Search our site
Search our site

Sociology BSc(Hons)

Attendance UCAS code/apply Year of entry
3 years full time L300 2019
2020
4 years full time including foundation year L301 2019
2020
4 years full time including sandwich year L302 2019
2020
6 years part time Apply direct to the University 2019
2020

Find out what it's like to study Sociology at Kingston University from a current student and a recent graduate:

Why choose this course?

    This Sociology course enables you to tackle global social problems like inequalities, migration, war, and climate change, alongside international issues.

    You will gain experience relevant to growing sectors such as think-tanks, NGOs, governmental and international organisations, and local and urban agencies.

    You'll be taught in our vibrant department which has won awards for innovative teaching*, particularly on Taking Race Live, a celebration of race, ethnicity and culture.  Sociology, music and drama students collaborate on this annual event which is held in a local venue and open to the public.

    You will also take part in the annual School of Law, Social and Behavioural Sciences themed week where regular teaching is replaced by a series of workshops, presentations, discussions and reading groups on a contemporary social issue. Previous themes have included race, war and gender, and in 2016, the keynote speaker was Shami Chakrabati, Shadow Attorney General for England and Wales.

    Our Sociology degree is in the top 10 per cent globally in the prestigious QS World University Rankings 2017. Kingston University is the only modern London-based university featured in the sociology rankings.

    * Kingston University 2015 Student-Led Learning and Teaching Awards for Most Innovative Teaching. The initiative is also recognised by the Higher Education Academy's Strategic Enhancement Programme.

National Student Survey 2017

The National Student Survey

The latest National Student Survey (NSS) results for 2016/17 showed that overall 100% of Sociology BSc(Hons) students at Kingston University are satisfied with the quality of the course. This builds on previous year's results and reflects our commitment to engaging with students and responding to their needs.

Watch this video to find out what our students have to say about studying this course at Kingston University:

What you will study

Sociology is all about people and society. It is concerned with how we influence one another as individuals and groups, and the ways in which wider social factors affect what we do and how we think. Sociology challenges our prejudices and assumptions.

The sociology degree explores questions about the nature of society, human relationships and behaviour. It looks at issues around power and inequality, social change, conflict and development.

Foundation year - Social Sciences

You can also study this course with a Foundation year. Find out more >

Module listing

Take a look at some of the content and modules that you may have the opportunity to study on our Sociology course:

Year 1

  • Violence, Transgression and Society explores who is policed and disciplined in societal, popular and political cultures. It thinks about why some people and their behavior are seen as especially violent and transgressive while others are not. It shows that responses to violent and transgressive people are shaped by historical and social context, geographical location and intersections of social identity, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sex, class, faith and age.

    Students will learn about who is policed and disciplined, how, why and by whom across teaching blocks 1 and 2. In teaching block 1 there is emphasis on histories of violence, and in teaching block 2 there is emphasis on contemporary forms of transgression. Examples include: riots and anti-social behaviour, social ‘groups' like homeless people and ‘problem' families, and communities such as white working class and Muslim communities.

    Throughout the module, the question of who is policed and disciplined, how and why, is explored through national and global real-world events and case-studies and in relation to criminal, social and racial justice. Students bring academic knowledge to real-world events and issues in weekly interactive workshops and the module assessment.

    Read full module description

     
  • This module introduces students to some of the most influential ways of thinking about self and identity, drawing on both sociology and psychology. It deals with key dimensions of identity in contemporary life such as gender; work; sexuality; race; ethnicity; understandings of mental health; connections with places such as nations, cities and the globalised world; spirituality and religion. It explores the inseparable interweaving of society and the psyche; the psychological and the socio-political; collective forces and universal human drives. It places the ongoing process of constructing the self in the foreground in attempts to understand people's behaviour and development more generally. The very notion of the ‘self' is treated as an interactive, social phenomenon. The first part of the module considers the questions such as ‘what is the self?' and ‘how does the self arise?' The second part goes on to focus on a number of social dimensions which pattern selfhood. Students' employability is enhanced through the development of presentation skills as well as the ongoing development of analytical and critical skills through discussion and written work.

    Read full module description

     
  • Contemporary Issues in Sociology has two key objectives. The first is to provide the theoretical grounding necessary to becoming a sociologist. It introduces students to some of sociology's key thinkers and tracks the historical development of sociological theory from ‘classical' to 'contemporary'. It presents a critical account of theory and by the end of the module students will have a repertoire of theory available to them. The second objective is to make theory ‘useful' by offering the professional tools necessary to apply it to a range of fresh, contemporary social issues.

    Students are expected to demonstrate their full engagement with the module by keeping a regular, up to date personal research diary. This diary will be used to produce research notes relevant to everyday experiences and students will be expected to reflect on these experiences within the context of the theoretical discussions in the lectures. Students will be expected to discuss their diary entries in seminars.

    The module teaches theory and its application and provides an appropriate theoretical and skills grounding for Levels 5 and 6.

