Environmental Management MSc

Why choose this course?

The philosophy of the Environmental Management MSc programmes centres on the need for new environmental professionals: people with a strong cross-disciplinary understanding of the societal, economic, and environmental challenges posed by the emerging sustainable environmental management agenda.

The course aims to provide you with the in-depth knowledge and the essential practical and evaluative skills needed to give leadership for low carbon, resource efficient, sustainable futures in diverse global contexts. It will provide a good basis for careers in local government, NGOs, major international companies, independent consultants, and in education (such as research and enterprise).

The final masters award title will be reflected by your chosen pathway:

  • Environmental Management MSc  this core pathway explores the rationale behind the exploitation of natural environments. It provides you with detailed knowledge and understanding of the important relationships between sustainable environmental management and natural ecosystems and the value of adopting an integrated approach to studying both.
  • Environmental Management (Energy) MSc  this pathway is timely, nationally and internationally relevant, given the world's energy needs, as well as the surrounding political debates regarding fossil fuels and increasingly, renewables, which form such an essential component of the world's existence.
Mode Duration Attendance Start date
Full time 1 year Two days a week (Wednesday and Thursday) September 2021
January 2022
Full time 2 years including professional placement Two days a week (Wednesday and Thursday) plus placement year September 2021
January 2022
Part time 2 years One day a week (Wednesday or Thursday) September 2021
January 2022
Location Penrhyn Road

2021/22 entry

If you are planning to join this course in the academic year 2021/22 (i.e. between August 2021 and July 2022), please view the information about changes to courses for 2021/22 due to Covid-19.

 

Continuing students

Students who are continuing their studies with Kingston University in 2021/22 should refer to their Course Handbook for information about specific changes that have been, or may be, made to their course or modules being delivered in 2021/22. Course Handbooks are located within the Canvas Course page.

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • These courses meet the need for environmental professionals who understand the challenges of sustainable environmental management. They are accredited by the IEMA, a worldwide alliance of environment and sustainability professionals.
  • Kingston has established and active links with European and American Universities, ensuring the courses are globally relevant.
  • These courses offer practical fieldwork experience.

Please note: fieldwork will incur an additional cost. Details can be found in relevant module guides or from the course director.

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA). IEMA is the professional body for everyone working in environment and sustainability. This course entitles students to FREE student membership for the duration of the course and on successful completion you qualify for GradIEMA. Graduate membership is a launchpad for future leaders within environment and sustainability and offers a range of benefits to support you throughout your career. You can then "fast track" to Practitioner Membership.

What you will study

You will study the theoretical, practical and legal frameworks promoting sustainable environmental management and other drivers for sustainable behaviour at individual, institutional and governmental scales. You will learn how to innovate, respond to new and emerging challenges and work effectively in changing and unfamiliar situations.

The programme is made up of four modules, each worth 30 credits, and a research project module worth 60 credits. You will be able to choose from modules which explore aspects of sustainable environmental management, such as water, energy and land resources management and climate change.

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

For a student to go on placement they are required to pass every module first time with no reassessments. It is the responsibility of individual students to find a suitable paid placement. Students will be supported by our dedicated placement team in securing this opportunity.

Environmental Management MSc (Core pathway)

Environmental Management (Energy) MSc

Core modules

Environmental Management

30 credits

This module explores the motivations for, and paradigms of, 'sustainable development' at scales ranging from local to global including its grounding in economics, the social environment, in environmental politics and policy making as underpinned by law.

Water, Energy and Land Resources Management

30 credits

This module examines the relationship between water, energy and land (including the WEL-nexus), associated environmental management challenges and sustainable management solutions. The module will develop an understanding and critical evaluation of these challenges at a variety of scales through the systematic investigation of the component challenges (water, energy and land), the interface between the components and their relationship to sustainable development.

