Psychology with Counselling BSc (Hons)

Why choose this course?

This dynamic degree explores the complexities of the human psyche, arming students with the tools to make a positive impact on emotional wellbeing. You will study key counselling approaches such as person-centred, cognitive-behavioural and psychodynamic therapies.

While developing an understanding of common and complex mental health disorders, you will also develop key counselling competences such as communication and listening skills, empathy, self-awareness, establishing boundaries and working ethically within a therapeutic setting.

Taught by specialised academics and qualified counsellors, you will also develop a core understanding of the fields of cognitive, biological, developmental and social psychology, as well as transferable skills in experimental design and statistical analysis.

A combination of Psychology with Counselling can be recognised as a real asset by employers because these subjects develop knowledge and people skills that are invaluable when working with individuals and teams. Upon graduation you will be eligible to apply for postgraduate training or studies. For example, a Doctorate in Counselling or Clinical Psychology which will lead to Chartered Psychology Status.

Attendance UCAS code Year of entry
3 years full time C890 2024 (Clearing)
2025
4 years full time including foundation year C891 2024 (Clearing)
2025
4 years full time including professional placement C892 2024 (Clearing)
2025
6 years part time Apply direct to the University 2024 (Clearing)
2025

Please note: Teaching on this course may take place on more than one KU campus.

Main Location Penrhyn Road

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS)
  • Upon graduation, you will be in an excellent position to pursue further training and education in careers such becoming a counsellor or therapist.
  • This degree also prepares you to pursue postgraduate training in clinical or counselling psychology or any chartered psychology degree.
  • The option of a one-year paid work placement in the application of psychology will boost your employability further.

Kingston's Department of Psychology

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), which means that you could go on to become a Chartered Psychologist if that is your chosen career path. This is an ongoing accreditation.

Graduates, with a minimum of a 2:2, from this course are eligible to gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) from the BPS.  This is a necessary first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist. You would then take further training in a specific field of psychology that you want to work in. This could then lead to a career as a Chartered Psychologist in your chosen field, for example forensic psychology.

What you will study

Take a look at some of the content and modules that you may have the opportunity to study on this course:

Year 1

Year 2

Optional year

Sandwich year

Year 3

In your first year, you will acquire a broad foundation of knowledge around key theories and ideas of psychological science. You will begin to critically analyse historic perspectives, contemporary issues and ways of thinking about identity. You will be introduced to key strategies which are used in psychological research.

Modules

Psychology Research Methods 1

30 credits

This module is a core requirement for students taking psychology in level 4. The module will introduce you to key strategies which are used in psychological research, including designing an experiment, hypothesis testing, and statistical analysis. The main features of the module will involve the acquisition of practical skills in psychological research, learning how to apply and carry out statistical tests using SPSS, and how to report research findings.

Throughout the module you will learn how to design a research project, analyse data and report a psychological experiment.

Foundations of Psychology

30 credits

This module introduces students to theories and ideas of psychological science in core areas of research. This module allows students to acquire a broad foundation of knowledge of these core areas, as well as many specialist sub-areas of psychology (e.g., biological psychology, learning, sensory and perceptual processes, memory, thought and knowledge, language, social, developmental, neuropsychology, individual differences, clinical).

Historical and Philosophical Concepts in Psychology

30 credits

This module will set modern psychology in its historical and philosophical context. Key scientific ideas and perspectives will be introduced and then applied specifically to psychology. No previous experience of history or philosophy will be assumed.

The content of the module will include historical perspectives of prominent individuals on science and psychology (e.g. Donders, Wundt, Ebbinghaus, James, Freud, and Jung) and also broader philosophical movements (e.g. rationalism, empiricism). Having established such historical issues, contemporary issues in philosophy of psychology will be developed (e.g. reductionism and biological explanation, realism/anti-realism, modularity, free will and determinism, consciousness and the mind-body problem).

Workshops will serve to consolidate the lecture material, providing opportunities for students to apply principles and ideas learned in the lectures to worked examples in psychological theory and practice. A central aim of the module is to allow students to develop their critical analysis skills.

