Research degree funding opportunities

TECHNE - AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership

TECHNE - AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership

TECHNE - AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership

TECHNE comprises nine universities and is one of the 10 Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Doctoral Training Partnerships. TECHNE's vision is to produce scholars who are highly motivated and prepared for academic, public or professional life. Its students will benefit from a diverse and rich range of training workshops and opportunities to engage with partners in the arts and cultural sector.

TECHNE will offer around 57 AHRC scholarships each year across the range of arts and humanities disciplines for students who are applying to undertake PhD study: 45 in its open competition and 12 through the Collaborative Doctoral Award route. The open competition includes those who are applying initially as an MPhil student with the intention to upgrade to PhD study.

TECHNE welcomes both interdisciplinary research proposals and those focussed within traditional discipline areas.

Students may apply to TECHNE for a doctoral award by submitting a TECHNE application through Kingston University. It is not possible to submit an application directly to TECHNE: you must apply through one of the member universities.

 

Links to more information on both schemes can be found below.

TECHNE Open Competition for October 2021 entry

TECHNE Collaborative Doctoral Award studentships for October 2021 entry

AHRC TECHNE Collaborative Doctoral Award studentships in the Arts and Humanities

We are inviting applications for the below PhD projects.

For detailed information, including subject eligibility and contact details for initial enquiries please see the links below.

Making, Unmaking and Remaking History: Exhibition Programming at Chisenhale Gallery in the late 1980s

In partnership with Chisenhale Gallery and Kingston's Contemporary Art Research Centre.

Kingston School of Art and Chisenhale Gallery welcome applications for an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Partnership studentship: Making, Unmaking and Remaking History: Exhibition Programming at Chisenhale Gallery in the late 1980s. This is offered under the TECHNE Doctoral Training Partnership Scheme, to begin in October 2021.

Deadline for Expressions of Interest:

Monday 15 February 2021, 9am (GMT). Interviews: 17–18 February 2021.

Project supervisors:

Dr Dan Kidner and Mr Volker Eichelmann, Kingston School of Art and Architecture in collaboration with Dr Zoé Whitley and Ellen Greig of Chisenhale Gallery.

Project Vision

This CDA will focus on the excavation and re-activation of a small but highly significant number of exhibitions held at the Chisenhale Gallery in the late 1980s including "Essential Black Art", 1988, curated by Rasheed Araeen and Black Umbrella; "Yellow Peril: New World Asians", 1989; and solo presentations of the work of Lubaina Himid and Donald Rodney, also in 1989. These exhibitions, staged during the early years of the artist-founded non-profit exhibition space, proposed challenging and radical takes on identity and politics that continue to be relevant over 30 years later. Their discursive positions variously addressed power structures in the form of curatorial agency, structural racism, and police brutality.

Although historically significant, the gallery's exhibition archives have only been accessed by a small number of curators, artists and researchers - and never made public. Central to this enquiry is the question: how can a series of ground-breaking exhibitions held at Chisenhale Gallery in the 1980s be re-activated and reconsidered in order to productively engage with Britain's evolving cultural contexts in relation to institutional exclusion, when the present moment again arouses provocative debate around notions of Britishness and representation?

This project will be predicated on artistic research as a central tool for recording, transforming and disseminating past artistic endeavours. Here particular emphasis will be given to the development of suitable digital and online platforms for the presentation of the gallery's archives, including photographs, planning documents, correspondence, publicity material and press. The gallery's close contact with the artists and the artist estate of Donald Rodney will ensure the successful candidate has access to extensive original archive material beyond Chisenhale's considerable holdings.

Tackling digital multi-modal forms of contemporary artistic presentations will be central to the development of the PhD. The project will develop an innovative online presence to encourage wide participation and re-activate discourses and events from the late 1980s. From the beginning of the project, interactive electronic content will be produced which will explore ways in which new technologies and media can be used to critically reflect on artworks and discourses from the 1980s centred on race, class and gender. As such the CDA is dedicated to the exploration of new and divergent forms of knowledge whose presentation will seek alternate modes of articulation and will test out a recounting of a particular aspect of Chisenhale's history as polyvocal, fragmented and diverse.

Over the course of the PhD, the successful candidate will use a range of digital tools and platforms to record their encounter with the archival material held at Chisenhale. This form of archival research will be complemented by interviews with relevant protagonists, including artists, curators and gallery staff. Research findings will be made public and shared with stakeholders periodically during the research process, thus generating a live and growing archive.