Research Methods and Techniques

30 credits

This module provides basic skills in research methods and techniques, including geographical information system (GIS) for data storage, manipulation and display. It initially develops GIS skills by introducing GIS concepts, sources for geographical information and outlines basic spatial concepts. Subsequently the module encompasses the theoretical underpinnings to research methods and techniques, including sampling schemes, measurements, quality control issues, and data collection, manipulation and analysis. This together with practical elements of designing research proposals and data testing enables the necessary skills for carrying out independent research work.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Evaluate the use of GIS in the capture, storage and handling, manipulation and analysis of geographical information.
  • Critically discuss what a GIS is and develop an understanding of its relevance to key application areas.
  • Apply the latest developments in geographical database technology to geographical database case studies.
  • Synthesise the literature on a specific topic and identify key researchable issues relating to the literature review.
  • With respect to one researchable issue, develop aims and objectives and relevant research methodologies for a specific research project to enable them to meet their aims and objectives.
  • Manipulate data using a computer and select, execute and interpret results of appropriate data analytical methods.
The Challenge of Climate Change

30 credits

This module reviews current ideas on climate change and its implications for society. The complexities of this debate and their relevance to a sustainable future for human societies, and to ecosystems and planetary well being, more generally, are explored. Keynote lectures will introduce the science of climate change; uncertainties and challenges in global climate change modelling; implications of climate change predictions; appropriate societal responses; and 'best' strategies for mitigating potential climate change and its impacts. The challenges of policy-making against a background of uncertain science are explored through case studies and role-play scenarios and by site visits.

Research Project

60 credits

This final module provides students with the opportunity to design and execute an original research ‘capstone' project related to their own discipline specific interests, which synthesises their learning. They will develop a theoretically informed body of work that integrates both theory and practice. It may take the form of a dissertation, practice project, or experiment-based project. Following submission students present their findings at a Masters Students Conference.

Optional modules

Professional Placement

120 credits

The Professional Placement module is a core module for those students following a masters programme that incorporates an extended professional placement. It provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in an appropriate working environment, and develops and enhances key employability and subject specific skills in their chosen discipline. Students may wish to use the placement experience as a platform for the major project or future career.

It is the responsibility of individual students to find and secure a suitable placement opportunity; this should not normally involve more than two placements which must be completed over a minimum period of 10 months and within a maximum of 12 months. The placement must be approved by the Course Leader, prior to commencement to ensure its suitability. Students seeking placements will have access to the standard placement preparation activities offered by Student Engagement and Enhancement (SEE) group.

Read more about the postgraduate work placement scheme.

Core modules

Environmental Management

30 credits

This module explores the motivations for, and paradigms of, 'sustainable development' at scales ranging from local to global including its grounding in economics, the social environment, in environmental politics and policy making as underpinned by law.

Water, Energy and Land Resources Management

30 credits

This module examines the relationship between water, energy and land (including the WEL-nexus), associated environmental management challenges and sustainable management solutions. The module will develop an understanding and critical evaluation of these challenges at a variety of scales through the systematic investigation of the component challenges (water, energy and land), the interface between the components and their relationship to sustainable development.

Research Methods and Techniques

30 credits

This module provides basic skills in research methods and techniques, including geographical information system (GIS) for data storage, manipulation and display. It initially develops GIS skills by introducing GIS concepts, sources for geographical information and outlines basic spatial concepts. Subsequently the module encompasses the theoretical underpinnings to research methods and techniques, including sampling schemes, measurements, quality control issues, and data collection, manipulation and analysis. This together with practical elements of designing research proposals and data testing enables the necessary skills for carrying out independent research work.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Evaluate the use of GIS in the capture, storage and handling, manipulation and analysis of geographical information.
  • Critically discuss what a GIS is and develop an understanding of its relevance to key application areas.
  • Apply the latest developments in geographical database technology to geographical database case studies.
  • Synthesise the literature on a specific topic and identify key researchable issues relating to the literature review.
  • With respect to one researchable issue, develop aims and objectives and relevant research methodologies for a specific research project to enable them to meet their aims and objectives.
  • Manipulate data using a computer and select, execute and interpret results of appropriate data analytical methods.
Energy Management

30 credits

Critically evaluates current ideas in the field of energy (eg production, conservation, economic value and the "energy trilemma"), relating to conventional and non-conventional hydrocarbons; nuclear power; and other alternatives such as wind, wave, geothermal and tidal.

Research Project

60 credits

This final module provides students with the opportunity to design and execute an original research ‘capstone' project related to their own discipline specific interests, which synthesises their learning. They will develop a theoretically informed body of work that integrates both theory and practice. It may take the form of a dissertation, practice project, or experiment-based project. Following submission students present their findings at a Masters Students Conference.

Optional modules

Professional Placement

120 credits

The Professional Placement module is a core module for those students following a masters programme that incorporates an extended professional placement. It provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in an appropriate working environment, and develops and enhances key employability and subject specific skills in their chosen discipline. Students may wish to use the placement experience as a platform for the major project or future career.

