Journalism PgDip/MA

Why choose this course?

Accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) for over a decade, this Journalism PgDip/MA course will equip you for a career in journalism by offering the industry's most sought-after qualification alongside your PgDip or master's degree. It combines professional training and academic study with the skills you will need to succeed in this intensely competitive industry.

As well as being the only London university to offer an NCTJ diploma alongside a news journalism MA, Kingston University was ranked 1st in London for Journalism and Publishing in the Guardian University Guide 2020.

In the last reaccreditation report from the NCTJ, it was noted that "this course... plays a valuable role in producing industry-ready early career journalists".

All of the modules are taught by practising journalists with a range of experience and contacts. As well as teaching you practical skills, the course will engage you in discussion and debate about the state and future of the industry, and the legal, political and ethical context in which journalists operate. Alongside your core modules, you can choose from a range of specialisms, including Sports Journalism, Data Journalism, Feature-writing and Broadcast Journalism, where you will cover everything from making TV and radio packages to voice training.

Mode Duration Start date
Full time 1 year September 2021
Full time 2 years including professional placement September 2021
Part time 2 years September 2021
Location Penrhyn Road

2020/21 entry

If you are planning to join this course in the academic year 2020/21 (i.e. between August 2020 and July 2021), please view the information about changes to courses for 2020/21 due to Covid-19.

 

Continuing students

Students who are continuing their studies with Kingston University in 2020/21 should refer to their Course Handbook for information about specific changes that have been, or may be, made to their course or modules being delivered in 2020/21. Course Handbooks are located within the Canvas Course page.

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • We are the only NCTJ-accredited MA in London, enabling you to sit the NCTJ diploma exams alongside your MA. The diploma is a passport to a wide range of jobs, and includes a shorthand qualification highly prized by employers.
  • This is a fast-paced, exciting and very practical course: while you will also be taught theory and context, it is above all a professional preparation master's degree, getting you ready for the workplace. You will be reporting, writing, filming, interviewing, editing and publishing your journalism right from the start, enabling you to build the wide range of skills needed to thrive in the industry today. Many of our students are in good journalism jobs before even finishing the course. In 2019, 100% of our graduating cohort were in jobs within six months of graduating.
  • You will undertake work experience in professional newsrooms, and go on field trips to real-life settings like the House of Commons, the House of Lords, the BBC, Sky, Crown Court and County Council. In 2019, we took a group of students to Lille to learn about being foreign correspondents.

Accreditation

National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ)

National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ)

National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ)

Kingston's links with the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) open many doors for our students, including opportunities to attend networking events. Eligible students on our course have the option of applying for the NCTJ-run Journalism Diversity Fund, which provides bursaries for living and study costs to a wide range of students.

'Tutors clearly go the extra mile with pastoral care, and supporting students with particular needs.'
NCTJ accreditation report

What you will study

You will develop a range of professional, practical skills and knowledge that will equip you for a job in journalism, including news and feature writing, public affairs, online journalism, media law and shorthand. You will have the opportunity to report and write for our news website, the Kingston Courier, which is run by our postgraduate students. Using your acquired design skills, you'll learn to produce a print supplement to our university newspaper, The River.

Once you have achieved the PgDip, which runs over two semesters from September to May, you can continue on to the MA degree by researching and writing a dissertation or carrying out an equivalent work-based practical project. This will develop your critical thinking and analytical skills, and give you the chance to carry out independent academic research.

The core modules are worth 30 credits each. You'll be expected to complete 180 credits altogether.

Modules: Full-time study

Modules: Part-time study

Optional placement year

You can choose to study for either a PgDip or MA award. If you opt for the MA, you will have the opportunity to do a work-based final project, or a dissertation which allows you to focus on an area of interest and gain valuable research skills, as a potential gateway to a PhD.

Core modules

Hands-on Journalism

30 credits

This module - which includes a two-week work placement outside the university - aims to give students the practical skills needed to work as a journalist. You'll get a chance to practise your core skills of researching, writing, interviewing and editing, running a live news website, the Kingston Courier as a team. You'll learn how to design newspaper pages, and will also learn a wide range of multimedia skills, including video, audio and live broadcast using online and social media platforms. During the course of the module, you will build a wide-ranging portfolio to showcase all of the skills learned on the MA.

As well as counting towards your MA, this module leads to the NCTJ's Essential Journalism exam.

