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Foundation Year Humanities and Arts

Attendance UCAS code Year of entry
1 year full time UCAS codes are included on the relevant webpage for the course you would like to study 2018
2019

Why choose this course?

Are you thinking of returning to education after a break? Do you want to have another go at getting some qualifications? Are you contemplating a different degree, and want to get a flavour for it before committing to three years?

This course will provide you with the essential skills needed to study for an undergraduate degree. We're here to help you reach your potential; at the end of the foundation degree, you'll be well equipped and qualified to study a range of humanties and arts disciplines, either as single subjects or in combination.

You'll be part of the dynamic School of Arts, Culture and Communication, which will allow you to explore a range of subjects, including literature, language, creative writing, journalism, media, philosophy, history and performing arts.

As well as gaining subject-specific knowledge, you can attend events with award-winning published authors, participate in Centre for Modern and European Philosophy debates, and hear readings from our Writers' Centre Kingston members.

If you want to be part of a creative, vibrant, and cutting edge humanties programme, then this course is for you.

What you will study

You will study four year-long creative arts and humanities modules during the degree (see module listing below).

Once you've enrolled, you can substitute either Radical Imaginations or Being Human: History and the History of Ideas for the Modern Languages module, provided this does not remove the disciplinary content specific to your named programme.

In addition to these credit modules, you can learn a language for free as part of the innovative Kingston Language Scheme.

Module listing

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Foundation year

  • Introducing ways in which written texts are reimagined, adapted and transformed by creative artists, including writers, theatre makers, choreographers and film directors, this module explores in both theory and practice the relationship between page and stage, word and image, and in doing so enables you to explore creative imagination at its most radical and relevant.

    How and why do television dramas such as Sherlock and Elementary create dramatic interventions into established narratives? How has innovative, controversial and experimental work made by contemporary playwrights such as Caryl Churchill, debbie tucker green and Sarah Kane drawn on classic texts to challenge and alter our perceptions of the world? What does The Bloody Chamber, Angela Carter's creative appropriation of various fairy tales, reveal about this genre and by extension what does Neil Jordan's The Company of Wolves tell us both about Carter's stories and the tales that informed them?

    Questions such as these, addressed in a series of interrelated case studies, will enable you to examine the practices and negotiations involved in work of transition and appropriation. You will develop skills in textual analysis required for writing effective argumentative essays that engage with diverse literary and cultural materials. In addition the module will harness and develop your creative skills: through a series of workshops you work on short creative writing and group performance projects that respond to the texts and contexts introduced on the module.

    Read full module description

     
  • Throughout time, people have drawn on history and on ideas to explore, question and record the experience of being human.

    This module provides an introduction to the study of that experience, in all its variety. It considers how people, events and ideas, past and present, shape our thinking about society, politics, race, gender, art, culture - and life. It enables students to learn how knowledge and awareness of the past is formed and shaped; how it changes and yet in some ways also remains the same. Students debate and reflect critically on the nature of historical knowledge and how 'history' may differ from 'the past', and they consider the ways in which contemporary cultures and societies are shaped by histories of ideas.

    The module draws on a rich store of experience, knowledge and expertise relating to history, philosophy and the history of ideas. It asks students to consider how history relates to memory and how history is used, and mis-used. History is personal and also communal. It is national, international and global. How are all those histories linked? How did people in the past experience things in terms of equality and inequality, in terms of gender, sexuality and race? Why and how was that experience documented, if at all? What can we learn from it?

    Artists, writers, historians, philosophers, musicians, filmmakers and journalists: all have responded to those and other questions. For this module we introduce students to a range of texts and other representations, using history and the history of ideas to explore and debate what it means to be human. 

    Read full module description

     
  • This module introduces you to spoken and written communication and will explore a range of texts on a variety of subjects, for varying audiences and purposes including: media discourses and planned and spontaneous texts using written, spoken and electronic formats. You will learn ways of classifying these modes and how to describe significant features of texts using linguistic frameworks. You will demonstrate your new knowledge in an assessed presentation.

    You will also explore the importance of the audience, aka the reader or listener, for effective communication in different contexts Through considering and critically analysing the structure, style and content of articles published on websites, in newspapers and magazines you will begin to develop an understanding of how journalism is directed at specific readerships.

    You will also learn the practical conventions, contexts and functions of written journalism. You will study how to: originate ideas, undertake journalistic research, interview, organise your material, write well and adhere to house style.

    By examining and practising skills needed to develop and write pieces you will aim to produce a journalistic feature that is suitable for publication. Development of practical skills such as asking the right questions, note-taking, identifying quotes, finding information and assessing the reliability of sources will be measured in an accompanying research log.

    This module also includes a personal tutorial hour, which provides an additional forum for you to discuss work undertaken across all of your modules, and to undertake additional personal development and study skills activities.

    Read full module description

     
  • Modern Languages is for students without any previous knowledge of the language they have chosen to study and will equip you with GCSE-level understanding of that language. As well as studying the language (listening, speaking, reading, writing, grammar and vocabulary), you'll also learn about culture and build your confidence in use of the language in a range of situations. This module follows the blended approach: it will be delivered face-to-face in interactive classes and also online.

     

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University on a not-for-credit basis as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

Most of our undergraduate courses support studying or working abroad through the University's Study Abroad or Erasmus programme.

Find out more about where you can study abroad:

If you are considering studying abroad, read what our students say about their experiences.

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Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps

Contact us

Admissions team

*5p per minute from a BT landline. Call charges from other providers may vary.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps
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