reviewing of work-based learning by this established local employer group with the aim of delivering an apprenticeship programme that is a high-quality satisfactory experience for all. Representatives of apprentices are invited to serve on the group. Terms of reference include:

In advance of each group meeting, the course administrator asks the apprentice representative to gather feedback from their fellow apprentices to be channelled through them at the meeting.

Next steps

Next steps

Employees

If you are currently employed full-time and would like to find out more about apprenticeships, please ask your employer to contact the Kingston University apprenticeship team.

Employers

If you are an employer interested in how apprenticeships can support your organisation and employees, please contact the apprenticeship team for further details.