Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences Foundation Degree (Pre-Pharmacy)

Why choose this course?

If you know you have potential but want support before starting a degree in Pharmacy or a pharmacy related degree, then this course could be perfect for you.

Successful completion of this course means you can join Year 2 of the Pharmacy MPharm programme. Alternatively, you may top-up your qualification to a BSc (Hons) in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences or Pharmaceutical Science.

This course studies the main areas of pharmacy and the pharmaceutical and chemical sciences. You'll take the same modules as students of Year 1 Pharmacy, plus additional modules in chemistry, mathematics and other subjects. You'll also be able to specialise in an area that interests you. Your scientific learning will be supported by academic and professional skills development.

Attendance UCAS code Year of entry
2 years full time F190 2021
Location Penrhyn Road

2020 entry

If you are planning to join this course in September 2020, please view the information about changes to courses for 2020/21 due to Covid-19.

 

Continuing students

Students who are continuing their studies with Kingston University in 2020/21 should refer to their Course Handbook for information about specific changes that have been, or may be, made to their course or modules being delivered in 2020/21. Course Handbooks are located within the Canvas course page.

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • This foundation degree has been accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council 
  • This course offers a good grounding in pharmacy related subjects. Once you successfully complete the course, you'll be able to join Year 2 of the Pharmacy MPharm course or top-up to a pharmacy-related BSc (Hons)
  • Many modules incorporate online blended learning, allowing you to study effectively when not on campus.

What you will study

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list as these could change before your year of entry. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Year 1

Year 2 MPharm route

Year 2 MChem route

Year 2 MPharmSci route

In Year 1 you will study core modules that cover each of the main subject areas in pharmacy and the pharmaceutical and chemical sciences. Your studies and professional development will be supported by an academic skills module.

Core modules

Academic and Professional Skills Portfolio

30 credits

This module provides some fundamental learning and academic skills for students on the Foundation Degree in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences. It is intended to introduce a number of key skills which you will need to draw on in your future academic and professional careers. Maths, study skills and academic writing are covered together with a personal development folder based on work-based placements. This module is designed to aid you to find successful employment.

Introduction to Pharmacy Practice

30 credits

This module is core for students of the Foundation Degree in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences. It is intended to form an introduction to pharmacy as a profession by considering its standing in the NHS and introducing the roles of the pharmacist. It provides an introduction to the legal and ethical aspects of the practice of pharmacy in the UK. Throughout the module you will develop a number of the core skills required for pharmacy practice including professionalism, IT skills, oral and written communication and numeracy.

Foundation Chemistry for Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

30 credits

This module deals with the fundamentals of atomic theory and an understanding of ionic and covalent bonding in chemistry. It provides an understanding of nomenclature, stereochemistry, and organic functional group chemistry at a level appropriate to subsequent modules. Concepts in physical and physical organic chemistry are introduced. The module is also intended to develop ideas in chemistry with application to pharmaceutical sciences. 

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the structure of atoms and molecules.
  • Differentiate between inductive and resonance effects of substituents in molecules; show a basic understanding of how molecules interact with effects of solvents, both polar and nonpolar; demonstrate how electron shifts lead to the formation and fission of bonds.
  • Utilise the equations involved in calculations of pH, pK and titration experiments; show how simple rate equations are used and how rate constants depend on the temperature. Calculate properties of solutions (particularly buffer solutions) such as pH and pKa.
  • Demonstrate how the basic rules of chemical nomenclature are applied to simple organic compounds, including E/Z and R/S isomers; draw diagrams indicating the conformations and stereochemistry of organic molecules;demonstrate a knowledge of the main types of organic reactions: addition, elimination and substitution, for simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds; understand reactions of the hydrocarbons and compounds derived from them.
  • Explain how ligands may complex and chelate to metal ions and describe the redox chemistry of these. Describe the importance of plants as a source of medicines. Recognise the structures, chirality and reactions of carbohydrates and proteins.
  • Acquire reliable experimental data, manipulate it numerically where necessary and report it concisely in a variety of word processed or other formats.
Life Science and Medicine

30 credits

This module is designed to introduce cell biology particularly with reference to the human body and pathological micro-organisms affecting it. In conjunction with biological concepts, this module is designed to pick up concepts in organic and physical chemistry covered in the parallel module (PY4130, Foundation Chemistry for Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences) and to go into them in more detail. On completing the module you will have the background biology and chemistry required to identify the intended target for disease and infection in relation to drug structure and functional groups.

