Pharmacy MPharm (Hons)

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) Gold award

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) Gold award

Our commitment to high quality teaching has been recognised with a TEF Gold rating. The University has received an overall rating of Gold, as well as securing a Gold award in the framework's two new student experience and student outcomes categories.

Why choose this course?

Are you interested in health issues and the treatment and prevention of disease? Have you considered a career as a pharmacist?

This course examines the science behind the preparation, supply and monitoring of medicines. You'll study law, ethics and clinical practice, the role of hospitals, community, GP practice, care home and industrial pharmacists.

Working alongside other future healthcare professionals, you'll talk to patients about their conditions and treatment. Through case studies, you'll learn how chemistry, pharmacology and pharmaceutics affect clinical practice. In Year 4, you'll complete a research-based project, for which you'll receive specialist tuition.

This course is currently being updated in line with the General Pharmaceutical Council's standards for initial education and training for pharmacists, which will enable pharmacy graduates to prescribe at the point of registration.

Please also visit our Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences (Pre-Pharmacy) FdSc course page.

Attendance UCAS code Year of entry
4 years full time B230 2024
5 years full time including foundation year B231 2024

For 2024 entry, please submit your application before the UCAS deadline as this course may not be in a position to consider applications submitted after this date.

Location Penrhyn Road

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • This degree is fully accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council.
  • Our pharmacy department's new GP simulation suite and simulated hospital ward, with life-like manikins, will provide you with the most up-to-date teaching to equip you for your future role as a prescribing pharmacist.
  • This course is run jointly by Kingston University and St George's, University of London so you'll have access to specialist facilities and staff expertise.

What you will study

Foundation year

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

If you would like to study MPharm, but are not yet ready to join the first year of the course, you can include an extra foundation year to prepare you for the MPharm course. Please note, to progress to Year 1 of the MPharmacy programme, you must achieve a minimum average of 70% across the core modules, and pass a progression interview.

Core modules

Professional and Scientific Skills for Pharmacy

30 credits

This is a core module for the pharmacy route of the Foundation year in Science, Computing & Mathematics.  The module provides a bridge between the wide range of study experiences of students at Level 3 and the demands of successful study within Higher Education at level 4. 

The module allows students to develop effective study skills, in the context of pharmacy and the essential scientific and professional skills necessary to allow students to progress to their chosen degree subject.  The module provides a coherent path through a set of practical and theoretical experiences to develop skills and knowledge and is designed to complement and support the subject content of the other modules within the foundation year programme.

A wide range of assessment methods are used in the module.  These include a portfolio of skills and laboratory-based assessments, a written exam and a short capstone project culminating in a poster presentation which will use the skills developed in this module, alongside the subject material in other route specific modules, to consider a topical issue related to the student's chosen degree pathway.  The personal tutorial system for the foundation year is incorporated within this module.

Biology

30 credits

This module is delivered as part of the Foundation Pharmacy one year programme. The module is core for students on the course as well as for alternative destinations such as degrees in a number of Life Science, Forensic, Chemical and Pharmaceutical related degrees. The module is designed to provide an essential introduction to the biological sciences, through the study of basic biochemistry, the characteristics of life, selected body systems, genetics and evolution. It also introduces some of the relevant tools and techniques used in modern biology.

Chemistry

30 credits

This module is delivered as part of the Foundation Pharmacy one year programme. The module is core for all students on this programme as well as for alternative destination such as degrees in a number of Life Science, Forensic, Chemical and Pharmaceutical related degrees. It is also an optional module for those who intend to study degrees in Geography, Geology and the Environmental Science.

The module covers a wide range of fundamental chemical concepts including: atomic and nuclear structure, bonding and structure, energetics, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and organic chemistry including, isomerism and introduction & reactions of alkanes, haloalkanes, alkenes, alcohols, amines, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid derivatives. The module allows students to see the application of Chemistry to a number of Science-based disciplines.