Journalism in Context: Law, Ethics and the Industry

30 credits

This year-long module aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of the legal and regulatory structure within which journalists operate. In recent decades, the industry has changed significantly as it adapts to the opportunities and challenges of the internet age. You will be invited to examine and debate the direction and future of journalism, thinking about everything from legal restrictions on reporting to fake news to the public's perception of journalists.

As well as counting towards your MA, this module leads to the NCTJ's Essential Law and Ethics exams.

Journalism and Power

30 credits

This module will explore the origins, purpose and present-day structure/composition of local and central government in Britain and its devolved nations – and the news media's role as a ‘fourth estate' with a public duty to hold the political establishment and its institutions/agencies to account and expose abuses of power and privilege.

At its core will be an examination of the UK's constitutional framework; its global position in relation to pan-national organisations like the European Union, Nato, United Nations and G8/G20; and the shifting balance of power (and responsibility) between state and individual in Britain today.

The module encompasses the syllabus leading to the NCTJ's Essential Public Affairs exam.

Non credit-bearing modules taken as part of the NCTJ diploma

Court Reporting

0 credits

This module will give you an understanding of how the UK court system works, and get you ready to report from a variety of courts and hearings, including magistrates and crown courts, county courts and inquests. You'll get a chance to visit Kingston Crown Court - just across the road from campus - and practise your legal, shorthand and reporting skills. The module, which is not-for-credit, is taken by all students studying for the MA Journalism, and may also be of interest to MA Magazine Journalism students. It culminates in the NCTJ Court Reporting exam.

Shorthand (Postgraduate)

0 credits

All students on the MA Journalism course study Teeline shorthand, and the module is also available to those studying MA Magazine Journalism. Shorthand is an extremely useful skill for journalists, and one prized by employers: it generates trust with interviewees and increases the speed and efficiency of reporting. You will be taught Teeline, which uses written outlines derived from consonants, by a teacher of longstanding experience; the aim is to reach a speed of 100 words per minute (wpm) by the end of the course.

Shorthand exams at 60, 80 and 100 wpm, count towards the NCTJ diploma.

MA students also choose either the Journalism Dissertation or the Practical Project

Practical Journalism Project

60 credits

Students who wish to go straight into the workplace can opt to do a Practical Journalism Project module while they work, in lieu of a dissertation. This module includes a piece of academic research as well as a portfolio of journalism produced as a working journalist. You will also be asked to reflect on your practice, considering how you can learn from your experience and develop as a journalist. This module takes place between May and September, after core teaching has finished.

MA Journalism Dissertation

60 credits

Students wishing to undertake a substantial piece of academic work can opt to take the dissertation module, which is carried out between May and September, after core teaching has finished. Once you have narrowed down your area of interest, you will be given a supervisor who will work individually with you to help you develop your ideas, frame a hypothesis and conduct appropriate primary and secondary research. The MA dissertation is a good bridge for any students wishing to pursue further study, at PhD level or beyond.

Optional modules

Feature Writing

30 credits

Whatever the type of magazine - from quality Sunday paper supplements to women's lifestyle monthlies - features dominate content. This module encourages students to look critically at feature writing in all its forms and to analyse exactly what makes a great feature. You will learn how to generate winning ideas, research those ideas thoroughly, and turn that research into eye-catching copy. You will also learn how to pitch ideas to publications, and be encouraged to pitch for real during the course.

Specialist Journalism: Sport

30 credits

This module offers an introduction to and broad experience of sports journalism. It will help you develop your writing and reporting skills to produce professional sports copy, including match reports, interviews, sports news stories, profiles and comment. You will also explore the context and pressures under which sports journalism is produced in the modern media. During project work in the second half of the module, you will produce a publishable sports package.

Broadcast Journalism

30 credits

This module aims to teach students the principles and practice of broadcast journalism. You will learn to use a variety of industry-standard software and hardware, and acquire the technical skills necessary to produce quality radio and television packages. You'll learn about broadcast regulation, find out how to pitch stories to potential employers, and develop your presentation skills, receiving voice coaching and taking part in radio and television news days. Alongside traditional methods of broadcast, you will consider what opportunities the internet offers for both storytelling and live reporting.

As well as counting towards your MA, this module leads to the NCTJ's Broadcast Journalism exams.