In Year 2 you will have the opportunity to choose from a selection of option modules, enabling you to specialise in an area that particularly interests you.

Throughout the course there is an emphasis on a vocational application of knowledge. You will undertake a work placement in a related workplace for a minimum of one day a week - for example, in a community pharmacy or a pharmaceutical company. Work experience may be paid or voluntary and will help you put your studies into practice. We will help you find a placement if you are not already working in such a position when you start the course.

Core modules

Medicines, Health and Wellbeing

30 credits

This module is optional for students on the Foundation Degree in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences, although core for students wishing to progress to the MPharm. It allows you to examine health promotion within community pharmacy with reference to current campaigns. You will come up with your own health promotion materials. There is also a practical dispensing element which gives experience of handling different types of dosage forms. The module also allows you to go on a placement in a pharmacy-related workplace with access to patients. You will give detailed consideration as to why patients turn up for help from a pharmacist, how they can be most suitably helped and what special needs or requirements they may have. Approximately 15% of the teaching time is spent in practicals and workshops to emphasise these concepts, and an additional 15% are based in a workplace environment.

Cells, Tissues and Organ Systems

30 credits

This is a core module for the Foundation Degree in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences. It introduces biomolecules commonly found in cells, tissues and organ systems that make up the human body. The module is designed to give you a detailed knowledge of how the human body works with particular reference to disease states when appropriate. The delivery relies on Canvas to provide the majority of the background information with tutorials supporting discussion of this material.

The Science of Medicines

30 credits

This module is core in the Foundation Degree in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences for students who wish to progress onto the MPharm. It introduces key concepts in the manufacture and use of medicines in pharmaceutics. It provides you with an understanding of the links between fundamental physicochemical properties of drugs, the formulations of dosage forms and the route of delivery of drugs into the body. The making and labelling of extemporaneous preparations are undertaken as relevant to the clinical practice of pharmacy.

Introduction to Spectroscopy and Experimental Techniques

30 credits

This module provides an introduction to basic laboratory techniques and procedures such as weighing and volumetry, proceeding to descriptions of laboratory manipulations, elemental analysis and general practical knowledge.  There is included an introduction to spectroscopic techniques in terms of simple theory, as well as a practical introduction to the identification of simple organic compounds.  These compounds will sometimes be synthesised in the course of the practical element of the module, which will also serve to demonstrate laboratory techniques of preparation and purification of these organic materials.

In Year 2 you will have the opportunity to choose from a selection of option modules, enabling you to specialise in an area that particularly interests you.

Throughout the course there is an emphasis on a vocational application of knowledge. You will undertake a work placement in a related workplace for a minimum of one day a week - for example, in a community pharmacy or a pharmaceutical company. Work experience may be paid or voluntary and will help you put your studies into practice. We will help you find a placement if you are not already working in such a position when you start the course.

Core modules

Organic and Physical Chemistry

30 credits

This is a core module for chemistry degree courses. It introduces the structure and isomerism observed in organic molecules, and then describes the preparation and chemical reactions (including the mechanisms involved) of the hydrocarbons and monofunctional organic molecules. The main principles of molecular systems, chemical reactivity and kinetics, including those of gas-phase reactions, are described before presenting the essential principles of chemical thermodynamics and molecular quantum mechanics.

Inorganic and Environmental Chemistry

30 credits

This is a core module for progression to chemistry degree courses. The module introduces various bonding models including the structure and bonding of inorganic solids. Trends in the periodic table are illustrated by coverage of the chemistry of Group 1, 13 and 17 elements. The module introduces you to atmospheric and aquatic pollution and goes on to cover the impact of pollutants on the environment.

Introduction to Spectroscopy and Experimental Techniques

30 credits

This module provides an introduction to basic laboratory techniques and procedures such as weighing and volumetry, proceeding to descriptions of laboratory manipulations, elemental analysis and general practical knowledge.  There is included an introduction to spectroscopic techniques in terms of simple theory, as well as a practical introduction to the identification of simple organic compounds.  These compounds will sometimes be synthesised in the course of the practical element of the module, which will also serve to demonstrate laboratory techniques of preparation and purification of these organic materials.

Optional modules

Year 2 MChem route options

30 credits

Choose one from the following:

Work-based Dissertation
This module offers a chance to produce a dissertation on a work-based topic of the students' choosing which incorporates data from literature sources, as well as data collected from the work-based placement itself. This module will build upon components learnt, but in greater detail from the Academic and Professional Skills portfolio. The module facilitates the development of research skills and data collection in the workplace; incorporating communication, ICT and learning at an independent level.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Analyse and evaluate a range of literature sources of information.
  • Collect and analyse data from a workplace environment.
  • Prepare and present a substantial document of researched data and original analysis using contemporary IT tools.
  • Condense the above report into a short audio-visual presentation using IT presentation tools and technology; demonstrate the ability to answer questions on that presentation.