Social Selves

30 credits

This module introduces students to some of the most influential ways of thinking about self and identity, drawing on both sociology and psychology. It deals with key dimensions of identity in contemporary life such as gender; work; sexuality; race; ethnicity; understandings of mental health; connections with places such as nations, cities and the globalised world; spirituality and religion. It explores the inseparable interweaving of society and the psyche; the psychological and the socio-political; collective forces and universal human drives. It places the ongoing process of constructing the self in the foreground in attempts to understand people's behaviour and development more generally. The very notion of the ‘self' is treated as an interactive, social phenomenon. The first part of the module considers the questions such as ‘what is the self?' and ‘how does the self arise?' The second part goes on to focus on a number of social dimensions which pattern selfhood. Students' employability is enhanced through the development of presentation skills as well as the ongoing development of analytical and critical skills through discussion and written work.

In the second year, you will examine the relationship between brain function and our understanding of cognition and behaviour. You will study current theory and practice that focuses on the person in psychology. You will also be introduced to counselling and psychotherapy in practice, developing practical skills and exploring real-life case studies.

Modules

Psychology Research Methods 2

30 credits

This module builds on the introduction to research methods and inferential statistics offered in PS4001 Research Methods 1. It will cover more advanced research designs — involving multiple independent variables — and more advanced inferential statistics such as analysis of variance, regression analysis and factor analysis. It will also introduce students to qualitative research methods and data analysis. Students will learn to develop and implement multifactorial experimental designs through practical research exercises and a project. Students' scientific writing skills will be further developed on the basis of a series of lab reports.

Social and Developmental Psychology

30 credits

The module covers a broad range of key theories and empirical research in social and developmental psychology. You will study current theory and practice in psychology across range of topics that focuses on the person in psychology. We will explore the importance of culture, ethics, the scientific approach and the notion of measurement.

Brain, Behaviour and Cognition

30 credits

This module covers major topics within the field of cognitive psychology and examines the relationship between brain function and our understanding of cognition and behaviour. You will be introduced to key theoretical explanations proposed to account for human cognition, alongside some real-life applications of cognitive psychology. You will study the structure and function of the nervous system before examining the contribution of specialised brain structures to cognitive functions such as perception, attention, language, memory and decision making, and behaviours such as motivation, eating, emotion and sleep. You will also learn about the effect of hormones, drugs and neurological dysfunction on cognition and behaviour.

Introduction to Counselling and Psychotherapy in Practice

30 credits

This module offers a comprehensive insight into counselling and psychotherapy, presenting key concepts, theories and methodologies that constitute the bedrock of therapeutic practice. You will develop the core practical skills necessary for effective counselling (e.g. active listening, empathy and nonverbal communication). You will explore real-life case studies and how theoretical concepts are applied in practical scenarios, fostering an understanding of how diverse approaches can be effectively employed.

This module also underscores the importance of self-awareness and reflective practice for therapists, addresses legal and ethical complexities, and culminates with discussions about ongoing professional development and emerging trends in the ever-evolving field of counselling and psychotherapy.

Study abroad optional year

You have the option to take an additional year to study abroad or to undertake a year-long work placement overseas (or even a mix of both).

This course has a sandwich year option which takes place between Year 2 and your Final Year. During this sandwich year you will take a placement within a relevant setting, ensuring you gain essential experience to add to your CV and help you secure a graduate job.

In your final year, you will research a chosen topic for your dissertation. You will explore the relationship between mental health issues and the practice of counselling and psychotherapy across the lifespan. Through practical sessions, you will focus on your personal development and aspirations, while expanding your knowledge of therapeutic techniques used in counselling and psychotherapy.

Core modules

Psychology Research Project

30 credits

This module will provide the opportunity to study and employ different methodologies in psychology by evaluating the strengths and limitations of different research designs. Students will execute an empirical research project on a topic agreed in consultation with a Psychology staff supervisor. Supervisory sessions with an academic supervisor will guide students to conduct a literature review, formulate a research question, design a research study, and consider research ethics relating to their study, culminating in data collection and writing up of a research report which satisfies APA guidelines.

