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Dance and Drama BA(Hons)

Attendance UCAS code Year of entry
3 years full time WW45 2019
2020

Why choose this course?

This combined dance and drama degree will allow you to combine critical and creative practice, giving you the skills to master physical performance in both subjects. 

On this course there is no barrier between theory and practice: theory will help you understand and make the most of practice, while practice is used to shed light on theory. The degree is designed to allow you to develop your own identities as informed dance and theatre-makers. By studying a wide variety of practices independently and with others, you will gain knowledge of the industry as a whole, and learn how your interests might fit into the bigger performing arts picture.

What you will study

You'll work on a range of workshops and across a wide range of performance styles, which reflects today's professional practices. Through active technique classes and seminar/workshops, you'll acquire analytical, choreographic, directorial, ensemble and performance techniques that will equip you to work in the performance industry. In particular, the course enables you to study a wide range of popular and non-Western forms and is designed to distinguish between high and low art forms.

You will be encouraged to develop projects through workshops, rehearsals and full productions. You will regularly take part in Kingston's International Youth Arts Festival and the Camden Fringe Festival, gaining valuable professional experience and adding to your employability.

Module listing

You'll work on a range of workshops and across a wide range of performance styles. Through practical classes, you'll acquire analytical, choreographic, directorial, ensemble and performance techniques that will equip you to work in the performance industry.

You will be encouraged to develop projects through workshops, rehearsals and full productions. You'll also take part in Kingston's International Youth Arts Festival and the Camden Fringe Festival, gaining valuable professional experience and adding to your employability.

Modules

Each level is made up of four modules each worth 30 credit points. Typically, a student must complete 120 credits at each level.

Year 1

  • This Level 4 module is designed to provide you with knowledge and understanding of Western Theatrical Dance history. The module introduces you to the histories and practices embedded in Western theatrical dance and the research methods associated with the study of dance history.

    The combination of practice and theory will enable you to establish, identify and experience the relationship between dance histories, theory and practice. In a series of tutor-led seminars/practical sessions and workshops, you will consider the historical contexts that gave rise to and changed dance practices, the dancing body and dance performances. For example, discussions and practical sessions may include theories and histories embedded in the dancing body; Natural Movement in Britain; Reconstructing the past: re-enacting the cannon; Judson Church: rethinking dance performance and the dancing body.

    Besides learning subject-specific theory and practice, the module includes sessions dedicated to the development of academic skills. These sessions will enable you to develop your academic writing and key research skills such as information search and retrieval, bibliographical research, identifying and selecting relevant information, and referencing. 

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  • This is a year long, core Level 4 module for all students taking dance programmes at Kingston.  In this module you will study dances from an anthropological perspective through both theoretical and critical analysis, and embodied practice and performance.  You will study, analyse and embody dance practices from a range of cultures and societies.  Discussion will include how dances have been, and currently are regarded by a range of ‘audiences' and their participants, as well as analysis of the specific contexts of their production, reception and consumption.  Inherent in these discussions are notions of change, transmission and migration of dance forms and practices to other contexts. You will be encouraged to explore the relationships between dance and culture, dance and identity, and dance and the community, as well as reflecting on the role, place and value of dance in a range of cultures and societies, including their own.  Throughout the course you will participate in blocks of practical workshops that will develop technical and expressive skills in relevant dance styles.

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  • This module compliments and extends knowledge and understanding of key concepts of performance developed in Making Theatre Happen by focusing on the relationship between the actor and the written playtext.

    There are two interweaving strands and each is designed to serve as a foundation for your ongoing studies.  You will explore fundamental components of drama such as plot, action, character and dialogue and examine ways in which each is presented in a series of written playtexts.  These plays are studied in detail and each is identified as a pretext for performance.  You are introduced to ways of interrogating the texts and develop a deeper knowledge and understanding of the relationship between what is written on the page and what is presented on the stage. The same playtexts are also used to explore a range of differing performance methodologies that can be utilised to identify the performance potentials of a text in a workshop environment.  You are led through cycles of Preparation, Exploration and Realisation - understanding what these terms mean and the actions they consist of will be an important aspect of the module - and not only learn appropriate ways in which to create intelligent and imaginative performance informed by a written text but also develop a range of acting skills necessary to perform them effectively. 

    Throughout the module you are also introduced to the basic principles of theatre lighting and sound and will be encouraged to explore the impact of these technical elements when used in a performance context.  

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  • This module is a core requirement for all drama students at Level 4 and runs throughout the academic year. It operates and is assessed in conjunction with DA4001 Staging Histories. The module introduces students to significant skills, vocabularies and methods associated with creating performance and explores ways in which these may be applied within a range of dramatic and theatrical contexts. The main features of this module are the study and practice of key elements of performance such as the use of space, time, force (or energy); body and voice; play; interpersonal interaction onstage and off; performance structure and dynamics; and the creation of dramatic meaning and theatrical effect. In the first part of the module students participate in a variety of tutor-led exercises designed to increase their understanding and skills in these areas. These are drawn from methodologies and techniques developed by 20th and 21st century practitioner-theorists such as Anne Bogart; Rudolph Laban, Jacques Lecoq and Augusto Boal. They are also introduced to the basic principles of theatre lighting and sound. In the second part of the module they apply what they have learned in a student-led, staff-supervised project based around material studied in DA4001 Staging Histories.

