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Research projects

Below is a selection of research projects currently underway at RESCALE, in alphabetical order.

Drawing practices and architectural representation
Jane Houghton 2015 Tufa and brick wall. Mono print, Ink on Somerset paper

Drawing practices and architectural representation

We understand hand drawing and making as practices of design and tools of enquiry into architecture and landscape. The physical relationship between thought, the hand, paper surfaces, material volumes and voids, is powerfully evocative and productive. Researchers within RESCALE explore and interrogate representation disciplines and craft processes across two and three-dimensional media, including charcoal, graphite, embossing, as well as plaster, concrete and bronze casting. Amongst such regimes of making and knowing, printmaking plays a special role as a process embodying and making manifest resonances amongst craft practices, design and thinking processes.

Over several years, Jane Houghton has worked with postgraduate architecture and landscape students to develop annual exhibitions considering drawing practices through the printmaking process.

International Urbanism - Atlas of Negotiated Typologies

Irregular settlements and urban villages figure in a differentiated range of scenarios of rapid urbanisation in the Global South. RESCALE has undertaken field research in collaboration with the German Jordanian University Amman on Jabal Al Natheef, a Palestinian refugee camp in Amman, Jordan, with Chulalongkorn University Bangkok on Ban Krua, an urban village in Bangkok, Thailand and with the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago and the Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso on Cerro de la Cruz, an irregular settlement in Valparaiso.

Christoph Lueder and Pat Brown hosted a roundtable on Urbanisation in Latin America at Kingston University in 2016, followed by "Representing Irregular Urbanism" at the ICA in 2017, hosted by Christoph Lueder and Almudena Cano.

International Urbanism - Atlas of Negotiated Typologies
Jabal Al Natheef, Palestinian Refugee Camp, Amman, Jordan

Landscape Interface Studio research

The multi-layered project develops and extends our water, places and people research at scales from big picture landscape urbanism practice to the micro topographies and ecologies of local practice. This includes themes of navigation, flood resilience, and experience of the city and takes advantage of our immediate location on the Arcadian Thames London.

Through projects including EU Waterways Forward, Pat Brown has developed an extended collaborative network supporting inclusive communication, participatory workshops, and EU policy recommendation outputs.

Live projects research
Fujimori Tea House, Barbican. Image credit: Ben Tynegate

Live projects research

Both research informed teaching and teaching informed research are at the core of what RESCALE does, as manifested in the collaborative student/staff live projects of the past 6 years.

Most recently, Takeshi Hayatsu and MArch Unit 6 built a Japanese teahouse and garden designed by Terunobu Fujimori at the Barbican in London.

Practice based research

The majority of RESCALE members are engaged in practice based research. Our department's ethos is grounded in a concern with continuity in architectural culture, and in making work which is sensitive to situation and context. This culture relies on the work of practitioners who are somewhat resistant to working in full sympathy with the commercial realities of their age, who make space for this more thoughtful work.

Practice based research
Preservation, Policy and Community Engagement

Preservation, Policy and Community Engagement

The research relates to the change and reinterpretation of existing environments through research, policy, proposal and community engagement. It engages listed buildings but also changes in the public realm that challenge existing behaviours and priorities within existing physical and cultural contexts.

In 2017, Justine Langford's community-based research informed the Ham and Petersham Neighbourhood Plan.

Register

Register is a series of lectures, podcasts, and other means to disseminate the work and conversations that take place in Kingston. We are aware that new knowledge in architecture frequently depends on people working at the margins of things, showing resistance, and making space for their practice to evolve and flourish.  In the coming years we will be building our already rich internal discourse about these practices and processes at Kingston.

The podcast is on iTunes, ACast and RSS feed. Andrew Clancy speaks with practitioners, planners, developers and others who visit our school about their motivations and methodologies.

Register

Research in environmental design

Research in environmental design focuses on the resilience of our built environment, and responds to an increasing need to develop strategies for adapting to climate change and carbon emissions. The research in this field is led from the school's architectural science and technology laboratory, ArchiLab. Current research takes a holistic approach to sustainable design, construction and occupation of buildings and a number of projects are currently in operation. Details of research carried out in ArchiLab, the researchers involved, and past and current projects can be found on the ArchiLab website.

Space, Place and Architecture through Lens-Based Art

Space, Place and Architecture through Lens-Based Art

Space, Place and Architecture through Lens-Based Art

A multi-faceted project exploring the relevance of artist's film and photography for grasping the elusive spatio-temporal continuum of architectural experience, and the ambiguities of our late modern built environment. The project has so far resulted in a number of journal articles, book chapters, film screenings and exhibitions.

Eleanor Suess screened her films Venice Wall and East Croydon Ramp at Cinecity 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. In 2017 Alexandra Stara has published a book chapter on "City and river in contemporary landscape photography."

Image: Strange Places (installation view) 2009. photo: Ellie Laycock

Research, Cities, Architecture, Landscape, Environment

Kingston School of Art
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