Mental Health in Counselling and Psychotherapy

30 credits

This module explores the intricate relationship between mental health issues and the practice of counselling and psychotherapy across the lifespan. Students will learn about various facets of mental health disorders, encompassing their assessment, treatment, and the strategic therapeutic techniques employed to aid individuals confronting psychological challenges. Therapeutic methods are introduced, with specific focus on the person-centred approach and integrative counselling. Tailored counselling strategies for distinct disorders are outlined through illuminating case studies. Students will also discover current trends and research in the field, enabling them to keep up-to-date with the latest advancements and apply holistic and empathetic care within the domain of counselling and psychotherapy.

Personal Development and Therapeutic Process

30 credits

This practical module examines students' personal growth and therapeutic techniques in counselling and psychotherapy. The module underscores the importance of a counsellor's self-awareness, self-care, continuous learning and emotional well-being in nurturing successful therapeutic outcomes using a client/user-centred approach. Through practical sessions and group-based work, students will explore the role of personal values, biases, and triggers in shaping counsellor-client interactions and relationships. Ethical frameworks and professional guidelines are at the centre of all practical work, with emphasis on the necessity of maintaining confidentiality and practising within one's competencies. Cultural competence is also spotlighted, urging students to navigate diverse clients with cultural sensitivity and inclusiveness.

Optional modules (choose one)

Advanced Developmental Psychology

30 credits

This is an optional module for Level 6 students who wish to expand their knowledge about child development. The module will cover a broad range of issues in developmental psychology including both examples of typical and atypical development, such as reading development and dyslexia, children's relationships and bullying, language in typical and atypical populations, sensory impairment, children's understanding of number and dyscalculia, children with Williams Syndrome, among other themes. The module will involve a combination of keynote lectures, interactive lectures and guided independent study during which current theories, methodologies and research will be discussed and critically evaluated. In addition, transferable skills will be fostered through student led interactive discussions and tasks.

The Psychology of Health and Wellbeing

30 credits

The module will engage students with the main themes of contemporary health psychology and positive psychology with a particular focus on theory, research, intervention, and application. The students will gain an understanding of the importance of psychological processes in the experience of health and illness, and explore the role of behaviour and emotion in current trends of mortality and morbidity. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the role of positive emotions, optimism, spirituality, flourishing relationships, and community engagement in promoting health, well-being, and happiness. They will also become aware of the crucial roles health psychology and positive psychology have to play in the development and evaluation of physical and psychological health promotion interventions.

Introduction to Forensic Psychology

30 credits

This module will give a broad overview of the intersection between psychology and the criminal justice system. Forensic psychology is concerned with the psychological aspects of the legal process including police investigation and court procedures. Students will learn to apply psychological theory to criminal investigation, understand the psychological problems and developmental processes associated with criminal behaviour and victimisation. There will be an introduction to the assessment and treatment of those who have committed offences. The module will also give an insight into the training and career pathways for forensic psychologists.

Neuropsychology and Neuro-rehabilitation

30 credits

There are two main streams in this module: Part I - Neuropsychology. The module will place a particular emphasis on understanding the effects of brain activity on cognitive and social aspects of human behaviour (and vice-versa). In addition, the module will address the effects of brain injury and neurological impairments with a view to understand models of normal cognitive and social functioning. Video material will be used to illustrate clinical cases when available. Part II – Neuro-rehabilitation. The module will introduce students to modern techniques for the diagnosis of neurological disorders and their neuropsychiatric implications. Interventions for the treatment and management of neurological disorders will be evaluated. Students' effort and engagement will be essential for a successful and rewarding experience. This will include active participation in lectures and the reading of the indicated material.

Critical Social Psychology: Memory, Narrative and Representation

30 credits

This module explores the nature and origins of social knowledge and critically evaluates the basis for claims to 'absolute reality'.