Mathematics for Science

30 credits

This module is a core module for all students following the Foundation Pharmacy one year programme. The module is designed to allow students to develop competence in a range of mathematical and statistical techniques which they can then apply within a range of scientific contexts. The module reinforces basic mathematical concepts and is accessible to students with a wide range of previous mathematical experiences. The structure and programme of delivery is specifically designed to support the other modules within the programme so ensuring that students have developed the necessary skills at the correct time for their application within the other modules.

Year 1 introduces the scientific basis of pharmacy, including cell biology, physiology and pharmaceutical and biological chemistry (including the importance of natural products as medicines). You will study important pharmaceutical dosage forms, formulation and manufacturing processes, physico-chemical aspects of drug stability and pharmacopoeial and regulatory requirements. You will gain a clear understanding of the profession of pharmacy and the practical and theoretical aspects of dispensing.

Core modules

Fundamentals of cell and human physiology

30 credits

This module gives an overview of the fundamentals of cell and human physiology. Emphasis is placed on understanding the basic structure and functions of cells, organelles and biomolecules and how these interact with each other to form tissues, organs and organ systems.

You will be introduced to the structure and functions of organ systems in health and selected disease states; the control of homeostasis and the rationale for the use of laboratory investigations and diagnostic tests to diagnose and monitor selected diseases. You will also gain an insight into the pharmacological and non-pharmacological basis of treatment and management of selected cases of altered health to promote healthy living in a patient-centred manner.

Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Drug Delivery

30 credits

This module introduces key concepts of medicines' physico-chemical properties and formulation, spanning from synthesis and reactivity of active ingredients to stability and manufacture of commercial products. It provides you with an understanding of essential concepts and physico-chemical principles and techniques in the design and production of various pharmaceutical dosage forms with links to the route of delivery into the body and fundamental concepts relevant to the clinical microbiology of disease-causing organisms and vaccines.

The module examines structure, bonding, stereochemistry, and chemical reactivity of organic molecules of pharmaceutical relevance. The importance of the physical and chemical properties of molecules in determining the activity of a drug is discussed, including an introduction to structure/activity relationships, in terms of anti-inflammatory agents, antimalarials, antivirals, and antibiotics. You will be introduced to spectroscopy as well as in vitro aspects of stability, pharmaceutical analysis, and molecular manipulation.

Pharmacy Law, Ethics and Practice

30 credits

This module reflects the key professional regulations, law and obligations required to become a pharmacist, as dictated by the governing professional body and government legislation. You will be introduced to legal, ethical and inclusive practices related to pharmacy, that are required to go into practice. You will gain the skills that you will need for professional practice such as analysing prescriptions, dispensing relevant products and completing the relevant records. It also ensures you can interpret and apply law and ethics using problem solving, and professional judgement.

Wellbeing and Health

30 credits

This module introduces you to the principles of the role of a professional pharmacist and the various responsibilities in providing healthcare. You will explore the principles of health, wellbeing and prescribing attributes. You will gain the knowledge to enable you to respond to symptoms, recognise adverse drug reactions and other interactions. You will also develop communication skills and learn about health promotion.

Academic and Professional Skills Portfolio

0 credits

This module is designed to encourage student engagement, develop reflective learning and professionalism as well as assessing the competence and decision-making skills, in various clinical and legal elements of professional practice, of the students who are future pharmacists. This module will introduce you to Future Skills through engagement with Navigate including the three Navigate workshops.

Year 2 places more emphasis on the role of hospital, community and industrial pharmacists. You will integrate science with practice, learning through case studies how chemistry, pharmacology and pharmaceutics affect clinical practice. You will also learn about conditions that affect the central nervous system, such as depression and those that affect the cardiovascular system such as atrial fibrillation.

