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Journalism BA(Hons)

Attendance UCAS code/apply Year of entry
3 years full time P500 2019
2020
4 years full time including foundation year P501 2019
2020
6 years part time Apply direct to the University 2019
2020

Why choose this course?

The Guardian University Guide 2019 has ranked us first in London and sixth in the UK for Journalism and Publishing.

Progression into work or further study stands at 90 per cent. The National Student Survey 2017 showed that 90 per cent of our students are employed within six months of finishing the course, with 60 per cent working as media professionals. 

In addition, our graduates' first job salaries after six months of finishing the course reach £25,000 - higher than the UK average of £19,000 for journalism graduates.
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Our alumni have progressed to roles such as senior broadcast journalist at the BBC, digital news editor at OK! Magazine, sports journalist at the Daily Star, and picture editor at The Sun. They also work in the business press, broadcasting, PR and media-related roles like fashion copywriter.

What you will study

Year 1 introduces the skills for becoming an effective journalist including digital skills, mobile reporting, video and social media, news and feature writing. You will also study the broader context of journalism in society and the critical issues facing journalists today.

In Year 2, you will be able to develop your skills in a range of specialist modules including broadcast, data journalism and magazine journalism. In the Practical Journalism 2 module you will produce your own live digital and print publications. You will also study core subjects such as video, layout and media law and have the opportunity to pursue a research project. You can also choose to study abroad at one of our partner universities.

Year 3 enables you to put your learning into practice through hands-on experience at The River Newspaper and River Online - a past winner of the Guardian Student Media Award newspaper of the year. You will have the opportunity to undertake work experience and internships in London, the hub of the UK's media industry, supported by our work placement scheme.

You will study key subjects such as ethics and media law to prepare you for the workplace, and specialist modules such as sport, fashion, business or international journalism. You will expand your critical and analytical skills by undertaking a research paper on a specialist module or through a dissertation.

Foundation year - Humanities & Arts

You can also study this course with a Foundation year. Find out more >

Module listing

This programme is designed to equip you with knowledge and expertise both to understand the world of journalism as consumers and to engage with it as practitioners, as well as providing them with transferable skills that are of use in a variety of professions.

These include the capacity to carry out independent research, and to demonstrate initiative and leadership; teambuilding, interview techniques digital skills; and the ability to produce precise, accurate, engaging written work to tight deadlines.

Modules

Each level is made up of four modules each worth 30 credit points. Typically a student must complete 120 credits at each level.

 

Year 1

  • Writing is a key communication tool of journalism. This module introduces you to the language, practical conventions, contexts and functions of written journalism in the multimedia environment. Through studying and critically analysing the structure, style and content of articles published on websites, in newspapers and magazines you will begin to develop an understanding of how copy is gathered, put together and directed at specific readerships.

    Through lectures and through practice in workshops you will learn to identify a story from raw, diffuse or incomplete information by the application of news values, to write it in appropriate style, to add headlines and online "furniture" and to upload it to a content management system.

    Writing clear, accurate and engaging text relies on understanding and applying the rules of grammar, using the right words and constructing coherent prose. This module also helps you to boost your grammar and punctuation skills, choose and use appropriate words and craft effective sentences and paragraphs. You will discover the underlying rules and principles, consider the impact of your writing decisions and develop your own writing and editing skills.

    Also, by examining and practising skills needed to develop and write pieces such as: originating ideas, researching, assessing the reliability of sources, interviewing, organising material and adhering to house style, you will aim to produce journalistic news pieces and feature articles that are suitable for publication.

    Read full module description

     
  • This is a core module for full and half-field Journalism students. It offers a critical introduction to the discipline of journalism in all its forms, with particular emphasis on news. At its heart is a question central to studying journalism: why do journalists approach their trade in the way(s) they do, and what are the values, norms and assumptions underpinning their professional practice? The module commences with an examination of news values - the (often unspoken) 'rules of thumb' that determine the subjects/stories journalists report and the angles they pursue. It adopts a critical approach to examining reporting practice - introducing academic concepts like framing, agenda-setting and active audience theory to consider not only how journalists select and/or construct their narratives but also the increasing contribution of audiences themselves to the shaping of news discourse. 