This CDA will produce a significant body of new work, supported by Chisenhale and Kingston School of Art's Contemporary Art Research Centre (CARC), as part of the doctoral submission, making the research generated available to a wide and diverse audience.The studentship will be based in the Contemporary Art Research Centre at Kingston University. During the research process, the student will divide their time between Chisenhale Gallery and Kingston University, where a full academic training and development programme is provided. Visits to other archives and institutions will also be required from time to time based on the developing research focus.

For informal enquires about the project contact Mr Volker Eichelmann, Associate Professor: v.eichelmann@kingston.ac.uk

Award details

Subject to AHRC eligibility criteria, the studentship covers tuition fees (home rate only) and a grant (stipend) towards living expenses. AHRC studentship rates for 2020-21 are yet to be announced - the doctoral stipend for 2019-20 was £17,285 (three and a half years full-time or part-time equivalent for seven years); levels are likely to rise slightly for 2020-21. Collaborative Doctoral Students also receive an additional stipend of £550. Students can apply for an additional six months stipend to engage in extended development activities such as work placements. See AHRC funding and training for full details.

As a TECHNE student, the selected applicant will have full access to the TECHNE Doctoral Training Partnership development activities and networking opportunities, joining a cohort of almost 60 students per year from across ten universities in the UK.

Student Eligibility

Applicants should ideally have or expect to receive a relevant Masters-level qualification or be able to demonstrate equivalent professional skills. Suitable disciplines are likely to include Fine Art, Art History, Photography, or Film Studies. They will need to demonstrate experience and expertise in working across digital platforms and evidence an ability to engage diverse audiences.

This project will give the candidate the unique opportunity to work in close partnership with one of the UK's key contemporary art institutions and realise a complex and challenging research project with guidance from staff and affiliated artists.

With most of Chisenhale's archive not having yet been accessed and re-activated this project will further allow the doctoral candidate to gain unprecedented insight into the formation and development of this institution, placing them in a unique position to pursue their artistic and academic career.

Applicants must satisfy AHRC eligibility requirements and terms and conditions.

Students who are fee assessed as ‘international' are eligible for the stipend to support living costs and tuition fees at the UK rate. UKRI funding will not cover international fees set by universities.

The proposed studentship (subject to selection by the TECHNE Panel) will fund a full-time PhD studentship for three and a half years or part time study for up to seven years (50% FTE and above).

Application Process

Please send your expression of interest for this project by email to: KSAresearch-applications@kingston.ac.uk

Please title your email ‘CDA' and give the relevant partner institute's name.

Applications should comprise the following:

  • 1-2 page statement outlining your interest in this research project.
  • A copy of your first degree and postgraduate qualifications.
  • A current CV (no more than 2 pages).
  • A sample of your academic work.

Applications must be received by Kingston University no later than Monday 15 February 2021, 9am (GMT)

Interviews for shortlisted candidates will be on 17–18 February 2021.

The selected candidate will then be supported by supervisors and partners to complete a TECHNE application for final submission to TECHNE by Monday 19 March 2021.

Results of this second stage competition will be known by May 2021.

Curating Urban Futures: "Meanwhile" Tactics in the Context of Urban Regeneration Strategies

In partnership with Distrito Castellana Norte and Kingston's department of Architecture.

Kingston School of Art and Distrito Castellana Norte, S.A. ("DCN") welcome applications for an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Partnership studentship: Curating Urban Futures: "Meanwhile" Tactics in the Context of Urban Regeneration Strategies. This is offered under the TECHNE Doctoral Training Partnership Scheme, to begin in October 2021.

Deadline for Expressions of Interest:

Monday 25 January 2021: 5.00pm (GMT)

Interviews week commencing 1 February 2021.

Project supervisors

Dr Jana Scholze, School of Critical Studies and Creative Industries and Dr Christoph Lueder, School of Art and Architecture in collaboration with Gema del Pozo of DCN and Dr Almudena Cano.

Project Vision

Large scale, complex urban regeneration projects brought about by transformation of transport infrastructure are profoundly shaping urban futures of European cities. London's King's Cross project is a prominent example; among other major redevelopment urban projects in Europe, it has served as an inspiration for Madrid Nuevo Norte (MNN). MNN is an ongoing urban regeneration project led by Madrid Town Hall and developed mainly by DCN, our project partner.

Comprising 230 ha of urban land, MNN will proceed in stages over the next 24 years; the project will reinforce and unite neighbourhoods currently isolated by a railway corridor that has become a first-level urban barrier. This PhD investigates how urban multi-phase projects open up interim spaces of challenge, conflict and opportunity where initial demolition and construction works have brought to public attention the scale and direction of the urban transformation process, highlighting issues, problems and prospects. Such interim, or "meanwhile" phases stimulate public discourse and citizen engagement.