Core modules

Cardiorespiratory and Endocrine

30 credits

This module describes the underlying mechanisms of common cardiovascular, respiratory and endocrine disease and their treatments. You will learn about the aetiology of cardiovascular and respiratory disease and endocrine dysfunction. You will apply pharmacological, physiological, chemistry and pharmaceutical principles, and evidence-based medicine to effectively diagnose, prevent, delay or manage a disease.

The Central Nervous System, Gastrointestinal Tract and Immunology

30 credits

This module provides a foundation to understand the structure and function of the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal system, including the effects of dysfunction on an individual's physical health and mental well-being. You will learn about common neurological, psychiatric, and gastrointestinal disorders, covering their symptoms, underlying pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and treatment side-effects. You will also cover central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract infections, focussing on common bacterial, viral, and fungal sources. You will explore drug development and individual variations to treatment of neurological, psychiatric, and gastrointestinal system disorders, including the development of specialist formulations used in the management of these conditions.

Clinical Skills 1

30 credits

This module will further develop diagnostic and consultation skills. It will introduce you to varied consultation models to manage a structured and inclusive consultation. Through simulated and experiential learning opportunities, you will learn how to assimilate and evaluate resources, pathology data, guidance and patient factors to make diagnostic and prescribing decisions. The module includes a portfolio of clinical and physical skills assessments and basic first aid. You will have placement opportunities to practise your consultation, clinical assessment skills and work within a team. You will evidence your skills and competencies gained by completing an e-portfolio. This module will also introduce you to Future Skills through engagement with Explore supported by a designated tutor.

Drug Design, Delivery and Quality Control

30 credits

This module looks at key reactions for the synthesis of organic drug molecules including issues around the sustainable product of drugs. Your analytical techniques will be extended to include Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a particular focus on problem solving, formulation, the mechanistic chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry and pharmaceutical analysis.

You will learn about the key importance of regulatory affairs associated with drug development, such as clinical trials, licensing and registration.

Academic and Professional Portfolio

0 credits

This module is designed to develop your reflective learning, goal setting, and professionalism as well as assessing the competence and decision-making skills, in various clinical and legal elements of professional practice you will need as a future pharmacist.

Year 3 focuses on body systems and disease states. Examples of study include: the role of the liver in health and disease; cancer – its causes, the science behind its treatment and the clinical management of cancer patients; and diabetes – its public health impact and management. You will have opportunities to learn alongside other future healthcare professionals, and talk to patients about their conditions and treatment.

Core modules

Clinical Skills 2

30 credits

This module will enhance your diagnostic and consultations skills including selection of appropriate assessments and examinations to confirm a diagnosis, treatment selection and ongoing monitoring. You will be introduced to clinical reasoning and shared decision models to enable you to conduct a person-centred consultation. Through simulated and experiential learning opportunities, you will learn how to assimilate and evaluate resources, pathology data and guidance to reach effective and safe prescribing decisions. Through case-based scenarios, you will learn how to manage medical complications and emergencies and patients with co-morbidities. You will evidence the skills and competencies you have gained by completing an e-portfolio. This module will also introduce you to Future Skills through engagement with Apply.

Endocrine, the Eye, Reproduction and Inflammation

30 credits

This module will deal with physiology and pathology of the eye and endocrine and reproductive systems and inflammatory processes and how they can be affected by, or cause disease. The chemistry of the drugs which affect the endocrine, the eye and reproductive systems and those used to treat inflammatory disease and their relevant structure activity relationships will be covered together with the various formulations used to ensure optimal drug delivery in these areas. You will use a series of patient centred case studies to link the scientific content and the application of pharmaceutical care to treat and manage patients, in a variety of settings from disease prevention, managing risks, disease identification, responding to symptoms in the community pharmacy, prescribing and dispensing, through to the management of hospitalised patients.

Infection, Immunology, Haematology and Cancer

30 credits

This module will develop your knowledge of the immune system in health and disease including the use of vaccines, management, prevention and control of infections and the rational use of anti-infective agents. You will explore cancer as a disease, including the management of common cancers and oncological emergencies. The mechanisms of action and practical applications of chemotherapy are described together with novel drug targeting and palliative care. You will also learn about blood cell disorders and their management.