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Year 2

  • This core Level 5 module enables you to frame critical and analytical investigations of dance movement, dance works and dance events. Performing Theories combines practical sessions and lectures in order to introduce you to methodological tools, theoretical frameworks and critical writings in relation to dance performance and dance practices. 

    The module addresses a number of key methodologies used within 21st century dance research, including intertextuality in dance, the body politic and gender representations in performance.  These concepts will be explored through technique classes, repertoire sessions, video and live performance analysis and group discussions.  

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  • This is a core module for full-field Drama students and an option for those taking Drama as a major field. It builds on the knowledge, understanding and skills students gain in the Level 4 core module DA4002 Making Theatre Happen, enabling them to develop and adapt these within the context of devising theatre. It begins with an exploration of dramaturgical principles in relation to devised performance with a focus on how companies and practitioners select and respond to stimulus material of different kinds and how they shape that material into performance. Students study and critique devised productions and engage in creative exercises which enable them to experiment with a range of methods and techniques of devising. They then explore ways in which these approaches can be utilised and adapted within community and applied contexts. They are introduced to principles of theatre as social intervention, studying examples of applied theatre practice and participating in workshops focused around the employment of devising techniques in community contexts with a particular emphasis on collaborative methodology. For their assessment, students create a group-based devised performance They can choose to conceive of this as aimed at a specific audience such as a specific age group or community.  

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Optional Year

Year 3

  • This is a core requirement for full field Drama students and an option for students taking Drama as a major field. It continues from DA6001, enabling students to develop the ideas and research they have undertaken in that module and carry them through to realisation. It is a capstone project which allows students to draw together their learning from across the Drama programme and apply it in a 'real-world' context through the creation, rehearsal and performance of a theatre production.

    This module is largely undertaken through independent group-based rehearsal, although there is also a series of presentations and workshops addressing specific areas such as groupwork strategies, problem-solving, rehearsal planning and scheduling, managing budgets and publicity and marketing. Students form groups, select roles and choose scripts, themes and modes of performance based on the 'pitch' they made and the feedback received at the end of DA6001. The size of groups may vary but groups should not be made up of fewer than 5 students or more than 12. Each group will have a designated supervisor and a budget allocated on the basis of group size. The rehearsal process will be constructed around a series of formatively and summatively assessed stages such as work in progress performances, group and individual reflective exercises, submission of design and technical plans and presentation of publicity materials. Performances will be scheduled across a number of weeks in consultation with the Drama Technical Production Manager.

    Read full module description

     
  • This is a core requirement for full field Drama students and an option for students taking Drama as a major field. It enables students to develop ideas and research and carry them through to realisation. It is a capstone project which allows students to draw together their learning from across the Drama programme and apply it in a 'real-world' context through the creation, rehearsal and performance of a theatre production.

    This module is largely undertaken through independent group-based rehearsal, although there is also a series of presentations and workshops addressing specific areas such as groupwork strategies, problem-solving, rehearsal planning and scheduling, managing budgets and publicity and marketing. Students form groups, select roles and choose scripts, themes and modes of performance based on a  'pitch' they make  and the feedback received at the end of Teaching Block One. The size of groups may vary but groups should not be made up of fewer than 5 students or more than 12. Each group will have a designated supervisor and a budget allocated on the basis of group size. The rehearsal process will be constructed around a series of formatively and summatively assessed stages such as work in progress performances, group and individual reflective exercises, submission of design and technical plans and presentation of publicity materials. Performances will be scheduled across a number of weeks in consultation with the Drama Technical Production Manager.

    Read full module description

     

You will have the opportunity to study a foreign language, free of charge, during your time at the University on a not-for-credit basis as part of the Kingston Language Scheme. Options currently include: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

Most of our undergraduate courses support studying or working abroad through the University's Study Abroad or Erasmus programme.

Find out more about where you can study abroad:

If you are considering studying abroad, read what our students say about their experiences.

Key information set

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Contact our admissions team

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020 3308 9930*

*Calls cost 7p per minute from a UK landline plus your phone company's access charge. Calls to this number from mobiles are normally deductible from your inclusive minutes.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps

Contact our admissions team

Submit an enquiry

020 3308 9930*

*Calls cost 7p per minute from a UK landline plus your phone company's access charge. Calls to this number from mobiles are normally deductible from your inclusive minutes.

Location

This course is taught at Penrhyn Road

View Penrhyn Road on our Google Maps
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