Specialist Journalism: Digital detectives: Data journalism

30 credits

In this module, you will build practical skills in searching for and developing original investigative stories from online datasets as well as learning how to make use of basic digital tools to visualise your findings in dynamic graphic formats. An understanding of the role and context of data journalism in the light of developments in online ‘data dumping' by ‘hacktivists' is paramount. You will consider accompanying changes to the role of the professional journalist as the traditional ‘gatekeeper' to news and information.

These are exciting times to be involved in data journalism and the module will equip you with the skills necessary for the newsroom and beyond.

We offer a part-time study option to help you fit the course around other commitments.

Year 1: Part-time students take two modules in the first year

Hands-on Journalism

30 credits

This module - which includes a two-week work placement outside the university - aims to give students the practical skills needed to work as a journalist. You'll get a chance to practise your core skills of researching, writing, interviewing and editing, running a live news website, the Kingston Courier as a team. You'll learn how to design newspaper pages, and will also learn a wide range of multimedia skills, including video, audio and live broadcast using online and social media platforms. During the course of the module, you will build a wide-ranging portfolio to showcase all of the skills learned on the MA.

As well as counting towards your MA, this module leads to the NCTJ's Essential Journalism exam.

Journalism in Context: Law, Ethics and the Industry

30 credits

This year-long module aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of the legal and regulatory structure within which journalists operate. In recent decades, the industry has changed significantly as it adapts to the opportunities and challenges of the internet age. You will be invited to examine and debate the direction and future of journalism, thinking about everything from legal restrictions on reporting to fake news to the public's perception of journalists.

As well as counting towards your MA, this module leads to the NCTJ's Essential Law and Ethics exams.

Year 2: Part-time students take one module in the second year

Journalism and Power

30 credits

This module will explore the origins, purpose and present-day structure/composition of local and central government in Britain and its devolved nations – and the news media's role as a ‘fourth estate' with a public duty to hold the political establishment and its institutions/agencies to account and expose abuses of power and privilege.

At its core will be an examination of the UK's constitutional framework; its global position in relation to pan-national organisations like the European Union, Nato, United Nations and G8/G20; and the shifting balance of power (and responsibility) between state and individual in Britain today.

The module encompasses the syllabus leading to the NCTJ's Essential Public Affairs exam.

Year 2: Part-time students also choose either the Journalism Dissertation or the Practical Project

Practical Journalism Project

60 credits

Students who wish to go straight into the workplace can opt to do a Practical Journalism Project module while they work, in lieu of a dissertation. This module includes a piece of academic research as well as a portfolio of journalism produced as a working journalist. You will also be asked to reflect on your practice, considering how you can learn from your experience and develop as a journalist. This module takes place between May and September, after core teaching has finished.

MA Journalism Dissertation

60 credits

Students wishing to undertake a substantial piece of academic work can opt to take the dissertation module, which is carried out between May and September, after core teaching has finished. Once you have narrowed down your area of interest, you will be given a supervisor who will work individually with you to help you develop your ideas, frame a hypothesis and conduct appropriate primary and secondary research. The MA dissertation is a good bridge for any students wishing to pursue further study, at PhD level or beyond.

Year 2: Plus one optional part-time module

Feature Writing

30 credits

Whatever the type of magazine - from quality Sunday paper supplements to women's lifestyle monthlies - features dominate content. This module encourages students to look critically at feature writing in all its forms and to analyse exactly what makes a great feature. You will learn how to generate winning ideas, research those ideas thoroughly, and turn that research into eye-catching copy. You will also learn how to pitch ideas to publications, and be encouraged to pitch for real during the course.

Specialist Journalism: Sport

30 credits

This module offers an introduction to and broad experience of sports journalism. It will help you develop your writing and reporting skills to produce professional sports copy, including match reports, interviews, sports news stories, profiles and comment. You will also explore the context and pressures under which sports journalism is produced in the modern media. During project work in the second half of the module, you will produce a publishable sports package.

Broadcast Journalism

30 credits

This module aims to teach students the principles and practice of broadcast journalism. You will learn to use a variety of industry-standard software and hardware, and acquire the technical skills necessary to produce quality radio and television packages. You'll learn about broadcast regulation, find out how to pitch stories to potential employers, and develop your presentation skills, receiving voice coaching and taking part in radio and television news days. Alongside traditional methods of broadcast, you will consider what opportunities the internet offers for both storytelling and live reporting.