It is the responsibility of individual students to find and secure a suitable placement opportunity; this should not normally involve more than two placements which must be completed over a minimum period of 10 months and within a maximum of 12 months. The placement must be approved by the Course Leader, prior to commencement to ensure its suitability. Students seeking placements will have access to the standard placement preparation activities offered by Student Engagement and Enhancement (SEE) group.

Read more about the postgraduate work placement scheme.

The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. The regulations governing this course are available on our website. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this may not be offered.

Work placement scheme

Many postgraduate courses at Kingston University allow students to do a 12-month work placement as part of their course. The responsibility for finding the work placement is with the student; we cannot guarantee the work placement, just the opportunity to undertake it. As the work placement is an assessed part of the course, it is covered by a student's Tier 4 visa.

Find out more about the postgraduate work placement scheme.

Entry requirements

Typical offer

A good honours degree (2.2 or better) or equivalent in a relevant discipline, such as biology, chemistry, geography, Earth sciences, environmental geography, environmental management, environmental sciences, natural resource management, sustainable development, as the major field(s) of study or a relevant professional qualification, with suitable work experience.

Where applicants have relevant work experience and/or professional qualifications in the field of environmental management, water resources management, energy management and sustainability or related fields may be presented for evaluation against Kingston University's mechanisms and processes for Recognition of Prior Certificated Learning (RPCL) and Recognition of Prior Experiential Learning (RPEL).

International

In order to complete your programme successfully, it is important to have a good command of English and be able to apply this in an academic environment. Therefore, if you are a non-UK applicant* you will usually be required to provide certificated proof of English language competence before commencing your studies.

For this course you must pass IELTS academic test in English with an overall score of 6.5, with no element below 6.0, or meet the scores listed on the alternative online tests. Please note that we do not accept Standard XII as proof of Academic English.

Applicants who do not meet the English language requirements may be eligible to join our pre-sessional English language course.

Please make sure you read our full guidance about English language requirements, which includes details of other qualifications we'll consider.

* Applicants from one of the recognised majority English speaking countries (MESCs) do not need to meet these requirements.

Teaching and assessment

Guided independent study

When not attending timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for exams. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the online virtual learning platform.

Support for postgraduate students

As a student at Kingston University, we will make sure you have access to appropriate advice regarding your academic development. You will also be able to use the University's support services

Your workload

Type of teaching and learning

Year 1

Year 1
  • Scheduled teaching: 382 hours
  • Guided independent study: 1418 hours

21% of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity.

How you will be assessed

Assessment typically comprises exams (eg test or exam), practical (eg presentations, performance) and coursework (eg essays, reports, self-assessment, portfolios, dissertation). The approximate percentage for how you will be assessed on this course is as follows, though depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose:

Type of assessment

Core pathway

Energy pathway

Core pathway
  • Coursework: 94%
  • Exams: 6%
Energy pathway
  • Coursework: 86%
  • Exams: 14%

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Class sizes

­You will be part of an intimate cohort of students which provides dedicated academic guidance and advice as well as the opportunity to build a life-long network of colleagues. Some modules are common across other postgraduate programmes, therefore you may be taught alongside postgraduates from other courses.

Who teaches this course?

This course is delivered by the School of Engineering and the Environment in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing.

The Faculty's wide selection of undergraduate and postgraduate courses covers a diverse range of subject areas, from aerospace to geography; from maths and computing to biotechnology; and many more. Our collaborative set-up provides new opportunities for our students, and we design our courses with industry professionals to ensure you stay up to date with the latest developments.

School of Engineering and the Environment

The School of Engineering and the Environment prides itself on the high quality of its teaching, as recognised by the excellent and satisfactory awards in various subject reviews undertaken by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) on behalf of the Higher Education Funding Council.

The School has invested in developing its labs for both teaching and research, including:

  • facilities for environmental monitoring, geology, geochemistry, and mapping/GIS/computing; and
  • specialist instrumentation laboratories (eg nuclear metrology; laser raman spectroscopy; and 3D mapping).