    Read full module description

     
  • A key task of sociologists is to understand the routine aspects of everyday life.

    This module will focus your attention on how researchers have utilised a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods to develop attentiveness to the seemingly mundane that is everyday life and how lives are lived at the junctures of self, family, culture and social worlds. This module aims to ground your understandings of everyday life through practical application of methods and data analysis. You will gain hands-on experience of research skills throughout the module that can be applied to future study and employability

    Read full module description

     

Year 2

  • This module focuses on historical and theoretical conceptualisations and methodological approaches to researching ‘race' and ethnicity in contemporary society. Key questions that are interrogated on the module are: In what ways do the researcher and participants' racial and ethnic identities impact on the research process? In what ways are race and ethnicity shaped, and in turn shape, the experiences of class, gender, sexuality and religion? How do they intersect with other forms of social difference to affect relations of power and privilege? What are the ethical dilemmas of doing such research? How are different social contexts shaped by, and shape, race and ethnicity? What are the ways in which individuals, groups and communities challenge racism in order to raise awareness and contribute to social change? Throughout the module students will work to expand their critical thinking and research skills, make meaningful connections between theoretical concepts and lived experience, and to better understand how experiences of race and ethnicity interact with broader social structures.

    Read full module description

     
  • Building on SO4001 ‘Contemporary Issues in Sociology' and SO4003 ‘Social Selves', this module will develop the concept of ‘the sociological imagination', first outlined by the US theorist C. Wright Mills to indicate "the vivid awareness of the relationship between personal experience and the wider society" (1959). Although Mills was writing in the post-war era, the concept can be traced back to the development of the discipline as it emerged in response to the challenges of social life in industrial cities of the 19th century. Hence this module will use a range of classic and contemporary thinkers to address the double role that sociology has inherited from its origins: not just to understand the world, but to try to change it. This problem will be explored within the context of the city as a strategic unit of analysis in order to understand wider processes of modernisation, industrialisation and the subsequent onset of postmodernity and post-industrialism.

    By studying original texts and placing them within their social and historical contexts, students will deepen their understanding of the discipline's critical engagement with different aspects of social life. There will be a strong focus on London with opportunities for fieldwork.

    The module will be team-taught and will address the underlying questions: what role can sociologists play in tackling different forms of social injustice and inequality?   

    Read full module description

     

Year 3

  • This module explores the social intersections between gender, race and class. It begins by examining historical conceptualisations of these terms and intersections, and the social and civil movements that challenged how these terms were considered in both women's and men's lives.

    From the beginning, the module will introduce you to a wide range of feminist approaches in order to make sense of various intersections of gender, race and class. In this module you will consider how such categories and intersections contribute to identity constructions and contestations. You will reflect on these elements within contemporary examples of everyday life – for example, consumption, families and intimacies, education and sport. Upon completion of this module you will have expanded your skills in critical reflection and analysis of social intersections and inequalities.

    Read full module description

     
  • This module provides students with an opportunity to develop their own sociological specialism by conducting an extended and in-depth study on a topic of their choosing. Students will be tutored in the skills necessary to successfully complete a final year dissertation and will work with a staff supervisor to develop a critical understanding of their research topic. These skills, involving an ability to organise and plan work effectively and autonomously will enhance their employability.

    Read full module description

     
  • This module provides you with an opportunity to develop your own criminological/sociological specialism by conducting an extended and in-depth study on a topic of your choosing. You will be tutored in the skills necessary to successfully complete a final year dissertation and will work with a staff supervisor to develop a critical understanding of their research topic. You will also work together to organise a student conference at which you will present their work, thereby learning the skills of event organisation and management as well as have an opportunity to disseminate your dissertation to a wide audience. These skills, involving an ability to organise and plan work effectively and autonomously will enhance your employability.

    Read full module description

     

Optional year

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University on a not-for-credit basis as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

Most of our undergraduate courses support studying or working abroad through the University's Study Abroad or Erasmus programme.

Find out more about where you can study abroad:

If you are considering studying abroad, read what our students say about their experiences.

Key information set

The scrolling banner(s) below display some key factual data about this course (including different course combinations or delivery modes of this course where relevant).

We aim to ensure that all courses and modules advertised are delivered. However in some cases courses and modules may not be offered. For more information about why, and when you can expect to be notified, read our Changes to Academic Provision.

A copy of the regulations governing this course is available here

Details of term dates for this course can be found here

Contact our admissions team

Submit an enquiry

020 3308 9929*

*Calls cost 7p per minute from a UK landline plus your phone company's access charge. Calls to this number from mobiles are normally deductible from your inclusive minutes.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps

Contact our admissions team

Submit an enquiry

020 3308 9929*

*Calls cost 7p per minute from a UK landline plus your phone company's access charge. Calls to this number from mobiles are normally deductible from your inclusive minutes.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps
Favourite this course

Did you find what you are looking for?

This field is required.

>

Thank you for your feedback.

Find a course

Course finder

>

Find us on Facebook

Undergraduate study
Site menu