As well as counting towards your MA, this module leads to the NCTJ's Broadcast Journalism exams.

Specialist Journalism: Digital detectives: Data journalism

30 credits

In this module, you will build practical skills in searching for and developing original investigative stories from online datasets as well as learning how to make use of basic digital tools to visualise your findings in dynamic graphic formats. An understanding of the role and context of data journalism in the light of developments in online ‘data dumping' by ‘hacktivists' is paramount. You will consider accompanying changes to the role of the professional journalist as the traditional ‘gatekeeper' to news and information.

These are exciting times to be involved in data journalism and the module will equip you with the skills necessary for the newsroom and beyond.

Part-time students can opt to do shorthand in either their first or second year

Shorthand (Postgraduate)

0 credits

All students on the MA Journalism course study Teeline shorthand, and the module is also available to those studying MA Magazine Journalism. Shorthand is an extremely useful skill for journalists, and one prized by employers: it generates trust with interviewees and increases the speed and efficiency of reporting. You will be taught Teeline, which uses written outlines derived from consonants, by a teacher of longstanding experience; the aim is to reach a speed of 100 words per minute (wpm) by the end of the course.

Shorthand exams at 60, 80 and 100 wpm, count towards the NCTJ diploma.

Many postgraduate courses at Kingston University allow students to do a 12-month work placement as part of their course. The responsibility for finding the work placement is with the student; we cannot guarantee the work placement, just the opportunity to undertake it. As the work placement is an assessed part of the course, it is covered by a student's Tier 4 visa.

Find out more about the postgraduate work placement scheme.

Module

Professional Placement

120 credits

The Professional Placement module is a core module for those students following a masters programme that incorporates professional placement learning, following completion of 120 credits. It provides you with the opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills to an appropriate working environment, and to develop and enhance key employability skills and subject-specific professional skills in your chosen subject. You may wish to use the placement experience as a platform for your subsequent major project module, and would be expected to use it to help inform your decisions about future careers.

The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. The regulations governing this course are available on our website. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this may not be offered.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching methods include workshops, lectures, student-led seminars and guided research.

Assessment methods are often based on the production of news stories, features and essays. You will also be appraised on your performance on the postgraduate publications which you work on during the course. The NCTJ diploma is assessed by exams.

You will also benefit from weekly guest lectures – in the past year guests have included senior journalists and editors at The Guardian, Glamour, The Sunday Times, VICE, Vogue, New Statesman and CNN.

Guided independent study

When not attending timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically involves reading and analysing articles, regulations, policy documents and key texts, documenting individual projects, preparing coursework assignments and completing your PEDRs, etc.

Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the University's online virtual learning platform.

Support for postgraduate students

At Kingston University, we know that postgraduate students have particular needs and therefore we have a range of support available to help you during your time here.

Your workload

Year 1: 13% of your time is spent in timetabled teaching and learning activity.

  • Scheduled teaching and learning: 360 hours
  • Guided independent study: 2,014 hours

Contact hours may vary depending on your modules, and whether you choose a dissertation or practical project, which are both included in the breakdown.

Type of teaching and learning

Type of teaching and learning
  • Scheduled teaching and learning: 360 hours
  • Guided independent study: 2014 hours

How you will be assessed

The PgDip/MA is assessed through coursework, which includes essays, portfolios of journalism, presentations, and, for MA students, a dissertation or work-based research project. Your contribution to the student-run Kingston Courier website will also be evaluated.

The approximate percentage for how you will be assessed on this course is as follows, though depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose:

Type of assessment

Type of assessment
  • Coursework: 100 hours

The NCTJ diploma is assessed through exams, and some portfolio work.

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Class sizes

To give you an indication of class sizes, this course normally enrols around 20 students and lecture sizes are normally 10-20. However this can vary by module and academic year.

Entry requirements

Typical offer

We normally expect candidates to have:

  • a good honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent in an essay-writing subject, demonstrating high standards of literacy;
  • and/or evidence of substantial and demonstrable professional commitment to journalism.

Additional requirements

Interviews

We normally invite applicants for an interview with the course director or another senior member of the teaching team. International students based overseas can arrange for an interview by email or telephone.

Prior learning - AP(E)L

Applicants with prior qualifications and learning may be exempt from appropriate parts of a course in accordance with the University's policy for the assessment of prior learning and prior experiential learning. Contact the faculty office for further information.