    The module examines two other issues central to the role of the journalist: objectivity and public interest. Students are encouraged to critique the question of objectivity, with reference to real-world examples that both uphold and challenge this idea, including the practice of openly partisan/campaigning journalism. Public interest is examined in light of recent controversies that have exposed legal and ethical issues with contemporary journalism - including the 'phone-hacking' scandal and ensuing Leveson Inquiry and criminal prosecutions.

    The module also acts as a more general introduction to the academic strand of the BA Journalism degree - introducing students to Kingston's personal tutor system and the conventions of essay-writing, Harvard referencing and exam technique.

    Read full module description

     
  • This two semester-long module introduces students to the background of the ‘online revolution' and its implications for the role of the journalist and the future of the industry. Through lectures and practical workshops students will gain understanding of the impact of the internet including social media on reporting and writing and an introduction to multimedia reporting including video. Assessment for this module takes the form of a portfolio (100%) of multimedia content including video, some of which is researched and created in students' own time.

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  • A key part of a journalist's role is to inform readers what is going on in the world. To do this well, journalists have to understand how the world works and why. This module aims to build on existing understanding to provide students with the necessary political, economic, historical social and cultural context to underpin their development as journalists. Areas for exploration and discussion will include Britain's role in the world; the UK's relationship with Europe, the US and the developing world; British institutions and their role and influence (including the monarchy, parliament, the judiciary, Whitehall, religious bodies, universities, local government, banks and finance houses) and the history and emergence of competing ideologies such as capitalism, socialism and liberalism. The module will explore emerging social and cultural trends and the way these are covered in the media. Underpinning the module will be the key questions of "Where does power lie?" "Who has control?" "Who is responsible?" "Who really runs things?"

    Read full module description

     

Year 2

  • This is a core module taken by both all second year journalism students. It aims to expand, develop and hone the print and online skills acquired in Practical Journalism 1. The module will also explore how journalism is shaped by the legal and regulatory context in which it is practised. Students will focus on story development, writing and editing in print and online, layout and page design, and video story-telling. They will also learn Teeline shorthand, aiming to reach a speed of 60-100 wpm. They will acquire a working knowledge of libel, contempt and privacy law as well as court reporting skills. 

    Read full module description

     

Year 3

  • The module incorporates involvement in the production of the campus newspaper, The River, and its web-based version, River Online as well as undertaking a period of at least two weeks work experience within a media organisation working in a professional environment producing and practising journalism.
    Each student will take on an editorial role on The River as well as contributing news and feature articles. Roles may vary, but will allow students to observe and participate in essential activities which contribute to producing real journalism. Teaching takes place in our dedicated newsroom, equipped with live news feeds, online content management system, and industry-standard software packages including Adobe InDesign and Photoshop.
    The placement will typically be for two weeks, although students who show initiative in negotiating more substantial work experience may be allowed to extend this period.

    Read full module description

     

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University on a not-for-credit basis as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

Most of our undergraduate courses support studying or working abroad through the University's Study Abroad or Erasmus programme.

Find out more about where you can study abroad:

If you are considering studying abroad, read what our students say about their experiences.

Key information set

The scrolling banner(s) below display some key factual data about this course (including different course combinations or delivery modes of this course where relevant).

We aim to ensure that all courses and modules advertised are delivered. However in some cases courses and modules may not be offered. For more information about why, and when you can expect to be notified, read our Changes to Academic Provision.

A copy of the regulations governing this course is available here

Details of term dates for this course can be found here

Contact our admissions team

Submit an enquiry

020 3308 9930*

*Calls cost 7p per minute from a UK landline plus your phone company's access charge. Calls to this number from mobiles are normally deductible from your inclusive minutes.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps

Contact our admissions team

Submit an enquiry

020 3308 9930*

*Calls cost 7p per minute from a UK landline plus your phone company's access charge. Calls to this number from mobiles are normally deductible from your inclusive minutes.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps
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Writers' Centre Kingston

As a student on this course you will be part of the Writers' Centre Kingston, a vibrant community of outstanding writers, journalists and publishers.

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