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Law LLB(Hons) with professional experience

Attendance UCAS code Year of entry
3 years full time M100 Clearing 2018
2019
4 years full time with study exchange M103 Clearing 2018
2019

Why choose this course?

This course offers a qualifying law degree that is recognised by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.

It will enable you to progress to the vocational stage of legal training if you aim to become a barrister or solicitor. A Kingston University law degree is also a great foundation for a career in business, industry and administration.

Alongside your course you will also develop your professional experience. You will have the opportunity to undertake two professional internships (depending on availability) or a professional module. The professional modules consist of professional and personal skills training that will help you prepare for the world of work after you graduate. You'll also have the opportunity to spend a year studying abroad.

Our Professional Readiness Programme will help you develop new skills to prepare for internships and employment. You will take workshops on developing your own brand, networking to create opportunities, maximising your potential and understanding the legal sector and career paths. We will also encourage you to gain a full university experience by participating in conferences and events organised by our research groups.

All this is within the same three years as a traditional degree. However you'll gain more practical experience and develop the skills employers value most.

What you will study

You will get experience for the world of work through studying the foundations of legal knowledge – Public Law, Criminal Law, Law of Tort, Law of Contract, Land Law, EU Law, and Equity and Trusts.

Year 1 introduces the English Legal System and Method, including access and use of legal materials. Public Law covers the UK's constitution and relationships between individuals and state. Law of Tort considers civil wrongs (eg. negligence, nuisance, occupier's liability). Law of Contract explores binding agreements and breaches.

You can also choose to undertake an internship or professional module. The internship will give you professional experience in a law firm or in a law-related field. The professional module covers topics including: Professional Practice and Ethics, Mediation, and Dealing with and Managing change.

In Year 2, your Land Law module will cover property ownership, use and rights. In the Criminal Law module you will study murder, theft and sexual crimes. EU Law considers the single market (informed by recent politics). You will also have the opportunity to follow your own interest through an option module. Current students have the choice between International and Comparative Law, Medical Law or Commercial Law. You may also choose to undertake an internship or professional module.

In Year 3, everyone will study Equity and Trusts which considers wills, charitable trusts, and trustees. For the rest of the year you will be able to shape your degree around what interests you the most. You will pick one compulsory module (eg. Jurisprudence, Law Reform Project or Remedies and Restitution), and two optional modules. Current options include International Trade Law, Employment Law and Dispute Resolution.

Years 1 and 2 last until mid-July, not June, providing time for internships or professional modules. You will graduate at the same time as those with other degrees, but with invaluable practical experience.

Law degree programme schedule

  Quarter 1 Quarter 2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4
  Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept
Year 1 Professional pathway
Level 4 (Introduction) Professional experience  
Business Readiness  
Year 2 Professional pathway
Level 5 (Key) Professional experience  
Business Readiness  
Year 3 Professional pathway
Level 6 (Specialist) Professional skills Graduation

Module listing

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

If you undertake and pass the final-year mediation module (Dispute Resolution), you may qualify for an additional qualification – the National Certificate in Mediation Theory and Practice award. This module provides an opportunity to evaluate methods for resolving conflicts and to gain practical knowledge of mediation. Conflict management skills are increasingly important for dealing with workplace disputes.

Year 1

  • This first-year module provides the incoming student with sufficient understanding of the English legal system (ELS) - courts, procedure and sources of law - in order to make sense of their legal studies. It also provides a toolkit of legal method, meaning skills for legal research and writing in their other academic legal studies and in legal practice. Many of these skills, such as research, report organisation and effective writing, are also transferable employability skills. 

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  • The law of contract is the law of legally enforceable agreements and is at the heart of the English common law. It is one of the seven foundations of legal knowledge and invariably forms part of any degree with an overt legal content. It describes the rules which govern commercial activity, allowing businesses and consumers to maintain stable, consistent relationships over time and over distance. These rules encompass the complex multi-party arrangements for the construction of a stadium, and the employment of the cleaners and the star players, as well as the purchase of a hot dog from a stall outside.

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  • This module is a core module on the LLB degree and is one of the foundations of legal knowledge subjects which lead to the award of a qualifying law degree.

    The module introduces students to the constitutional and administrative law of the United Kingdom through a study of the core constitutional principles present within the UK system and the control of executive action by the courts. Lectures will introduce the students to the core elements of the subject while tutorials will be used to explore these ideas in greater depth based on assigned reading (and the lecture material itself). The module provides an essential introduction to the study of law since the validity of any particular law is a function of a constitutional rule which establishes manner, form and necessary pedigree for what is to qualify as a valid particular or occasional law.