International

All non-UK applicants must meet our English language requirements. For this course it is Academic IELTS of 6.5 overall, with 7.5 in Writing and at least 5.5 in each remaining element. Please make sure you read our full guidance about English language requirements, which includes details of other qualifications we'll consider.

Applicants from one of the recognised majority English speaking countries (MESCs) do not need to meet these requirements.

This is clearly a programme that prepares students for work in the real world of journalism. It is run by lecturers who have worked in the industry and understand how to prepare student for the workplace.

Comment from external examiner, 2019

The Journalism Master's degree at Kingston continues to offer students an excellent postgraduate education. It combines intellectual rigour with practical work.

Comment from external examiner, 2017

Who teaches this course?

This course is delivered by one of the top-ranked journalism departments in the country. You'll graduate with excellent employment prospects: students from recent years have entered positions at Grazia, The Financial Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Sun, Channel Four News, The Daily Mail, Closer, OK!, The Daily Express, Dow Jones, Metro, Associated Press, South West News, The Lawyer, Pink News, Gulf News and a range of local newspapers.

You'll be taught by a team of dedicated lecturers who are practising journalists with a wide range of experience and insider knowledge about working in today's industry. Postgraduate students may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

Alongside the academic staff, you'll benefit from high-profile guest speakers, who have previously included Anoosh Chakelian, deputy web editor at the New Statesman; Will Dean, commissioning editor G2 (Guardian); Radhika Sanghani, feature writer, Daily Telegraph; Rachel Rodriguez, social media producer, CNN International.

 

Fees for this course

Home and European Union 2020/21

  • MA full time £10,200
  • PGDip full time £4,660
  • MA part time £5,610
  • PGDip part time £2,563

ELQ (Equivalent Level Qualification) fee 2020/21

  • PGDip full time £6,375
  • PGDip part time £3,506

Overseas (not EU) 2020/21

  • MA full time £16,600
  • PGDip full time £15,150
  • MA part time £9,130
  • PGDip part time £8,332

Fees for the optional placement year

If you choose to take a placement as part of this course, you will be invoiced for the placement fee in Year 2. Find out more about the postgraduate work placement scheme and the costs for the placement year.


Funding and bursaries

Kingston University offers a range of postgraduate scholarships, including:

If you are an international student, find out more about scholarships and bursaries.

We also offer the following discounts for Kingston University alumni:


Bursaries from the NCTJ

The National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) offers bursaries under its Journalism Diversity Fund to students applying for NCTJ-accredited courses who can demonstrate a commitment to journalism and who meet the fund's criteria.

Kingston graduates have been awarded full bursaries from the scheme to continue their postgraduate studies at the University.

Facilities

The journalism department has a dedicated newsroom, fully equipped with dual-booting iMacs, professional newswires from Rex Images and the Press Association, 24-hour news channels and industry standard software such as Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Premiere Pro.

The campus at Penrhyn Road is a hive of activity, housing our fantastic new Town House, with four floors of study space and our extensive library, the main student restaurant, and a host of teaching rooms and lecture theatres.

The Town House offers group study spaces for when you need to work together. The light, airy top floor café serves light snacks and drinks, as well as fabulous views!

At the heart of the campus is the John Galsworthy building, a six-storey complex that brings together lecture theatres, flexible teaching space and information technology suites around a landscaped courtyard.

See a virtual tour of Penrhyn Road campus

Resources in London

Kingston is just a 30 minute train journey away from central London, where you will find the biggest concentration of press and publishing in the UK. This gives you the opportunity to undertake work experience in high-profile media environments.

Student work gallery

After you graduate

In addition to a possible career as a journalist, alternatives may include work in publishing, advertising and marketing, film, television, radio, arts management, new media, business and teaching.

Every year the vast majority of our students go on to successful careers, mostly in journalism and the media, or related industries. In the last few years, our graduates progressed to roles at CNN, the Daily Express, Wandsworth Guardian, Accountancy Age, Barcroft media, Container Management, Metro, Grazia, Richmond and Twickenham Times and Investors Chronicle.

What our students and graduates say

Since finishing my Journalism MA at Kingston, I have managed to find a full-time job and, most importantly, feel confident in my role. The individual modules and courses were well designed to encapsulate the changing face of journalism, from working and producing content for online purposes to writing and designing pages for print. Learning shorthand has also been an invaluable skill. As part of the course, every student will learn the elements of law as it applies to journalists and also learn about local and central government.