Medicines, Health and Wellbeing
This module examines health promotion within community pharmacy with reference to current campaigns and in response, to recommend health promotion materials. There is also a practical dispensing element which gives experience of handling different types of dosage forms. The module facilitates a placement in a pharmacy-related workplace with access to patients to assess why patients seek advice from the pharmacist, how they can be most suitably helped and what special needs or requirements they may have.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate effective communication skills and the ability to collect, evaluate and assimilate information through verbal and written presentations
  • Carry out extemporaneous compounding of complex pharmaceuticals, and the dispensing of simple commercially-produced preparations (including their labelling)
  • Discuss how pharmacy professionals can contribute to the promotion of good health and prevention of ill-health by choosing, after accessing and critically analysing information for various health promotion topics, strategies for health promotion for different health topics
  • Discuss factors affecting the health and illness from a patient's perspective and those factors that lead a patient to consult a healthcare professional, including consulting a pharmacist or referral to a pharmacy. The influence of social factors and inequalities on health will also be discussed
  • Apply appropriate counselling skills in the workplace to obtain information from the patient and ensure the patient acknowledges and understands the information provided
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the requirements of specific patient groups (including considerations of ethnicity) and special needs arising from disability together with suitable strategies for dealing with them.

Cells, Tissues and Organ Systems
This module introduces biomolecules commonly found in cells, tissues and organ systems that make up the human body. The module is designed to give a detailed knowledge of how the human body works with particular reference to disease states when appropriate.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the structure, properties and functions of biomolecules.
  • Relate with mechanistic detail the structure of cells and tissues to their function.
  • Describe how the functioning of selected individual organ systems is integrated in the whole body.
  • Relate human physiological systems to pathophysiological contexts.
  • Perform physiological experiments, clearly and accurately record experimental data and critically interpret the results.
  • Demonstrate report writing and independent learning skills.

The Science of Medicines
This module introduces key concepts in the manufacture and use of medicines in pharmaceutics and microbiology. The module provides an understanding of  the links between fundamental physicochemical properties of drugs, the formulation of drugs and the route of delivery of drugs into the body. Fundamental concepts relevant to the clinical microbiology of disease-causing organisms, their classification, their manipulation, and their use in manufacturing are also explored.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Understand the relevance of physico-chemical principles and techniques in the design, production and performance of disperse and, semi-solid dosage products for external and internal use.
  • Link the role of excipients (eg surface active agents) in the preparation and stability of drug delivery systems for efficacious administration to patients.
  • Describe the interaction of a physical system (ie formulation or preparation) with the physiological environment, and particularly with biological membranes.
  • Understand the fundamental aspects of disease-causing microbial organisms, their identification and manipulation, as well as the exploitation of microbes in the development of vaccines, sterility tests and recombinant biotechnology.
  • Conduct practical experimental procedures and generate reports related to the lecture and workshop course.

Core modules

Cells, Tissues and Organ Systems

30 credits

This is a core module for the Foundation Degree in Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences. It introduces biomolecules commonly found in cells, tissues and organ systems that make up the human body. The module is designed to give you a detailed knowledge of how the human body works with particular reference to disease states when appropriate. The delivery relies on Canvas to provide the majority of the background information with tutorials supporting discussion of this material.

Introduction to Spectroscopy and Experimental Techniques

30 credits

This module provides an introduction to basic laboratory techniques and procedures such as weighing and volumetry, proceeding to descriptions of laboratory manipulations, elemental analysis and general practical knowledge.  There is included an introduction to spectroscopic techniques in terms of simple theory, as well as a practical introduction to the identification of simple organic compounds.  These compounds will sometimes be synthesised in the course of the practical element of the module, which will also serve to demonstrate laboratory techniques of preparation and purification of these organic materials.

Optional modules

Year 2 MPharmSci Route options

30 credits

Choose two from the following:

Work-based Dissertation
This module offers a chance to produce a dissertation on a work-based topic of the students' choosing which incorporates data from literature sources, as well as data collected from the work-based placement itself. This module will build upon components learnt, but in greater detail from the Academic and Professional Skills portfolio. The module facilitates the development of research skills and data collection in the workplace; incorporating communication, ICT and learning at an independent level.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Analyse and evaluate a range of literature sources of information.
  • Collect and analyse data from a workplace environment.
  • Prepare and present a substantial document of researched data and original analysis using contemporary IT tools.
  • Condense the above report into a short audio-visual presentation using IT presentation tools and technology; demonstrate the ability to answer questions on that presentation.