Neurology, Mental Health and Cardiovascular

30 credits

This module will examine the physiology and pathology of the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, the chemistry of relevant drugs, formulations and structure-activity relationships. This includes the more complex elements of assessing, diagnosing and treating central nervous system (CNS) disorders and prescribing and optimising treatment for mental health.

Academic and Professional Skills Portfolio

0 credits

This module is designed to develop your reflective learning, self-confidence and professionalism as well as assessing the competence and decision-making skills, in various clinical and legal elements of professional practice, for your role as a future pharmacist.

A major element of Year 4 is the research-based project. For this you will receive tuition in research skills. A problem-based approach is used for advanced teaching in areas such as pharmaceutical technology and biotechnology. Professional practice topics include advanced prescription analysis, risk management and drug interventions, as well as the wider role of the pharmacist in pharmaceutical care and public health. Students run themed health campaigns directly to the public and also virtually via social media. A total of 20 placement and inter-professional activity days, mostly in hospital or community pharmacies, are spread throughout the course. These serve to introduce and develop professional skills.

Core modules

Clinical Skills and Leadership

60 credits

This module will incorporate the business and financial aspects of pharmacy. It will enable you to work within a team to demonstrate leadership and mentoring skills. Through simulated exercises, you will assess local public health needs, inequalities, priorities to recommend a service or run a campaign while understanding resources limitations, while considering risk management, risk mitigation and quality improvement. You will demonstrate effective consultation and prescribing skills, while considering resources and legal and ethical frameworks.

Integrated and Holistic Therapeutics

30 credits

This module is designed to integrate advanced clinical and scientific concepts as they relate to patient care. Using complex patient cases with multiple comorbidities as the basis for group discussions, you will learn how to apply your clinical skills and scientific knowledge to provide the most appropriate recommendations.

Research Project

30 credits

You will undertake a substantial piece of original research, clinical audit or service evaluation that requires the collection of data and subsequent analysis of that data.

By completing a mini-research project, you will learn about the types and principles of research methods, methods used for literature reviews, study design methods, data collection, analysis and interpretation, and research ethics, and demonstrate your presentation skills.

Academic and Professional Portfolio

0 credits

This module will develop your reflective learning and professionalism as well as assessing the competence and decision-making skills, in various clinical and legal elements of professional practice needed for your role as a future pharmacist.

Future Skills

Knowledge to give you the edge

Embedded within every course curriculum and throughout the whole Kingston experience, Future Skills will play a role in shaping you to become a future-proof graduate, providing you with the skills most valued by employers such as problem-solving, digital competency, and adaptability.

As you progress through your degree, you'll learn to navigate, explore and apply these graduate skills, learning to demonstrate and articulate to employers how future skills give you the edge.

At Kingston University, we're not just keeping up with change, we're creating it.

A female engineering student, in the engineering lab.

Entry requirements

Typical offer 2024

UCAS tariff points: 120-136 for MPharm (Hons); 80-88 for MPharm (Hons) including foundation year.

A-levels to include Chemistry with a minimum of a grade B and at least one of the following: Mathematics, Physics or Biology with a minimum of a grade B.

Alternatively, we consider applicants holding a BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science (with a minimum DDD) alongside an A-level Chemistry with a minimum of a grade B.

Candidates are normally required to hold GCSEs in Mathematics and English Language at grade C/4 or above.

Enhanced DBS check and health check. Shortlisted applicants will be invited for an interview.

Alternative routes

We will consider a range of alternative Level 3 qualifications such as an Access Course in Applied Science which has been passed with 128 UCAS points. Applicants must also hold an A-Level in Chemistry with a minimum of a grade B.

We will no longer accept admission/transfers to MPharm (UCAS course code B230), from any foundation route with the exception on those applicant/students coming from a Pharmacy Foundation, both internally and externally. We no longer accept admission/transfers from any BSc in scientific areas.