Postgraduate students may run or assist in lab sessions and may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

Facilities

There is a wide range of facilities for practical work at our Penrhyn Road campus, where this course is based. You will have access to a modern environment with the latest equipment, including:

  • the £9.8 million Eadweard Muybridge building with state-of the art laboratories, including labs dedicated to environmental science and geochemistry;
  • new work areas and dedicated laboratories for research;
  • specialist equipment, such as
    • ICP-AES and ICP-MS analytical facility;
    • scanning microscopy (SEM and TEM) and electron microprobe equipment; and
    • laser raman microprobe, fluid inclusion and cathodoluminesence equipment;
  • computing laboratories and a team of IT technicians to offer assistance.

Where this course will take you

Graduates are expected to find extensive career opportunities with NGOs, governmental organisations, businesses, industry and education or as independent consultants and advisers. Recent graduates are employed at local councils as environmental sustainability officers or waste management officers.

Careers and recruitment advice

The Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing has a specialist employability team. It provides friendly and high-quality careers and recruitment guidance, including advice and sessions on job-seeking skills such as CV preparation, application forms and interview techniques. Specific advice is also available for international students about the UK job market and employers' expectations and requirements.

The team runs employer events throughout the year, including job fairs, key speakers from industry and interviews on campus. These events give you the opportunity to hear from, and network with, employers in an informal setting. 

Fees for this course

2021/22 fees for this course

Home 2021/22

  • MSc full time £9,430
  • MSc part time £5,187

International 2021/22

  • MSc full time £14,900
  • MSc part time £8,195

2020/21 fees for this course

Home and European Union 2020/21

  • MSc full time £9,200
  • MSc part time £5,060

Overseas (not EU) 2020/21

  • MSc full time £14,500
  • MSc part time £7,975

Fees for the optional placement year

If you choose to take a placement as part of this course, you will be invoiced for the placement fee in Year 2. Find out more about the postgraduate work placement scheme and the costs for the placement year.

Additional costs

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees.

Where a course has additional expenses, we make every effort to highlight them. These may include optional field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering), security checks such as DBS, uniforms, specialist clothing or professional memberships.

Text books

Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. You may prefer to, or be required to, buy your own copy of key textbooks.

Computer equipment

There are open-access networked computers available across the University, plus laptops available to loan. You may find it useful to have your own PC, laptop or tablet which you can use around campus and in halls of residences. Free Wi-Fi is available on each of the campuses.

Printing

In the majority of cases coursework can be submitted online. There may be instances when you will be required to submit work in a printed format. Printing and photocopying costs are not included in your tuition fees.

Travel

Travel costs are not included but we do have a free intersite bus service which links the campuses and halls of residence.

Funding and bursaries

Kingston University offers a range of postgraduate scholarships, including:

If you are an international student, find out more about scholarships and bursaries.

We also offer the following discounts for Kingston University alumni:

What our graduates say

Prior to the masters, I did a lot of volunteering in the environmental sector in an attempt to help me clarify my career direction. However, it was the MSc itself that pointed the way.

I graduated with an MSc in Environment & Earth Resources Management (now Environmental Management) in 2012. It was an extremely intense year of study and self-discovery, and I enjoyed (and I dare say savoured) every single moment. Prior to the masters, I did a lot of volunteering in the environmental sector in an attempt to help me clarify my career direction. However, it was the MSc itself that pointed the way.

As soon as I attended the first 'Water Resources Management' lecture, I knew I wanted to work in freshwater conservation. I wrote my dissertation in a water topic and received a distinction. This gave me a lot of confidence to go out there and pursue my newly found passion. After graduation, I worked briefly in water policy and in 2014 I moved on to a more hands-on 'project officer' role at a Rivers Trust in SE England where I was able to implement sustainable catchment management activities that helped improve the overall water environment of the river catchment.

I now work as an Education Officer at the Wessex Chalk Stream & Rivers Trust and my passion for freshwater conservation is still as fresh as back in 2012 when I discovered it at Kingston University.

Veronika Moore

Without having undertaken the masters at Kingston, I would not have been able to make this change. I was working in the oil industry and had been through several phases of redundancy. I was based in an office and wanted a career with the opportunity to work outside, as well as to be able to assess and analyse data. As a result, I chose to undertake the masters in Environmental and Earth Resource Management at Kingston University.

The course gave me the flexibility to continue working whilst learning new skills. It offered a variety of subjects and the one which I enjoyed the most was in Contaminated Land. Within months of finishing the course, I was able to secure a position with a contaminated land consultancy and embarked upon a career that combines site work, data assessment and reporting.

Since then, I have worked on complex and challenging investigation and remediation projects, not just in the United Kingdom, but also in Europe, Africa and India. It is a career that is both interesting and rewarding. Without having undertaken the masters at Kingston, I would not have been able to make this change.