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  • Tort can be described as the area of civil law which provides a remedy for a party who has suffered the breach of a protected interest. The module focuses on the wide range of activity to which tort law applies and examines the remedies it provides for many different types of loss or harm. Tort is also one of the foundations of legal knowledge subjects required by the professional bodies as part of a qualifying law degree for those seeking entry to the legal profession.

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  • This module consists of up to 44 - 22 weeks of professional and personal skills training, designed to prepare students for their internship and to improve their employability after graduation. Students will experience a wide range of opportunities to enhance their skills, ensure they make the most of their potential, gain the best possible internship, and give them an edge in the job market after graduation. 

    During their training, they will build an on-line profile indicating their progress with their skills development.  Where appropriate, the skills work will be integrated with core curriculum activity. Students will work with faculty staff, including their personal tutor and the Professional Experience Office, to identify their skills requirements. In addition to the standard skills required by employers, there will be skills development linked to specific subject areas in law.

    It is a core part of the 'Professional Experience' part of the LLB with Professional Experience. 

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Year 2

  • Land law studies the nature of land, the history of the current legislative structure and third party interests in, on or over private land in England and Wales. It introduces the concepts behind ownership and use of private land.

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  • The subject matter of this module is the substantive criminal law; that is, the general principles of criminal liability, definitions of what constitutes particular crimes and how that law affects particular circumstances.  The module covers both the general principles of criminal liability and a number of specific offences.  This involves not only a critical examination of the law, but also, using hypothetical factual situations, its detailed appliation.  As part of the module, students are required to research a topic that does not form part of the taught syllabus and to provide advice in relation to a given situation.  Criminal law is one of the foundations of legal knowledge required as part of a qualifying law degree.

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  • European Union (EU) law has been an integral part of the applicable law in the United Kingdom since 1 January 1973. The law stemming from the treaties has had an increasing impact in all the member states as the competences of the European Union have expanded and the effectiveness of enforcement of EU law has increased. This course covers the core curriculum and falls into two parts.

    The material covered in the first semester describes and analyses the constitutional/institutional law of the European Union. This includes the legal principles developed by the Court of Justice of the European Union to ensure the uniformity and effectiveness of EU law and the general principles of EU law. The second half of the course examines the most important areas of substantive law adopted to ensure the completion of the internal market.

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  • This module consists of up to 22 weeks of professional and personal skills training, which follow on from the level 4 module and is designed to prepare students for their internship and to improve their employability after graduation. Students will experience a wide range of opportunities to enhance their skills, ensure they make the most of their potential, gain the best possible internship, and give them an edge in the job market after graduation.

    During their training, they will further build on their on-line profile indicating their progress with their skills development.  Where appropriate, the skills work will be integrated with core curriculum activity. Students will work with faculty staff, including their personal tutor and the Professional Experience Office, to identify their skills requirements. In addition to the standard skills required by employers, there will be skills development linked to specific subject areas in Law.

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  • Available options will vary each year depending on staff specialism.

    • This module is an elective for the LLB (Hons) programme and a core for the LLB (Hons) International programme. It aims to provide an understanding of how globalisation affects our lives, though a specific anaIysis of public international law, and the French, German and American legal systems.

      The module introduces students to the legal systems of France, Germany and the United States. The first part is spent on the legal history and sources of law of the legal systems. The second part covers the constitutional aspects as well as the court system in France, Germany and the US. This module consists of feedback/feedforward sessions and workshops. Workshops will focus on the comparative aspects of the legal systems.

      It then introduces students to public international law as a globalised legal system regulating the relations between states. It focuses first on the relevant institutions, the sources of international law as well as the concept of international legal personality and statehood. The substantive part consists mainly of the use of force, the title to territory, the right to self-determination as well as the law of the sea.

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Year 3

  • This module examines the idea of conscience in English law. It looks at how, historically equity developed from the authority of the King in order to ameliorate the problems caused by an increasingly inflexible common law, at a time when Parliament met infrequently. The concept of the trust where ownership is divided between legal and beneficial is examined looking at the conscience inspired constructive trust. The use of the trust in many contexts including charity law and the administration of trusts are investigated.

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  • Compulsory option choices (choose one):

    • This is a capstone module which draws together strands from the first two years of the law degree and integrates them with final year studies. It considers the response of English law to a range of different wrongs and adopts a critical stance, encouraging students to question the effectiveness of the range of remedies available. It complements the study of contract, tort, equity and public law by placing them within a single coherent whole.

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    • The "Law Reform Project" enables students to apply their intellectual skills and knowledge to identifying a legal or policy problem and in finding a reform agenda. They will also be required to develop employment related skills in relation to project management skills, innovative and strategic visioning, clear articulation of reports, engaging in cost/benefit analysis of their ideas, learning how to overcome risks and challenges involved in change, as well as a wider understanding of the impact of law in society and the formulation of legal solutions to real world problems. Students are encouraged, where appropriate, to engage with local community groups, pressure groups, practitioners, their placement employers or the Department of Law's community clinic or mediation unit in developing their proposals and identifying a viable reform agenda.

