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'Expert opinion' news articles - Page 4

Your search returned 233 news stories:

Kingston University psychology academic calls for review into mental health treatments following award-winning research into schizophrenia

Posted Thursday 16 November 2017

Kingston University psychology academic calls for review into mental health treatments following award-winning research into schizophrenia

An award-winning Kingston University psychology expert is urging mental health practitioners and pharmaceutical manufacturers to look at developing specific treatments for individuals with schizophrenia, after her study into the illness was recognised by a leading global psychiatry organisation.

Dr Nora S Vyas, from Kingston University's Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, scooped the Young Investigator Award at the 13th World Congress of Biological Psychiatry in Copenhagen, Denmark, for her research into how un-medicated adults with schizophrenia perform on tasks which tested their memory and sorting skills. The work, carried out in collaboration with Professor Monte Buchsbaum from the University of California in San Diego, concluded that those without treatment were still able to perform well in a range of tasks. It has been published in the Schizophrenia Research journal....


New figures cement Kingston University's role as sector champion in nationwide bid to close BME attainment gap

Posted Wednesday 15 November 2017

New figures cement Kingston University's role as sector champion in nationwide bid to close BME attainment gap

Newly released figures have highlighted how far Kingston University has come since first taking up a national challenge to help more black and minority ethnic (BME) students secure first and upper-second class degrees. The figures show that the University's focus on institution-wide change has led to a fairer chance for all students to achieve their full academic potential.

It had long been recognised that far fewer BME students across the country attained these top two degree classifications compared to their white counterparts, even when their entry qualifications and degree subjects were identical, Kingston University's Director of Student Achievement Nona McDuff explained. "This discrepancy, known nationally as the BME attainment gap, has not until recently received the attention it deserves across the sector," she added. "Too often, the assumption has been that this disparity relates to the backgrounds or characteristics of students while at Kingston the approach has been on the whole institution and our relationship with each student. We believe we are unique among large universities in making the reduction of the attainment gap a cross-university priority starting right at the top with the board of governors." While the grades for the University's white student population have broadly remained in line with rest of the country, the proportion of Kingston's BME students obtaining first and upper-second class degrees has increased from 45 per cent in 2012 to 70 per cent in 2017. Kingston University is committed to helping all its students achieve their full academic potential.This success was down to finding imaginative ways to create a more inclusive environment for all students through an all-out effort right across the University, Ms McDuff said. "We have been directing our energies at knocking down barriers and improving achievement for all students, regardless of their background," she added....


Kingston University study reveals how food poisoning bacteria Campylobacter uses other organisms as Trojan horse to infect new hosts

Posted Monday 13 November 2017

Kingston University study reveals how food poisoning bacteria Campylobacter uses other organisms as Trojan horse to infect new hosts

Kingston University researchers have shown how a leading cause of bacterial food poisoning can multiply and spread – by using another organism's cells as a Trojan horse.

Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common causes of gastroenteritis in the United States and Europe, often infecting humans through raw or undercooked poultry. The new study revealed how the bacteria can infiltrate micro-organisms called amoebae, multiplying within their cells while protected inside its host from harsh environmental conditions....


Kingston University's UN law expert returns to Jamaica to advise government in cracking down on terror related activities

Posted Tuesday 24 October 2017

Kingston University's UN law expert returns to Jamaica to advise government in cracking down on terror related activities

The Jamaican Government has yet again sought the expertise of a Kingston University Law School academic to advise ministers on implementing measures to prevent the financing of terrorism. Dr Gauri Sinha's trip follows her initial visit to the Caribbean island in 2016, where she first helped shape the nation's legislation on anti-money laundering, in accordance with the laws set out in the United Nations Security Resolutions (UNSCR).

Following the success of her first trip, the law lecturer and financial crime expert spent three days forensically scrutinising Jamaica's current laws before producing 17 official recommendations for ministry officials to examine....


New research by Kingston Business School expert debunks myths around best way to manage emails at work

Posted Monday 2 October 2017

New research by Kingston Business School expert debunks myths around best way to manage emails at work

Do you believe emailing gets in the way of more important tasks at work – or that checking your inbox only a few times a day is the most efficient approach? New research by a Kingston University email expert is challenging some of the commonly-held beliefs around the best way to manage – and use – emails in the workplace.

Dr Emma Russell, Head of the Well-being at Work Research Group at Kingston Business School, conducted an extensive review of the literature regarding strategies people use to manage their work email. Emerging themes were then sense-checked in interviews with a group of working adults to find out how these approaches work in practice....


Kingston University expert helps develop app that uses artificial intelligence to create 3D selfies from photographs

Posted Tuesday 26 September 2017

Kingston University expert helps develop app that uses artificial intelligence to create 3D selfies from photographs

A new artificial intelligence system that can create 3D selfies of people's faces from a single photograph has been developed by experts from Kingston University and the University of Nottingham.

Dr Vasileios Argyriou, from Kingston University's Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing, was part of a team of researchers that trained a computer system to recognise features in a flat image and reconstruct them into an accurate three dimensional model....


Newly launched Kingston School of Art will play key role in developing creative leaders who dare to think differently, interim Dean Anne Boddington says

Posted Friday 8 September 2017

Newly launched Kingston School of Art will play key role in developing creative leaders who dare to think differently, interim Dean Anne Boddington says

Kingston University's newly launched art school has opened its doors to students, staff and researchers. Kingston School of Art has returned to its original name to reclaim its 150 years of art school heritage as it looks to influence future discussions as one of the country's leading providers of art and design education.

New interim dean Professor Anne Boddington highlighted the art school ethos at the heart of the renamed Faculty as one of the main drivers in developing graduates able to influence the challenges facing today's society. "It's important to put Kingston School of Art on the map – not only at national and international level, as an institution contributing to the impact of art in the world, but also in terms of the role of an art school in a university," Professor Boddington said....


New Kingston Business School-led research finds email practices of diligent workers make them unhappy and less effective

Posted Wednesday 6 September 2017

New Kingston Business School-led research finds email practices of diligent workers make them unhappy and less effective

When your latest email pops up on your smartphone or computer screen, how do you react?

Head of Kingston Business School's Well-being at Work Research Group Dr Emma Russell, alongside researchers from the University of Surrey, has been looking at how certain personality traits influence the way people manage their email in the workplace....


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