Interview

The interview for the MPharm programme is 30 minutes with a multi-station format to assess the applicant academic skills, communication skills, motivation and experience to study pharmacy and their values and judgements in relation to situational scenarios.

Acceptance onto the MPharm programme will be conditional upon a satisfactory enhanced disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) and satisfactory health checks.

Health checks

Students enrolling onto the MPharm are required to complete a health check questionnaire and based on the outcome they may need to provide evidence of immunisation or health status and maybe requested to obtain immunisation against vaccine preventable diseases to ensure their safety and the safety of the public during placements.

Covid-19 vaccination requirement

The Nursing and Midwifery Council, General Pharmaceutical Council and Social Work England strongly encourage everyone eligible to be fully vaccinated against Covid 19 to keep yourselves and your community safe.

We are aware that some placement providers may require their staff and students to be fully vaccinated for some clinical areas. The University position is to strongly recommend everyone eligible to be fully vaccinated for health and care courses.

You can book your vaccinations here.

You can read information about Coronavirus vaccines here.

International

We welcome applications from International Applicants. All non-UK applicants must meet our English language requirements. For this course it is:

  • TOEFL iBT 88 (R=20, L=19, S=21, W=20)
  • Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE) with an overall score of 59 and no elements less than 59.
  • IELTS a minimum 6.0 overall grade in IELTS (Academic) with no components lower than 5.5.

Country-specific information

You will find more information on country specific entry requirements in the International section of our website.

Find your country:

Typical offer and UCAS points explained

Like most universities, we use the UCAS Tariff point system for our course entry requirements.

Find out more about UCAS Tariff points and see how A-level, AS level, BTEC Diploma and T-level qualifications translate to the points system.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching includes lectures, workshops, tutorials, seminars and practical classes, backed up by computer-assisted learning, problem-based learning and self-directed study. A unique feature of the course is that a significant component of teaching is by scientists and clinicians at the medical school at St George's, University of London. As well as being taught by practising pharmacists, doctors and pharmaceutical scientists you will also work with hospital and community pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. You will also have contact and learn from patients.

Assessment includes module (not modular) exams, coursework and practical assessments including professional and clinical skills.

Guided independent study (self-managed time)

When not attending timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for final assignments. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the online virtual learning platform.

Academic support

Our academic support team here at Kingston University provides help in a range of areas.

Dedicated personal tutor

When you arrive, we'll introduce you to your personal tutor. This is the member of academic staff who will provide academic guidance, be a support throughout your time at Kingston and show you how to make the best use of all the help and resources that we offer at Kingston University.

Your workload

Type of learning and teaching 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 1
  • Scheduled learning and teaching: 499 hours
  • Placement: 30 hours
  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 821 hours
Year 2
  • Scheduled learning and teaching: 431 hours
  • Placement: 112 hours
  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 686 hours
Year 3
  • Scheduled learning and teaching: 386 hours
  • Placement: 187 hours
  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 571 hours
Year 4
  • Scheduled learning and teaching: 233 hours
  • Placement: 300 hours
  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 692 hours

How you will be assessed

Type of assessment

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 1
  • Coursework: 31%
  • Practical: 20%
  • Exams: 49%
Year 2
  • Coursework: 27%
  • Practical: 30%
  • Exams: 44%
Year 3
  • Coursework: 17%
  • Practical: 38%
  • Exams: 45%
Year 4
  • Coursework: 38%
  • Practical: 36%
  • Exams: 26%

 

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Your timetable

Your individualised timetable is normally available to students within 48 hours of enrolment. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled learning and teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 6pm. For undergraduate students, Wednesday afternoons are normally reserved for sports and cultural activities, but there may be occasions when this is not possible. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Class sizes

To give you an indication of class sizes, this course normally enrols 150 students and lecture sizes are normally 90-150. However this can vary by module and academic year.