The module will be of interest to students who wish to examine contemporary beliefs and assumptions about the world on a range of political, philosophical, psychological and moral issues. In the second semester, earlier theoretical knowledge is applied to the study of collective memory (the memory of people across generations) – a foundational form of social knowledge involved in the construction of identity. The study of social/collective memory raises some political issues. For example, in the aftermath of conflict, competing versions of the past are often a barrier to reconciliation. Understanding the nature and content of collective memory therefore becomes important.

Students should have an interest in the history and politics of conflict, including human rights, although detailed historical knowledge is not a pre-requisite. Course material comprises film and television documentary, which will broaden and deepen existing knowledge of 20th century events.

Please note

Optional modules only run if there is enough demand. If we have an insufficient number of students interested in an optional module, that module will not be offered for this course.

Foundation year - Social Sciences

If you would like to study this degree at Kingston University but are not yet ready to join the first year of a BSc (Hons) course, you may want to consider studying this course with a foundation year.

Future Skills

Knowledge to give you the edge

Embedded within every course curriculum and throughout the whole Kingston experience, Future Skills will play a role in shaping you to become a future-proof graduate, providing you with the skills most valued by employers such as problem-solving, digital competency, and adaptability.

As you progress through your degree, you'll learn to navigate, explore and apply these graduate skills, learning to demonstrate and articulate to employers how future skills give you the edge.

At Kingston University, we're not just keeping up with change, we're creating it.

A female engineering student, in the engineering lab.

Kingston School of Law, Social and Behavioural Sciences

The School offers courses in economics, sociology, law, psychology and criminology. Our degrees are underpinned by a vibrant research culture and delivered by a blend of practitioners and academics who are dedicated to equipping you with the employability skills to thrive in your career.

You will have a wealth of opportunities outside the classroom to further your learning and gain hands-on experience in your chosen field.

Life on the course

Psychology conference

Check out the video from the department's annual Psychology conference

Themed week: an inter-play of subjects

Students experience the interdisciplinary nature of their subject

After you graduate

Mental health problems are a significant and growing issue, with an estimated one in four people experiencing mental health problems at some point in their lives.

The importance of counselling to the wellbeing of individuals and society is increasingly recognised. This has led to an increased demand for mental health services, and a corresponding increase in the number of job opportunities available for graduates in this field.

Graduates may work in the charity and care sector, advocacy and victim support services, National Health Service or as mental health support workers.

In addition, graduates are well placed to pursue postgraduate education such as the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology or Counselling psychology to become a Chartered Psychologist. Further training and education can lead to Chartered Psychology status in other areas (e.g. Health, Forensic, Educational), or becoming a counsellor, a psychological wellbeing practitioner, a teacher or an HR Professional.

Specialist careers support

You will take part in an Assessment Centre Experience, providing the opportunity to experience the pathway to employment with tailored feedback to help develop your employability skills for the world of graduate employment.

  • Develop your understanding of the jobs market, including current trends and opportunities, different recruitment processes and how to identify relevant roles
  • Receive personalised feedback reports to help you to improve and progress
  • Access additional webinars on top tips, employer expectations and best practice
Specialist careers support

Entry requirements

If you would like to join us through Clearing 2024, please call our Clearing line on 0800 0483 334 (or +44 020 8328 1149 if you are calling from outside the UK) and speak to our friendly and knowledgeable hotliners who will be able to provide information on available courses and will guide you through your options.

Please note the entry requirements listed below are for 2025 entry only.

Typical offer 2025

  • 120-136 UCAS tariff points (to include at least two A-levels or equivalent qualifications); Degree with foundation year 64.
  • BTEC Lvl3 National: Distinction, Distinction, Merit (DDM).
  • GCSE Mathematics at grade C/4 or above or a recognised equivalent.

Typical offer 2024

  • 120-136 UCAS tariff points (to include at least two A-levels or equivalent qualifications); Degree with foundation year 64.
  • BTEC Lvl3 National: Distinction, Distinction, Merit (DDM).
  • Candidates are normally required to hold five GCSE subjects at grade C/4 or above, including Mathematics and English Language.