Medicines, Health and Wellbeing
This module examines health promotion within community pharmacy with reference to current campaigns and in response, to recommend health promotion materials. There is also a practical dispensing element which gives experience of handling different types of dosage forms. The module facilitates a placement in a pharmacy-related workplace with access to patients to assess why patients seek advice from the pharmacist, how they can be most suitably helped and what special needs or requirements they may have.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate effective communication skills and the ability to collect, evaluate and assimilate information through verbal and written presentations
  • Carry out extemporaneous compounding of complex pharmaceuticals, and the dispensing of simple commercially-produced preparations (including their labelling)
  • Discuss how pharmacy professionals can contribute to the promotion of good health and prevention of ill-health by choosing, after accessing and critically analysing information for various health promotion topics, strategies for health promotion for different health topics
  • Discuss factors affecting the health and illness from a patient's perspective and those factors that lead a patient to consult a healthcare professional, including consulting a pharmacist or referral to a pharmacy. The influence of social factors and inequalities on health will also be discussed
  • Apply appropriate counselling skills in the workplace to obtain information from the patient and ensure the patient acknowledges and understands the information provided
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the requirements of specific patient groups (including considerations of ethnicity) and special needs arising from disability together with suitable strategies for dealing with them.

Organic and Physical Chemistry
This module introduces the structure and isomerism observed in organic molecules and further deals with the preparation and chemical reactions (including the mechanisms involved) of the hydrocarbons and monofunctional organic molecules. The main principles of molecular systems, chemical reactivity and kinetics, including those of gas-phase reactions, are described before presenting the essential principles of chemical thermodynamics and molecular quantum mechanics.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the structures and shapes of simple organic molecules, explaining the origins and effects of the different kinds of isomerism that can arise within them.
  • Describe the preparation and properties of hydrocarbons and monofunctional organic molecules, including the mechanisms involved in their reactions.
  • Explain the behaviour of gases and the kinetics of gas-phase reactions in molecular terms.
  • Apply thermodynamic and quantum mechanical principles to aspects of the energetics and structures of molecules, and to chemical reactions.
  • Carry out and report laboratory procedures according to given protocols.
  • Demonstrate appropriate Level 4 key skills in written communication, numeracy, data collection and analysis, including graphical analysis.

The Science of Medicines
This module introduces key concepts in the manufacture and use of medicines in pharmaceutics and microbiology. The module provides an understanding of  the links between fundamental physicochemical properties of drugs, the formulation of drugs and the route of delivery of drugs into the body. Fundamental concepts relevant to the clinical microbiology of disease-causing organisms, their classification, their manipulation, and their use in manufacturing are also explored.

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Understand the relevance of physico-chemical principles and techniques in the design, production and performance of disperse and, semi-solid dosage products for external and internal use.
  • Link the role of excipients (eg surface active agents) in the preparation and stability of drug delivery systems for efficacious administration to patients.
  • Describe the interaction of a physical system (ie formulation or preparation) with the physiological environment, and particularly with biological membranes.
  • Understand the fundamental aspects of disease-causing microbial organisms, their identification and manipulation, as well as the exploitation of microbes in the development of vaccines, sterility tests and recombinant biotechnology.
  • Conduct practical experimental procedures and generate reports related to the lecture and workshop course.

The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. The regulations governing this course are available on our website. If we have insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this may not be offered.

Entry requirements

Typical offer 2020

  • 72 UCAS points from a minimum of two A-levels or equivalent Level 3 qualifications.
  • A-levels to include Chemistry at a minimum of a grade D and Biology. General Studies and Critical Thinking not accepted

Alternatively, BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science with grades MMM.

Candidates are normally required to hold five GCSE subjects grades A*-C including Mathematics and English Language (or comparable numeric score under the newly reformed GCSE grading).

Entry requirements 2021

UCAS tariff points: 72

A-level (or equivalent) in Chemistry at grade D or above.

Interview

For this course the selection process may include an interview. The interviews may be on a one-to-one basis or in a group, and you may be given a task such as participating in a workshop, a short essay, a numeracy test, or a discussion to demonstrate your strengths in addition to any formal entry requirements. Further details about your interview will be sent with your interview invitation.