What our students say

Pharmacy student Arzoo Parveen talks about her experiences of studying at Kingston:

Pharmacy student Maria Kyriakidou talks about her experiences of studying at Kingston:

Staff teaching on this course

This course is delivered by the School of Life Sciences and Chemistry.

The School of Life Sciences, Pharmacy and Chemistry offers an outstanding and diverse portfolio of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in biological and biomedical sciences, chemistry, forensic science, pharmacy, pharmacological and pharmaceutical sciences, and sport science and nutrition.

We've invested heavily in the development of new facilities including laboratories for teaching and research to provide students with access to ultra-modern equipment in a wide range of teaching facilities.

Postgraduate students may run or assist in lab sessions and may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

Facilities

Pharmacy simulation suites

In 2022, our two hi-tech pharmacy simulation suites were opened at Kingston University by healthcare pioneer Professor Dame Elizabeth Anionwu. The simulation suites consist of a mock hospital ward, pharmacy dispensing suite and GP surgery, and are equipped with the latest technology including patient simulator manikins that students can administer drugs to and monitor their pulse and breathing. These suites enable students to learn in a safe environment that simulates real-life healthcare settings.

The hospital ward features six beds with drug cabinets and curtains, a nurse's station and equipment that can be used to assess students' bedside manner and debrief them on best practice. The ward also leads into a pharmacy dispensing suite where students can practice prescribing the correct medication, and the right quantity, for certain illnesses. The GP suite has six cubicles for students to simulate seeing patients within a surgery environment, with desks and pedestals. Three of the bays have couches and the other three have chairs for patients to be examined.

Pharmacy lab

Central to your learning is our pharmacy practice laboratory, designed to allow you to experience what it is like in a real pharmacy and finesse your skills before you start working in the health service. Based at our Penrhyn Road campus, the centre includes:

  • 40 medicine-dispensing stations
  • a pharmacy counter
  • a consulting area
  • computers connected to the Pharmacy Manager System (used in many local pharmacies).

You will practise your people-skills and diagnostic skills through role plays, taking it in turns to play the patient. Other role plays include advising doctors (usually played by experienced tutors) on how to deal with prescribing errors and clinical problems. When dispensing prescriptions, you will have to make all the same checks that you would make in a real pharmacy, including:

  • analysing prescriptions to check they have been filled in correctly by doctors
  • checking clinical issues such as how one medicine might interact with another
  • advising pretend patients on how to take their prescriptions.

Other facilities

There is a wide range of facilities for practical work at our Penrhyn Road campus, where this course is based. You will have access to a modern environment with the latest equipment, including:

  • the Eadweard Muybridge building with state-of the art laboratories
  • specialist equipment, such as:
    • gas and liquid chromatography
    • electron microscopy
    • a range of spectrometers, including mass spectrometers, infrared spectrometers and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers
    • nuclear science equipment
    • thermal analysis
    • x-ray diffractometers
    • electrochemical analysis.
  • computing laboratories and a team of IT technicians to offer assistance.

The Library offers:

  • subject libraries, plus a free inter-library loan scheme to other libraries in the Greater London area
  • online database subscriptions
  • a growing selection of resource materials.

Course fees and funding

2024/25 fees for this course

The tuition fee you pay depends on whether you are assessed as a 'Home' (UK), 'Islands' or 'International' student. In 2024/25 the fees for this course are:

 Fee category Amount
Home (UK students) £9,250*
Foundation Year: £9,250**
International Year 1 (2024/25): £18,100
Year 2 (2025/26): £18,800
Year 3 (2026/27): £19,600
Year 4 (2027/28): £20,400

* If your course involves a foundation year, the fee for that year for Home (UK) students will be £9,250 in 2024/25. The fees shown above apply for Year 1 of the degree from 2024/25 onwards (fees may rise in line with inflation for future academic years).