Additional requirements

  • Entry on to this course does not require an interview, entrance test, audition or portfolio

International

  • We welcome applications from International Applicants. Please view our standard entry requirements from your country
  • All non-UK applicants must meet our English Language requirements. For this course it is Academic IELTS of 6.0 overall, with no element below 5.5

Country-specific information

You will find more information on country specific entry requirements in the International section of our website.

Find your country:

Typical offer and UCAS points explained

Like most universities, we use the UCAS Tariff point system for our course entry requirements.

Find out more about UCAS Tariff points and see how A-level, AS level, BTEC Diploma and T-level qualifications translate to the points system.

Teaching and assessment

Scheduled learning and teaching on this course includes timetabled activities including lectures, seminars and small group tutorials.

Guided independent study (self-managed time)

Outside the scheduled learning and teaching hours, you will learn independently through self-study which will involve reading articles and books, working on projects, undertaking research, preparing for and completing your work for assessments. Some independent study work may need to be completed on-campus, as you may need to access campus-based facilities such as studios and labs.

Academic support

Our academic support team here at Kingston University provides help in a range of areas.

Dedicated personal tutor

When you arrive, we'll introduce you to your personal tutor. This is the member of academic staff who will provide academic guidance, support you throughout your time at Kingston and show you how to make the best use of all the help and resources that we offer at Kingston University. 

Your workload

A course is made up of modules, and each module is worth a number of credits. You must pass a given number of credits in order to achieve the award you registered on, for example 360 credits for a typical undergraduate course or 180 credits for a typical postgraduate course. The number of credits you need for your award is detailed in the programme specification which you can access from the link at the bottom of this page.

One credit equates to 10 hours of study. Therefore 120 credits across a year (typical for an undergraduate course) would equate to 1,200 notional hours. These hours are split into scheduled and guided. On this course, the percentage of that time that will be scheduled learning and teaching activities is shown below for each year of study. The remainder is made up of guided independent study.

  • Year 1: 23.66% scheduled learning and teaching
  • Year 2: 22.5% scheduled learning and teaching
  • Year 3: 19.66% scheduled learning and teaching

The exact balance between scheduled learning and teaching and guided independent study will be informed by the modules you take.

Your course will primarily be delivered in person. It may include delivery of some activities online, either in real time or recorded.

How you will be assessed

Types of assessment

  • Year 1: Coursework 43%; exam 57%
  • Year 2: Coursework 47%; practical 10%; exam 43%
  • Year 3: Coursework 92%; practical 8%

Please note: the above breakdowns are a guide calculated on core modules only. If your course includes optional modules, this breakdown may change to reflect the modules chosen.

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback to you on your assessments within 20 working days.

Your timetable

Your individualised timetable is normally available to students within 48 hours of enrolment. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student friendly as possible, scheduled learning and teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 6pm. For undergraduate students, Wednesday afternoons are normally reserved for sports and cultural activities, but there may be occasions when this is not possible. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Who teaches this course?

You will be taught by an experienced teaching team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on this course. The team includes senior academics and professional practitioners with industry experience. Postgraduate research students may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.  

The following group of staff members are currently involved in the delivery of different elements of this course. This pool is subject to change at any time within the academic year. 

Course fees and funding

2025/26 fees for this course

The tuition fee you pay depends on whether you are assessed as a 'Home' (UK), 'Islands' or 'International' student. In 2025/26 the fees for this course are:

 Fee category Amount
Home (UK students)

£9,250*
Foundation Year £5,760

International

Year 1 (2025/26): £18,500 
Year 2 (2026/27): £19,200
Year 3 (2027/28): £19,900
Year 4 (2028/29): £20,700

For courses with a sandwich year, the fee for the placement year can be viewed on the undergraduate fees table. The placement fee published is for the relevant academic year stated in the table. This fee is subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body.