Robert Glavin

Current research in this subject

  • Research associated with solid waste management.
  • Investigations into effects of land-use change on decline in biodiversity and species extinctions.
  • Research associated with biogeochemical cycling of trace elements and nutrients in terrestrial and aquatic environments.
  • Investigations into understanding the underlying processes of metal/nutrient transfer between soil and plants; investigations into the long-term behaviour of metals in soils.
  • Investigations into understanding the underlying processes of metal/nutrient transfer between soil and water.
  • Research into the long-term behaviour of land use impacts on diffused water pollution.
  • Investigations into sustainable water uses in developing countries (eg South Africa).
  • Research on desalinisation in developing-world context.
  • Research on globally relevant topics associated with conventional energies, renewable energies and sustainable energies.
  • Exploring the importance of protected areas in tropical developing countries.

Research in the Centre for Earth and Environmental Science Research (CEESR)

Research forms part of the Centre for Earth and Environmental Science Research (CEESR). Research falls into three different groups:

  • geodynamics and crustal processes - including tectonics, basin evolution and applications of palaeomagnetism to global geodynamics;
  • environmental change - including remote sensing of land cover change in tropical and temperate ecosystems and human impacts on watercourses and soils in Britain; and
  • agriculture, environment and people - including the human, environmental and policy dynamics of rural systems.

Events and lectures

  • Students can attend bi-weekly Departmental Seminar Series (ie CEESR).
  • Students are invited to the annual CEESR Seminar.

Changes to courses for 2021/22 due to Covid-19

Course information (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Composition of the course

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and, therefore, we do not anticipate having to make any further changes to the course, i.e. number of modules or credits in a year, in response to issues arising from the pandemic. However, if this becomes necessary, the changes will be highlighted to students via email before enrolment.

Unless government advice instructs otherwise, Study Abroad programmes will take place in 2021/22. The safety of all our students is paramount, therefore, as per normal practice, all Study Abroad activities must also be approved by the University's insurers to ensure that students are adequately protected during their period abroad. We will provide updates as the pandemic situation stabilises and/or further government advice is released.

Changes can be made to courses as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and in response to feedback from students and other key stakeholders. Any such changes made to the composition of the course will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

Modules

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and, therefore, we do not anticipate having to make any further changes to module titles and summaries or to the availability of modules in response to issues arising from the pandemic.

Changes can be made to modules as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to module titles, module summaries and/or availability of modules will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

Length of course

We expect to deliver the course within the planned timescales to enable successful students to progress through and graduate from the course without delay.

In exceptional circumstances the sequence of learning and teaching activities may be changed in 2021/22, e.g. moving those modules which can be delivered more effectively to the first teaching block and moving back those – such as practical modules and placements – which may be more difficult to deliver due to some ongoing restrictions.

In some cases, it may be necessary to delay placement modules which may then impact the length of the course. In these circumstances the University will guide students through the appropriate options available to ensure students are able to make informed choices.

Entry requirements (changes for 2021/22 entry)

We have not changed entry requirements as a direct result of the pandemic.

Entry requirements for international students

We have not changed entry requirements for international students as a direct result of the pandemic.

Teaching (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Changes to the way the course will be delivered

As we transition from the pandemic restrictions, we expect to steadily increase the proportion of on-campus teaching. We will continue to provide a proportion of online learning, as experience has shown that this enriches and supports the student learning experience.

If the pandemic affects teaching and learning activities in 2021/22 more than we currently anticipate, the proportion of online learning will increase. However, unless a lockdown is enforced, we will ensure that all courses provide a reasonable percentage of their teaching and learning activities on campus.

Should your circumstances prevent your attendance at on-campus sessions, you should still be able to engage with your course remotely in a way that allows you to progress. Where this is not possible, for example on courses with high practical content, your course team will be able to advise you on the options available to you.

Changes to teaching in the event of a further lockdown or adjustments in government advice

The University will continue to closely monitor government announcements and advice in relation to the pandemic and, where required, will take any necessary action in order to comply with such advice.

In the event that a further lockdown is enforced in 2021/22 the University will aim to deliver the course fully online once more. The majority of our courses are prepared to be delivered fully online if the situation requires it. Where the quality of the student experience may be compromised, or the course is unable to be delivered fully online, the University may need to suspend the delivery of that course until a time that it can be delivered. Students will be supported in these situations to ensure they are able to make the right choices for their particular circumstances.