Alternative routes

We will consider a range of alternative Level 3 qualifications such as an Access Course in an appropriate subject which includes 45 level 3 credits in Chemistry and Biology passed at merit grade minimum.

International

We welcome applications from International Applicants. View our standard entry requirements from your country.

All non-UK applicants must meet our English language requirements. For this course it is Academic IELTS of 6.5, with no element below 6.0.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching include lectures, workshops, tutorials and practical classes.

Guided independent study

When not attending timetabled sessions you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for exams. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the online virtual learning platform.

Academic support

Our academic support team here at Kingston University provides help in a range of areas.

Dedicated personal tutor

When you arrive, we'll introduce you to your personal tutor. This is the member of academic staff who will provide academic guidance, be a support throughout your time at Kingston and who will show you how to make the best use of all the help and resources that we offer at Kingston University.

Your workload

Type of teaching and learning

Year 1

Year 1
  • Scheduled teaching: 383 hours
  • Placement: 104 hours
  • Guided independent study: 713 hours

How you will be assessed

Type of assessment

Year 1

Year 1
  • Coursework: 39%
  • Practical: 13%
  • Exams: 49%

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Your timetable

Your individualised timetable is normally available to students within 48 hours of enrolment. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 6pm. For undergraduate students, Wednesday afternoons are normally reserved for sports and cultural activities, but there may be occasions when this is not possible. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Class sizes

To give you an indication of class sizes, this course normally enrols 60 students and lecture sizes are normally 60­­.  However this can vary by module and academic year.

Who teaches this course

The course is based at the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing. Faculty staff have a wide range of experience across research and industry and continue to practice and research at the cutting edge of their discipline. This ensures that our courses are current and industry informed ensuring you get the most relevant and up to date education possible.

Staff will use their experience and professional networks to hone your skills and shape you into the next generation of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduates.

Postgraduate students may run or assist in lab sessions and may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

Facilities

Facilities at the Penrhyn Road campus include:

The pharmacy lab: Central to your learning is our new pharmacy practice laboratory, designed to allow you to experience what it is like in a real pharmacy and finesse your skills before you start working in the health service. Based at our Penrhyn Road campus, the £420,000 centre includes:

  • 40 medicine-dispensing stations;
  • a pharmacy counter;
  • a consulting area; and
  • computers connected to the Nexphase system (used in many local pharmacies).

You practice your people and diagnostic skills through role plays, taking it in turns to play the patient.

When dispensing prescriptions you have to make all the same checks that you would make in a real pharmacy, including:

  • analysing prescriptions to check they have been filled in correctly by doctors;
  • checking clinical issues such as how one medicine might interact with another; and
  • advising pretend patients on how to take their prescriptions.

Other facilities: You will also have access to:

  • the £9.8million Eadweard Muybridge building with state-of the art laboratories;
  • specialist equipment, such as:
    • gas and liquid chromatography;
    • electron microscopy;
    • a range of spectrometers, including mass spectrometers, infrared spectrometers and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers;
    • nuclear science equipment;
    • thermal analysis;
    • x-ray diffractometers; and
    • electrochemical analysis;
  • computing laboratories and a team of IT technicians to offer assistance

The Learning Resources Centre offers:

  • subject libraries, plus a free inter-library loan scheme to other libraries in the Greater London area;
  • online database subscriptions; and

growing selection of resource materials.

Course fees and funding

2021/22 fees for this course

The tuition fee you pay depends on whether you are assessed as a 'Home' (UK), 'Islands' or 'International' student. In 2021/22 the fees for this course are:

 Fee category Amount
Home (UK students) £9,250*
International Year 1 (2021/22): £15,000
Year 2 (2022/23): £15,400

* For full time programmes of a duration of more than one academic year, the published fee is an annual fee, payable each year, for the duration of the programme. Your annual tuition fees cover your first attempt at all of the modules necessary to complete that academic year. A re-study of any modules will incur additional charges calculated by the number of credits. Home tuition fees may be subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body. Full time taught International fees are subject to an annual increase and are published in advance for the full duration of the programme.

You should be aware that if you want to 'top-up' to an honours degree on completion of the foundation degree, the fee for the top-up year for home (UK) students is the standard undergraduate fee, currently £9,250 for the 2021/22 academic year (this may increase for future years of study).

Eligible UK students can apply to the Government for a tuition loan, which is paid direct to the University. This has a low interest rate which is charged from the time the first part of the loan is paid to the University until you have repaid it.