The course is set up to prepare you to enter the field of journalism and help will be provided to gain work experience and put you in touch with valuable contacts. Guest speakers visit every week and provide interesting insights into being a hack, both past and present. The tutors were acclaimed journalists and very approachable.

I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Kingston University.

Jody Houton, Reporter, Phuket Post

I started work as a broadcast assistant for BBC Breakfast News in May 2009. I had no broadcast experience before I took the job, so I walked into Television Centre on my first day with no idea what to expect.

I would not have got this job without doing the Kingston MA Journalism course. I referred to the work I did on RiverOnline in every answer during my BBC interview, because it's such a great way to show what you can achieve under pressure and when working as part of a team. The Hands-on module also taught me the importance of checking every detail over and over again, because there's no room for mistakes once you're working.

The Law and Government modules have also helped me, and I use what I learnt on them without even realising it most of the time, particularly when thinking of potential guests to bring on the show and knowing if we can legally cover stories without any risk of repercussions.

Felicity Baker, Live broadcast assistant, BBC Breakfast News

I decided I would pursue a life-long ambition to become a journalist. Keen to study in London, I looked at various universities, but it was the course offered at Kingston that excited me the most. The future of journalism is online. Yet only Kingston placed enough emphasis on the development of web training.

Launching Kingston's University online newspaper RiverOnline undoubtedly gave me a tremendous platform from which to develop as a journalist in the 21st century. It was brilliant for me and it taught me the skills I use day-to-day.

During my course I was fortunate enough to get work experience with several media organisations such as The Daily Telegraph. After finishing two successful spells of work experience there, I was offered a full-time position on the TV desk. I now regularly write about TV, sport, music and film.

Having grasped a good understanding of media law from my seminars at Kingston, I am also confident when subbing some of the Telegraph's more controversial writers. The tutors at Kingston were always zestful in their approach and supportive.

Patrick Smith, Junior content editor, Telegraph Media Group

The journalism MA and NCTJ qualification is a tough but really rewarding course. Unlike my undergraduate degree, I could see exactly how the course was tailored for preparing us for future careers.

What I really liked about Kingston compared to other journalism courses in London is the fact they take on a smaller number of postgraduates, which gives every student more attention as well as creating a tight-knit group. The lecturers got to know us – something that rarely happens at undergraduate level – and did everything to help us succeed.

I am lucky to have worked shifts at a national newspaper thanks to the department's connections – something I would have struggled to do otherwise. This experience and the skills I have learnt this year have secured me a place on the Daily Mail's trainee scheme, which starts in September. In the meantime I am working at the Daily Express.

Selina Sykes, Freelance at the Daily Express and Daily Mail trainee

Studying journalism at Kingston was a really rewarding experience. Although challenging at times, the MA course prompted consideration and debate about a variety of subjects, in addition to the straight teaching of the NCTJ syllabus. I have since learnt that shorthand, whilst tedious at the time, is a vital skill to practice.

Having the opportunity to work on the riveronline.co.uk has been particularly valuable. Setting it up required collaboration as a team, and subsequent development and updates were good practice for the real world. It has been a real talking point in interviews.

The Kingston staff were friendly and supportive and, most importantly, seem passionate about what they teach. Since I've left the course they have also made themselves available when I've needed advice about getting a job or pitching articles. It has really helped that they have been so encouraging.

Katy Taylor, Freelance journalist

Links with business and industry

Guest lectures

The Journalism department hosts weekly guest lectures and other events led by industry experts with a strong focus on developments in the fast-changing world of digital media and journalism. Recent speakers have included:

  • Samira Ahmed – An award-winning journalist with 20 years' experience in print and broadcast
  • Anoosh Chakelian – Deputy web editor at the New Statesman
  • Will Dean – commissioning editor G2 (Guardian)
  • David Jenkins – Editor of Little White Lies, a bi-monthly movie magazine powered by illustration that has just reached its 60th issue
  • Ben Machell – Writer for The Times, columnist for ES Magazine
  • Fatiman Manji – News correspondent and presenter at Channel 4 News
  • Rachel Rodriguez – social media producer, CNN International
  • Radhika Sanghani – feature writer, Daily Telegraph
  • Samira Shackle – Deputy Editor of New Humanist, and freelance journalist specialising in politics, terrorism and gender
  • Alex Stedman – Fashion blogger The Frugality, former style editor at Red magazine
  • Farrah Storr – Editor-in-Chief of Cosmopolitan, former editor of Women's Health
  • Rossalyn Warren – An award-winning foreign affairs journalist, formerly of BuzzFeed News. Her reporting has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, Guardian, VICE, CNN, BBC, ELLE, Newsweek, and Teen Vogue
Links with business and industry
MA Journalism students in Lille