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for Year 1

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled learning and teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours were not and will not be made as a direct result of the pandemic.

‘Scheduled learning and teaching' includes teaching delivered online, either live or recorded/on demand.

Timetable

Your individualised timetable for teaching block 1 (i.e. up to December 2021) should be available by the end of August. Timetables for teaching block 2 (i.e. from January 2022) will not be available until the autumn. We make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible.

In 2020/21 it was agreed that scheduled learning and teaching could take place on any day of the week between 9am and 9pm, to maximise the time available for teaching in order to accommodate smaller group sizes and social distancing. This meant we sometimes had to use Wednesday afternoons and enrichment week for additional teaching slots. If we need to accommodate smaller group sizes and social distancing in 2021/22 we expect to adopt a similar approach. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Assessment (changes for 2021/22 entry)

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and, therefore, do not anticipate having to make any further changes to the course, i.e. to the overall methods of assessments, in response to issues arising from the pandemic. However, if this becomes necessary, the changes will be highlighted to students via email before enrolment.

Changes are made to modules, including how they are assessed, as part of normal enhancement processes to keep our modules up to date with current developments in that subject area and in response to feedback received from students and other key stakeholders. Any changes to the overall methods of assessment for Year 1 of the course will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

If social distancing or lockdown restrictions are in place in 2021/22, online alternative options to formal on-campus examinations, including practical examinations, will be made available to students where possible.

Staff (changes for 2021/22 entry)

No changes are expected to the general level of experience or status of staff involved in delivering the course.

Staff are engaged in Continuous Professional Development activities to develop their teaching expertise, as part of the normal enhancement processes, to ensure that course teams have the required breadth of expertise.

Fees, funding and additional costs (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Tuition fees

There will be no changes to published tuition fees for 2021/22.

Additional costs (e.g. field trips, materials, equipment, etc.)

As we transition from the pandemic restrictions, we expect to be able to increase student access to on-campus facilities. Students will therefore have access to University computers and library facilities.

If, due to an increase in social distancing requirements or the enforcing of a lockdown, it becomes necessary to significantly increase the proportion of teaching delivered online, students will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online teaching and learning activities. Students who are able to travel will have access to computers on campus, however, it should be noted that access to on-campus facilities might be restricted if social distancing requirements are enforced.

The University is committed to supporting students who are unable to access suitable technology to ensure equity of access in a blended delivery mode.

Funding

There will be no changes to any existing University funding arrangements for 2021/22. Currently there are no indications from the UK government that there will be any changes to government funding arrangements.

Fees and funding for international students

There will be no changes to published tuition fees or funding arrangements specifically relating to international students for 2021/22.

Work placements and field trips (changes for 2021/22 entry)

We are anticipating that placements (including work and clinical placements) and field trips included as part of the course will go ahead in 2021/22. However, to ensure students gain maximum value from placement activities, it may be necessary to reschedule them to later in the year, when any impacts from the pandemic restrictions are minimised.

Any proposed changes to placements or field trips would go through the University's agreed processes where the impact of the change will be carefully considered.

In the interests of the health and wellbeing of our students, all placement arrangements must be approved by the University's insurers and the appropriate risk assessments made before students are sent on a placement.

Courses which require placements or field trips to be completed in order to pass relevant modules will have contingency plans in place in the event that a placement or field trip cannot be completed due to another lockdown or more stringent social distancing measures.

Award, qualification and accreditation (changes for 2021/22 entry)

Qualification

No changes will be made to the qualification awarded, e.g. BSc (Hons), MSc, etc., as a direct result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to courses, including the qualification awarded (although very rare), as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area. Any changes made to the qualification awarded for the course will be highlighted to students by email before enrolment.

Accreditation

The experience of delivering courses in 2020/21 under the various Covid-19 restrictions has enabled us to better prepare and plan the delivery of our courses in 2021/22. We are confident the course can be delivered as planned and in accordance with any professional body requirements. We do not anticipate making any further changes to courses in response to any issues arising from the pandemic and which would put at risk any professional body accreditation status.

Additional (changes for 2021/22 entry)

International students should maintain awareness of the UK government's and their home country's government advice on possible travel restrictions. The University will closely monitor advice and guidance published by the UK government and assess its impact on our international students. Appropriate advice and guidance will be provided as and when required.