For full time programmes of a duration of more than one academic year, the published fee is an annual fee, payable each year, for the duration of the programme. Your annual tuition fees cover your first attempt at all of the modules necessary to complete that academic year. A re-study of any modules will incur additional charges calculated by the number of credits. Home tuition fees may be subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body. Full time taught International fees are subject to an annual increase and are published in advance for the full duration of the programme.

Eligible UK students can apply to the Government for a tuition loan, which is paid direct to the University. This has a low interest rate which is charged from the time the first part of the loan is paid to the University until you have repaid it.

** Foundation fees are awaiting the outcomes of the Government's 'Higher education policy statement and reform consultation'.

2023/24 fees for this course

The tuition fee you pay depends on whether you are assessed as a 'Home' (UK), 'Islands' or 'International' student. In 2023/24 the fees for this course are:

 Fee category Amount
Home (UK students) £9,250*
Foundation Year: £9,250
International Year 1 (2023/24): £16,200
Year 2 (2024/25): £16,500
Year 3 (2025/26): £16,800
Year 4 (2026/27): £17,100

* If your course involves a foundation year, the fee for that year for Home (UK) students will be £9,250 in 2023/24. The fees shown above apply for Year 1 of the degree from 2023/24 onwards (fees may rise in line with inflation for future academic years).

For full time programmes of a duration of more than one academic year, the published fee is an annual fee, payable each year, for the duration of the programme. Your annual tuition fees cover your first attempt at all of the modules necessary to complete that academic year. A re-study of any modules will incur additional charges calculated by the number of credits. Home tuition fees may be subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body. Full time taught International fees are subject to an annual increase and are published in advance for the full duration of the programme.

Eligible UK students can apply to the Government for a tuition loan, which is paid direct to the University. This has a low interest rate which is charged from the time the first part of the loan is paid to the University until you have repaid it.

Note for EU students: UK withdrawal from the European Union

The Government has recently announced that new students from the European Union and Swiss Nationals starting their course after August 2021 will no longer be eligible for a student loan in England for Undergraduate or Postgraduate studies from the 2021/22 academic year. This decision only applies to new EU students starting after 2021/22. If you are an existing/continuing EU student, you will continue to be funded until you graduate or withdraw from your course.

Need to know more?

Our undergraduate fees and funding section provides information and advice on money matters.

Additional costs

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs that are not covered by tuition fees which students will need to consider when planning their studies. Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, access to shared IT equipment and other support services. Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

Where a course has additional expenses, we make every effort to highlight them. These may include optional field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering), security checks such as DBS, uniforms, specialist clothing or professional memberships.

Textbooks

Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. You may prefer to buy your own copy of key textbooks; this can cost between £50 and £250 per year.

Computer equipment

There are open-access networked computers available across the University, plus laptops available to loan. You may find it useful to have your own PC, laptop or tablet which you can use around campus and in halls of residence. Free WiFi is available on each campus. You may wish to purchase your own computer, which can cost between £100 and £3,000 depending on your course requirements.

Photocopying and printing

In the majority of cases, written coursework can be submitted online. There may be instances when you will be required to submit work in a printed format. Printing, binding and photocopying costs are not included in your tuition fees, this may cost up to £100 per year.

Travel

Travel costs are not included in your tuition fees but we do have a free intersite bus service which links the campuses, Surbiton train station, Kingston-upon-Thames train station, Norbiton train station and halls of residence.

DBS check

The University pays for the processing of the application which is £51 but students are expected to pay a small fee (approximately £7) to the Post Office to get their ID documents verified and £13 per year for subscribing to the Update Service. This subscription allows universities and potential employers to view any changes to students' DBS.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Kingston University will supply you with a lab coat and safety goggles at the start of the year.

Accreditation

The Master of Pharmacy (MPharm) degree is fully accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council.

After you graduate

Careers and progression

You'll graduate ready for the next steps towards becoming a pharmacist in the UK. This is a year's foundation training in an approved pharmaceutical establishment and passing the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) registration exam.