Links with business and industry

Events

We hold events on current affairs such as the recent panel discussion ‘Truth and Terror' examining the relationship between the Islamic State and the media and a live debate on the future of press regulation between Hacked Off and the Press Complaints Commission.

The department also hosts the annual Journalism Oscars to celebrate the brightest and best journalism students, with categories including news reporter, feature writer, digital journalist and postgraduate of the year.

Changes to courses for 2020/21 due to Covid-19

Changes detailed here are for students joining this course in the academic year 2020/21 (i.e. between August 2020 and July 2021).

Course information (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Composition of the course

We do not anticipate making any changes to the composition of the course, i.e. the number of modules or credits in a year for part-time postgraduate courses, as a result of the pandemic.

In order to safeguard our students' health and safety and to minimise the risk of disruption to their studies, the University has postponed all Study Abroad programmes for outgoing students in the first teaching block of 2020/21 (from September 2020 to December 2020). The University will review this decision before the second teaching block and will take into account relevant government advice at that time.

Changes can be made to courses as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to the composition of the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Modules

We do not anticipate making any changes to module titles and summaries or to the availability of modules as a result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to modules as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to module titles and/or availability of modules will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Length of course

We expect to deliver the course within the planned timescales to enable successful students to progress through and graduate from the course without delay.

In exceptional circumstances the sequence of learning and teaching activities may be changed, e.g. re-sequencing those modules that can be delivered more effectively under the current restrictions with those which would be more difficult to deliver, such as practical modules and placements.

Entry requirements (changes for 2020/21 entry)

We have not changed entry requirements as a result of the pandemic. However, the range of accepted alternatives have increased as has the way in which we select students, which now includes virtual interviews and online portfolios.

Entry requirements for international students

We have not changed entry requirements for international students as a result of the pandemic. However, in response to the pandemic, we now accept a much broader list of English language exams for entry to the course; the level of these exams remain the same.

Teaching (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Changes to the way the course will be delivered

Due to the current pandemic the course's teaching and learning activities will be delivered through both online and on-campus methods (blended learning) in 2020/21. In order to provide all students with a comparable on-campus experience, the University has committed to ensuring that all courses provide at least 30% of their teaching and learning activities on-campus.

While physical distancing measures remain in place, you will receive your learning and teaching via a blend of on-campus and on-line activities. Should your circumstances prevent your attendance at on-campus sessions, you will still be able to engage with your course in a way that allows you to progress. Where this is not possible, support will be available to consider what options are open to you.

Changes to teaching in the event of a further lockdown or adjustments in government advice

The University will continue to closely monitor government announcements and advice in relation to the current pandemic and, where required, will take any necessary action in order to comply with such advice.

In the event that a further lockdown is enforced the University will aim to deliver the course fully online. This may require some additional changes being made to planned teaching and learning activities, including assessments. The majority of our courses are prepared to be delivered fully online if the situation requires it. Where the quality of the student experience may be compromised significantly, or the course is unable to be delivered fully online, the University may need to suspend the delivery of that course until a time that it can be delivered appropriately. Students will be supported in these situations to ensure they are able to make the right choices for their particular circumstances.

In the event that the current social distancing restrictions are fully lifted and the University is able to resume normal delivery of teaching and learning activities, courses will assess whether it is in the students' interest to resume normal delivery. In some cases it may be better to continue and complete modules under the planned blended delivery mode.

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for Year 1

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours will not be made as a result of the pandemic. However, it is possible that some adjustments might be made at module level, e.g. a few more scheduled activities, in order to help ensure student engagement with blended learning.

Any changes made to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

'Scheduled teaching' includes teaching that is online either live or recorded / on demand.

