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Talent

Creative talent you can use in your organisation

Businesses and other organisations are only as good as their ideas. Therefore it makes sense to source people who can offer solutions and creative insight. Kingston School of Art develops creative people who can add value to organisations like yours.

Their success is your success

Students from Kingston School of Art succeed in the commercial world, with the vast majority going on to lead and work in the creative industries. But before they graduate, you can make the most of their talents and skills to bring new ideas into your organisation. In exchange, our students will benefit from live industry experience.

Creating businesses and jobs

Our students also go on to set up their own businesses. To be successful, they need insights into the commercial world. Working with industry before graduating improves de‐risks their start‐ups.

Real world case studies

Below, we showcase some examples of our talented students. Please contact us if you have a challenging project that would benefit from our creative input.

How could the Women's Institute celebrate with style?

The Women's Institute was one hundred years old in 2015 and its members wanted to celebrate its centenary in style. They decided to produce and show a range of knitwear garments to show off their famous talents in a contemporary context. All they needed was some help from the experts.

Help from Kingston School of Art

Twenty one members of the third sector organisation volunteered to help with knitting and stitching. The school supplied eleven up‐and‐coming designers to help the Institute make its fashion show a reality.

An eclectic and contemporary range of knitwear

The cream of Kingston School of Art's final year students designed the patterns. The volunteers at the Women's Institute used these patterns to produce the component parts.The students finally brought these pieces together to create the finished garments.

The young designers and experienced knitters collaborated to create a diverse knitwear collection. This range included sophisticated sportswear and an androgynous trouser suit and jumper. All outfits were designed to blend the history and values of the Women's Institute with contemporary fashion.

The range of outfits was showcased to more than 5000 members of the WI at their Centenary Annual Meeting, held in the Albert Hall. The garments were also displayed at the Knitting and Stitching Show 2015 at London's Olympia followed by a stint in the Loop conference in Glasgow.

How could the Women's Institute celebrate with style?
An amazing climax to a successful collaboration

My starting point was the inherent strength of a door frame within a wall ‐ they often remain standing when many of the supporting walls fall down.

Younghwa Lee, MA Design student

Younghwa Lee, MA Design student

Saving lives by design: the earthquake door

MA Design student Younghwa Lee worked on a design to save lives in earthquake regions. She designed a domestic door which can convert in five seconds to become a protective shelter.

Intelligent observation

Younghwa explained; "My starting point was the inherent strength of a door frame within a wall ‐ they often remain standing when many of the supporting walls fall down. Also there are more doors inside most homes than there are people so everyone in the house should be able to find a door." She also observed that there is usually a 15 second window between the start of an earthquake and when building damage occurs.

Intelligent design

Initially, Younghwa's door looks unremarkable but, in an emergency, it can swivel horizontally on a central pivot a little less than a metre above the ground. This also allows debris to slide off. At the same time, the door folds horizontally so the bottom half of it remains on the ground, anchoring it to the floor and providing additional protection. There is a small cabinet built into the door frame in which Younghwa has housed a wind‐up torch, sachets of drinking water and medical supplies.

It's a big confidence boost for her to have someone like Kate Nash wear her designs and a real endorsement of what she is all about.

Todd Lynn, Lecturer

Todd Lynn, Lecturer

Fashion designs fit for pop idols

Many fashion students dream of seeing celebrities wearing their outfits one day. That is exactly what happened to Kingston School of Art graduate Lydia Bolton. An award-winning musician donned one of her designs in a high profile show. Singer Kate Nash is well known for her hit single Foundations and other tracks such as Good Summer. In 2016 she performed alongside Charlotte Church at a David Bowie tribute at the Wilderness Festival in Oxfordshire. There, she wore an outstanding outfit designed by Lydia Bolton.

Distinctive style

Lydia's graduation collection celebrates the ultimate female tomboy and was inspired by the iconic style of Missy Elliott. She designs tracksuits with a difference, boldly embellished and branded with her distinctive logo.

From show to show

Lydia unveiled her womenswear collection at Graduate Fashion Week in East London. Kate Nash's stylist, Rebekah Roy, was there to see it. This led to Lydia lending the stylist a couple of garments for Kate to wear in concert.

Celebrity endorsement

Kingston School of Art lecturer Todd Lynn describes Lydia's designs as having the individuality and personality to stand out from the crowd. He said, "It's a big confidence boost for her to have someone like Kate Nash wear her designs and a real endorsement of what she is all about." It is also an excellent illustration of the high standards of Kingston School of Art students and graduates.

Enrolling at Kingston School of Art helped me find a balance between thinking creatively and communicating through theoretical design.

Akosua Afriyie‐Kumi, graduate

Akosua Afriyie‐Kumi, graduate

A new ethical design business for Ghana

Kingston School of Art nurtures great success stories across the world. Akosua Afriyie‐Kumi graduated in 2014. Just months later, she was a director of her own handbag brand, A A K S.

Sustainable job creation in Northern Ghana

The mission of A A K S is largely to show different forms of weaving in innovative handbag designs. Akosua is achieving this objective and creating sustainable jobs by employing talented women in Northern Ghana to manufacture the handbags.

Craftsmanship and ethical values

The A A K S brand stems from Akosua's strong understanding of craftsmanship and ethical practices. She expresses a strong sense of identity and quality throughout the production process. Each piece of the collection is unique and tells a story through detail, colour and shape.

Kingston School of Art gave Akosua the foundations

Akosua is very grateful to Kingston School of Art for preparing her for the real world of fashion and helping to develop her potential. She speaks very highly of the school and its tutors: "Enrolling at Kingston School of Art helped me find a balance between thinking creatively and communicating through theoretical design."

Kingston School of Art is building its global reach and welcomes talented students from across the world.

Talk to us

Please contact us if you have a project that would benefit from our creative input.

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