* For full time programmes of a duration of more than one academic year, the published fee is an annual fee, payable each year, for the duration of the programme. Your annual tuition fees cover your first attempt at all of the modules necessary to complete that academic year. A re-study of any modules will incur additional charges calculated by the number of credits. Home tuition fees may be subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body. Full time taught International fees are subject to an annual increase and are published in advance for the full duration of the programme.

Eligible UK students can apply to the Government for a tuition loan, which is paid direct to the University. This has a low interest-rate which is charged from the time the first part of the loan is paid to the University until you have repaid it.

2024/25 fees for this course

The tuition fee you pay depends on whether you are assessed as a 'Home' (UK), 'Islands' or 'International' student. In 2024/25 the fees for this course are:

 Fee category Amount
Home (UK students) £9,250*
Foundation Year: £9,250
International

Year 1 (2024/25): £17,800
Year 2 (2025/26): £18,500
Year 3 (2026/27): £19,200
Year 4 (2027/28): £20,100

For courses with a sandwich year, the fee for the placement year can be viewed on the undergraduate fees table. The placement fee published is for the relevant academic year stated in the table. This fee is subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body.

* For full-time programmes of a duration of more than one academic year, the published fee is an annual fee, payable each year, for the duration of the programme. Your annual tuition fees cover your first attempt at all of the modules necessary to complete that academic year. A re-study of any modules will incur additional charges calculated by the number of credits. Home tuition fees may be subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body. Full-time taught International fees are subject to an annual increase and are published in advance for the full duration of the programme.

Eligible UK students can apply to the Government for a tuition loan, which is paid direct to the University. This has a low interest-rate which is charged from the time the first part of the loan is paid to the University until you have repaid it.

Note for EU students: UK withdrawal from the European Union

The Government has recently announced that new students from the European Union and Swiss Nationals starting their course after August 2021 will no longer be eligible for a student loan in England for Undergraduate or Postgraduate studies from the 2021/22 academic year. This decision only applies to new EU students starting after 2021/22. If you are an existing/continuing EU student, you will continue to be funded until you graduate or withdraw from your course.

Need to know more?

Our undergraduate fees and funding section provides information and advice on money matters.

Additional costs

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs that are not covered by tuition fees which students will need to consider when planning their studies. Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, access to shared IT equipment and other support services. Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

Where a course has additional expenses, we make every effort to highlight them. These may include optional field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering), security checks such as DBS, uniforms, specialist clothing or professional memberships.

Textbooks

Most of your readings will be available through the library at no extra cost to you. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. You may prefer to buy your own copy of key textbooks – these can cost between £50 and £250 per year.

Computer equipment

There are open-access networked computers available across the University, plus laptops available to loan. You may find it useful to have your own PC, laptop or tablet which you can use around campus and in halls of residences. Free WiFi is available on each of the campuses. You may wish to purchase your own computer, which can cost from £100 to £3,000 depending on your course requirements.

Photocopying and printing

In the majority of cases written coursework can be submitted online. There may be instances when you will be required to submit work in a printed format. Printing, binding and photocopying costs are not included in your tuition fees, this may cost up to £100 per year.

Field trips

Some modules have optional field trips but these vary year to year. 

There may be other optional trips which would incur a travel cost of approximately £15. Optional trips will usually be organised to free-entry events or locations. If there is an entry free it will be approximately £15.

Travel

Travel costs are not included in your tuition fees but we do have a free intersite bus service which links the campuses, Surbiton train station, Kingston-upon-Thames train station, Norbiton train station and halls of residence.

Placement

If students choose the optional second year module Applied Psychology: Theory and Practice, they will spend time working in an organisation or with an individual family. Students usually choose a placement that is local to them. Travel costs will vary, but if a student's placement required a peak time zone 1-6 student Travelcard for one day per week for 10 weeks, the total travel cost would be around £200.

If the placement year option is chosen, during this year travel costs will vary according to the location of the placement, and could be from £0 to £2000.

Course changes and regulations

The information on this page reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. To improve your student experience and the quality of your degree, we may review and change the material information of this course. Course changes explained.

Programme Specifications for the course are published ahead of each academic year.

Regulations governing this course can be found on our website.