Timetable

Your individualised timetable for teaching block 1 (i.e. from September 2020 to December 2020) should be available by the end of August 2020. Timetables for teaching block 2 (i.e. from January 2021) will not be available until the autumn. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 9pm. To accommodate smaller group sizes and social distancing, we will need to maximise the time available for teaching. This means, we may have to use Wednesday afternoons and enrichment week for additional teaching slots. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Class sizes

On campus classes, class sizes will be smaller, in line with social distancing measures. Online (synchronous) activities will be delivered via videoconferencing apps that will enable a full range of class sizes to be used as appropriate.

Assessment (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Changes can be made to modules, including how they are assessed, as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our modules up to date with current developments in that subject area. Due to the current restrictions in place, i.e. social distancing, it is anticipated that many formal on-campus examinations, including practical examinations, will be replaced with alternative assessments which can be completed online. These changes will be considered and approved through the University's processes to ensure that student assessments will be able to demonstrate they have achieved the expected learning outcomes. The approval process will also assess whether the change impacts the status of any professional body accreditation the course benefits from.

Any changes to the overall methods of assessment for the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Staff (changes for 2020/21 entry)

No changes are expected to the general level of experience or status of staff involved in delivering the course.

As a result of the social distancing restrictions in place, on-campus teaching activities may need to be split into smaller groups which may require the support of teaching assistants and student mentors, who will be managed by experienced staff.

Fees, funding and additional costs (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Tuition fees

There will be no changes to published tuition fees for 2020/21.

Additional costs (e.g. field trips, materials, equipment, etc.)

As a result of the blended delivery of courses in 2020/21, where a significant proportion of the teaching will be done online, students will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online teaching and learning activities. Students who are able to travel will have access to computers on campus, however, it should be noted that access to on-campus facilities will be restricted due to social distancing requirements.

The University is considering how best to provide support to students who do not have access to suitable hardware and software requirements and access to the internet. Identifying students who require this type of support is an important milestone for the University in our journey to ensure equity of access while we continue to deliver our blended approach. Information about the support that will be available will be provided to students during the induction period.

Funding

There will be no changes to any existing University funding arrangements for 2020/21. Currently there are no indications from the UK government that there will be any changes to government funding arrangements.

Fees and funding for international students

There will be no changes to published tuition fees or funding arrangements specifically relating to international students for 2020/21.

Work placements and field trips (changes for 2020/21 entry)

The university will need to follow government advice with regards field trips to the BBC, the Houses of Parliament, local council and radio stations. Students will still be encouraged to find work placements, and will access the full range of university support to do so. However, the ten day work placement will no longer be mandatory, recognising that some students may not be in a position to do one.

Placements (including work and clinical placements) and field trips included as part of the course will go ahead as planned. However, to ensure students are able to gain maximum value from these activities, it may be necessary to reschedule them to later in the year when current restrictions have been lifted. We acknowledge that this year it may be more difficult for students to secure appropriate placements. In those situations, students will be guided and supported through the various options that will be available to them, including switching courses or interrupting their studies until a time when they can complete their placement.

Any proposed changes to placements or field trips would go through University's agreed processes where the impact of the change will be carefully considered. Students will be advised of any changes that may become necessary and appropriate support will be available to students to guide them through the various options that may be available to them.

In the interest of the health and wellbeing of our students, the University will ensure that appropriate risk assessments are made before students are sent on a placement.

Courses which require placements or field trips to be completed in order to pass relevant modules will have contingency plans in place in the event that a placement or field trip cannot be completed due to another lockdown or more stringent social distancing measures.

Voluntary placements or field trips may be rescheduled, or, as a last resort, cancelled if it becomes difficult to deliver them and doing so is in the interest of the health and safety of our staff and students.

Award, qualification and accreditation (changes for 2020/21 entry)

Qualification

No changes will be made to the qualification awarded, e.g. MSc, as a result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to courses, including the qualification awarded (although very rare), as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area. Any changes made to the qualification awarded for the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Additional (changes for 2020/21 entry)

International students

International students should maintain awareness of the UK government's and their home country's government advice on possible travel restrictions. The University will closely monitor advice and guidance published by the UK government and assess its impact on our international students. Appropriate advice and guidance will be provided as and when required.

Students who are unable to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities

The University will ensure students who are unable to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities are able to effectively engage with their studies remotely. For certain courses an inability to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities may not be in the students best interest, as it may impede their chances of succeeding in the course or lead to them receiving a poor learning experience. In such cases students will be advised and guided through the various options available to them, such as deferring their studies until they can engage fully with the course.