The suspended stage of "meanwhile" scenarios, where the future intersects the past and new arrivals mix with long-time local habitants, affords researchers a temporary window of opportunity to study, challenge and test the dynamics and forces that make cities at their very point of making. This CDA will examine frameworks for public participation established in London and Madrid in order to then develop new, trans-disciplinary methods and processes for meaningfully engaging societal stakeholders and local communities. It coalesces around curatorial projects to be implemented and tested in MNN and critically evaluated.

Whilst the student will determine the parameters of their research and formulate their research questions and approaches, the supervisory team and project partner have identified the following research themes as key to developing transferrable and scalable models of participation:

a. Time as strategic dimension in designing public spaces.

b. Combining temporary interventions and tactical urbanism with long-term strategic approaches.

c. Interplay of societal actors and forces over extended intervals of "meanwhile" scenarios.

d. Stimulating engagement and building a sustainable culture of participation.

The trans-disciplinary methodology is anchored in an initial phase of literature review, archival studies, on-site documentation and stakeholder interviews examining urban and neighbourhood planning, in particular institutionalised public participation in London (Localism Act) alongside emergent, experimental curatorial and participatory practices. The student will have access to a range of leading London-based practitioners such as The Decorators, We Made That and Assemble whom KSA has collaborated with.

Working with the project partner and societal stakeholders, the student will then develop ideas for live interventions in Madrid Nuevo Norte. Using a mix of "participatory action research" methodologies, their research will map and evaluate agencies and power relationships manifest in complex urban interactions while simultaneously engaging communities through curatorial projects that may include installations, performances, gatherings, debates, walks, rituals, or workshops. Thus, the researcher becomes an active participant in ongoing urban and societal processes, gaining a complex understanding of urban transformation that enables them to imagine, test and evaluate possible, probable and alternative urban development scenarios.

The studentship will be based in Architecture and Curating at Kingston University. During the research process, the student will divide their time between DCN and Kingston University, where a full academic training and development programme is provided. Visits to other archives and institutions will also be required from time to time based on the developing research focus.

For informal enquires about the project contact Dr Christoph Lueder, Associate Professor: c.lueder@kingston.ac.uk

Award Details

Subject to AHRC eligibility criteria, the studentship covers tuition fees (home rate only) and a grant (stipend) towards living expenses. AHRC studentship rates for 2020-21 are yet to be announced - the doctoral stipend for 2019-20 was £17,285 (three and a half years full-time or part-time equivalent for seven years); levels are likely to rise slightly for 2020-21. Collaborative Doctoral Students also receive an additional stipend of £550. Students can apply for an additional six months stipend to engage in extended development activities such as work placements. See AHRC funding and training for full details.

As a TECHNE student, the selected applicant will have full access to the TECHNE Doctoral Training Partnership development activities and networking opportunities, joining a cohort of almost 60 students per year from across ten universities in the UK.

Student Eligibility

Applicants with either practice and/or theory backgrounds may apply. The proposed PhD student will have a Master's degree in curating, architecture, urban design, art or visual culture, or equivalent experience and skillset. They should have experience working with communities and an interest in combining archival and theoretical methods with participatory action research. Fluency in Spanish, or willingness to develop language proficiency during the first 12 months (supported by Kingston University language scheme provision) is required.

During the project, the student will gain in-depth knowledge of urban development projects in London and Madrid and the strategies and forces that underpin them. They will be introduced to urban research tools and develop a unique new repertoire of "participatory action research" methodologies. They will acquire practical skills and experience in engaging civil society, as well as in disseminating knowledge through public-facing activities such as curating and event programming that will enhance their employability.

Applicants must satisfy AHRC eligibility requirements and terms and conditions. Students who are fee assessed as ‘international' are eligible for the stipend to support living costs and tuition fees at the UK rate. UKRI funding will not cover international fees set by universities.

The proposed studentship (subject to selection by the TECHNE Panel) will fund a full-time PhD studentship for three and a half years or part time study for up to seven years (50% FTE and above).

Application Process

Please send your expression of interest for this project by email to: KSAresearch-applications@kingston.ac.uk. Please title your email ‘CDA' and give the relevant partner institute's name.

Applications should comprise of the following:

  • 1-2 page statement outlining your interest in this research project
  • A copy of your first degree and postgraduate qualifications
  • A current CV (no more than 2 pages)
  • A sample of your academic work

Applications must be received by Kingston University no later than Monday 25 January 2021: 5.00pm (GMT)

Interviews for shortlisted candidates will be in the week beginning the 1 February 2021.

The selected candidate will then be supported by supervisors and partners to complete a TECHNE application for final submission to TECHNE by Monday 19 March 2021.

Results of this second stage competition will be known by May 2021.

Enquiries

Please contact us for more research funding information.