Employability preparation at Kingston University

In addition to building expertise in your own discipline, our courses will also help you to develop key transferable skills that you'll need for professional life or further study once you graduate.

As well as a range of careers and employability activities at Kingston, we also offer you the chance to apply and develop your skills in live contexts as an integral part of your course. Opportunities include:

  • placements
  • working or studying abroad
  • volunteering
  • peer mentoring roles
  • internship opportunities within and outside the University.

In your final year, you'll get the opportunity to complete a major 'capstone' project where you can apply the knowledge and skills you have acquired to a range of real issues in different contexts. This is a great way to learn and is a valuable bridge to employment or further research at masters level.

Courses available after you graduate

If you decide that you would like to go on to postgraduate study after your undergraduate course, we offer a 10% discount on our postgraduate course tuition fees to our alumni.

What our students say

I chose pharmacy at Kingston University due to the placements it offers. Furthermore, it's located by the River Thames and has many shopping and entertainment facilities. In addition to this, it's only 30 minutes by train from the centre of London.

Coming from Greece, I was able to build my personality and independence as well as meet students from different backgrounds. This multicultural experience gave me the chance to create new friendships that will last for life.

Maria Kyriakidou – Pharmacy MPharm

I have always been interested in science and finding out things to do with medicines, so I thought this would be the perfect course and, so far, I have enjoyed everything about it. The course is taught at an appropriate pace and I like the lectures.

The practicals have interested me most, especially Professional Practice. We are put in a pharmacist's shoes for a few hours a week and this enables us to do dispensing which is really enjoyable.

Through the University I have also done both community and hospital pharmacy placements. These have helped me understand more about the way pharmacies work in the different environments. Kingston in general is a nice place. The lecturers are friendly and I've made lots of friends here. I look forward to coming to University every day."

Rebecca Assafa – Pharmacy MPharm

Pharmacy at Kingston

Meet pharmacy student Josh and find out about his journey to becoming a registered pharmacist.

Becoming a pharmacist

To become a pharmacist you need to:

  • achieve an accredited four-year degree in pharmacy;
  • satisfactorily complete a year of pre-registration foundation training in approved pharmaceutical establishments; and
  • pass the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) professional registration exam.

This course's accreditation means that if you graduate with an MPharm from Kingston University you can:

  • progress to register for your pre-registration foundation training; and
  • after carrying out your pre-registration foundation training and passing the GPhC registration exam, go on to become a pharmacist in Great Britain.

You can then work as a pharmacist in a hospital, GP practice, community pharmacy or the pharmaceutical industry. A number of other healthcare-related jobs will also be open to you.

Fitness to Practise

Annual self-declarations will be required during the MPharm course. New conduct issues may be referred to the pharmacy department Fitness to Practise (FtP) Committee for consideration. Further details can be found on our pharmacy department FtP blog.

The Department of Pharmacy at Kingston University is part of the Excluded Students Database. Excluded Students Database runs between Medical, Dental, Pharmacy, Veterinary Schools Councils, and General Medical Council in order to verify the applicant FtP. This is used only for FtP purposes in order to protect patients and the public, and to prevent fraudulent applications.

How we work with other organisations

St George's, University of London

This course is run jointly by Kingston University and St George's, University of London. Most of the teaching takes place at Kingston, but you will also have access to the specialist facilities and staff expertise of St George's.

Industrial placement

The Clinical Pharmacy module includes placements in hospitals and community pharmacies. This gives you the chance to apply your academic studies to real situations and experience on-the-job training.

Key information set

The scrolling banner(s) below display some key factual data about this course (including different course combinations or delivery modes of this course where relevant).

Course changes and regulations

The information on this page reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. To improve your student experience and the quality of your degree, we may review and change the material information of this course. Course changes explained.

Programme Specifications for the course are published ahead of each academic year.

Regulations governing this course can be found on our website.