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    • Jurisprudence causes the students to take an analytical step back to address issues that may have been presupposed, or simply left unspoken, during their degree. Jurisprudence builds upon the black-letter subjects they have studied and places them in a theoretical and social context : it is a meta analysis of Law which pulls together themes from all of the areas they will have studied hitherto.

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  • Here are some of the modules that may be available for you to choose from. The choice varies from year to year.

    Note that any option module will require a minimum of 10 registered students in order to be run in 2018-19. If there are less than 10 registered students in an option module, then it will not be run, and the students who chose that module will be advised to choose alternative available option modules.

    • This module will be of interest to students who wish to study how the law regulates family life and how effective it is in doing so. The main features of this module are coverage of the formation and termination of marriage and civil partnership;  how occupation and ownership of the family home is regulated and how effective these remedies are in cases of domestic violence;  the law's approach to finance and property division on divorce and maintenance for children comparing this approach with the regulation of cohabitation. The module then goes on to consider legal parentage and parenthood, parental responsibility and the regulation of disputes between parents about their children. Finally, local authority provision for vulnerable children and those who are experiencing harm in their families is considered and  adoption as a solution for children who cannot live with their birth families will be covered. This module aims to consider the law in context of social policy as a means to encourage desired types of family behaviour.

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    • This module examines the most common juristic person, the company (limited by shares or guarantee and both public and private limited companies). The cornerstones of the module include critical evaluation of the role of the company as a separate legal juristic person, directors and their duties, shareholders and their legal remedies, employees and their position apropos the Companies Act 2006. Close examination is undertaken of the policy and reform process leading up to the enactment of the Companies Act 2006. Primary sources (statute and case law) and secondary sources (academic comment, reform discussion) are used at length during the module.

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    • This module is an option module at level 6. The focus of this module is the legal framework surrounding the employment relationship, in its formation, operation and termination.  The statutory and common law context of employment, including EU aspects, is considered, along with the now extensive law on discrimination. The main features of the module are the contract of employment, remedies for termination including unfair dismissal and wrongful dismissal, equality law and law relating to trade unions. The module is designed for students who are interested in discovering the practical problems concerning law at work in a modern flexible labour market. Employment law is of practical significance for all persons involved in the world of work. 

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    • The dispute resolution module makes extensive use made of role-play in order to develop a deeper understanding of the dynamics underlying conflicts and the process of dispute resolution. Comparisons are made with litigation and with other adversarial and quasi-judicial mechanisms so as to place mediation and negotiation in a proper context. Themes are identified and discussed, often in light of role-plays designed to bring these themes into play, and the social and psychological aspects are considered. The module also incorporates theories of conflict and conflict management, as well as the landscape of dispute resolution.

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    • This module is an elective which introduces students to the criminal law responsibility of private individuals (ICL) and their human rights protection (IHR) under international law.

      The first part aims to focus on essential aspects of ICL: the mechanisms of international criminal justice as well as substantive aspects. This will be achieved by exploring the sources as well as the fundamental principles of ICL, institutional aspects of ICL from the Nuremberg Tribunals to the international Criminal Court (ICC) as well as established international crimes (Genocide, Crimes against humanity and war crimes). 

      The second part aims to focus on essential aspects of IHR: it will contextualize the topic by examining the main international instruments which provide protection for human rights, substantive established human rights, the importance of the distinction between global and regional protection of human rights with a special focus on the European Convention of Human Rights as well as the mechanisms in place to protect and enforce these rights.

      The final part will provide a particular focus on a number of crimes analysed both from an ICL and IHR perspective, such as the crime of torture.

       It will be assessed both through a CW and a written examination.     

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You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University on a not-for-credit basis as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

Most of our undergraduate courses support studying or working abroad through the University's Study Abroad or Erasmus programme.

Find out more about where you can study abroad:

If you are considering studying abroad, read what our students say about their experiences.

Key information set

The scrolling banner(s) below display some key factual data about this course (including different course combinations or delivery modes of this course where relevant).

We aim to ensure that all courses and modules advertised are delivered. However in some cases courses and modules may not be offered. For more information about why, and when you can expect to be notified, read our Changes to Academic Provision.

A copy of the regulations governing this course is available here

Details of term dates for this course can be found here

Clearing hotline

0800 0483 334*

If you are calling from outside the UK, please call:

+44 20 8328 1149

*Calls are free from a landline. Mobile charges may apply – please check with your provider.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps

Clearing hotline

0800 0483 334*

If you are calling from outside the UK, please call:

+44 20 8328 1149

*Calls are free from a landline. Mobile charges may apply – please check with your provider.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps
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