2020/21 fees for this course

The tuition fee you pay depends on whether you are assessed as a 'Home' (UK or EU), 'Islands' or 'International' student. In 2020/21 the fees for this course are:

 Fee category Amount
Home (UK and EU students) £9,250*
International Year 1 (2020/21): £14,600
Year 2 (2021/22): £15,000

* For full time programmes of a duration of more than one academic year, the published fee is an annual fee, payable each year, for the duration of the programme. Your annual tuition fees cover your first attempt at all of the modules necessary to complete that academic year. A re-study of any modules will incur additional charges calculated by the number of credits. Home/EU tuition fees may be subject to annual increases but will not increase by more than the fee caps as prescribed by the Office for Students or such other replacing body. Full time taught International fees are subject to an annual increase and are published in advance for the full duration of the programme.

You should be aware that if you want to 'top-up' to an honours degree on completion of the foundation degree, the fee for the top-up year for home (UK and EU) students is the standard undergraduate fee, currently £9,250 for the 2020/21 academic year (this may increase for future years of study).

Eligible UK and EU students can apply to the Government for a tuition loan, which is paid direct to the University. This has a low interest rate which is charged from the time the first part of the loan is paid to the University until you have repaid it.

Additional costs

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

Where a course has additional expenses, we make every effort to highlight them. These may include optional field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering), security checks such as DBS, uniforms, specialist clothing or professional memberships.

Textbooks

Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. You may prefer to, or be required to, buy your own copy of key textbooks.

Computer equipment

There are open-access networked computers available across the University, plus laptops available to loan. You may find it useful to have your own PC, laptop or tablet which you can use around campus and in halls of residence.

Free WiFi is available on each of the campuses.

Printing

In the majority of cases coursework can be submitted online. There may be instances when you will be required to submit work in a printed format. Printing and photocopying costs are not included in your tuition fees.

Travel

Travel costs are not included but we do have a free intersite bus service which links the campuses and halls of residence.

Note for EU students: UK withdrawal from the European Union

The Government has recently announced that new students from the European Union and Swiss Nationals starting their course after August 2021 will no longer be eligible for a student loan in England for Undergraduate or Postgraduate studies for 2021/22 academic year. This decision only applies to new EU students starting in 2021/22. If you are an existing/continuing EU student, you will continue to be funded until you graduate or withdraw from your course.

Need to know more?

Our undergraduate fees and funding section provides information and advice on money matters.

After you graduate

Careers and progression

Through a pharmacy or chemistry degree you'll be well prepared for roles in community or hospital pharmacies, or in the pharmaceutical industry. Further study can lead to a career as a registered pharmacist or in drug/medicine research.

Careers and recruitment advice

The Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing has a specialist employability team. It provides friendly and high-quality careers and recruitment guidance, including advice and sessions on job-seeking skills such as CV preparation, application forms and interview techniques. Specific advice is also available for international students about the UK job market and employers' expectations and requirements.

The team runs employer events throughout the year, including job fairs, key speakers from industry and interviews on campus. These events give you the opportunity to hear from, and network with, employers in an informal setting.

Examples of graduate destinations

Types of jobs

  • Research scientist
  • PhD student
  • Drug safety associate
  • Strategic alliance manager
  • Research assistant
  • Quality control analyst
  • Clinical trial project manager
  • Pharmacy technician
  • Microbiologist
  • Optical assistant/dispenser
  • Marketing research
  • Medical publisher

Employers

  • Parallel Drug Imports
  • Johnson & Johnson
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Braun Medical
  • St George's Hospital
  • EH Lilly
  • NHS
  • King Opticians
  • Alcontrol Lab
  • Nemaura Pharma Ltd
  • Quotient BioResearch
  • Syngenta
  • Medtrack

Employability preparation at Kingston University

In addition to building expertise in your own discipline, our courses will also help you to develop key transferable skills that you'll need for professional life or further study once you graduate.

As well as a range of careers and employability activities at Kingston, we also offer you the chance to apply and develop your skills in live contexts as an integral part of your course. Opportunities include:

  • placements;
  • working or studying abroad;
  • volunteering;
  • peer mentoring roles; and
  • internship opportunities within and outside the University.

In your final year, you'll get the opportunity to complete a major 'capstone' project where you can apply the knowledge and skills you have acquired to a range of real issues in different contexts. This is a great way to learn and is a valuable bridge to employment or further research at masters level.

Courses available after you graduate

If you decide that you would like to go on to postgraduate study after your undergraduate course, we offer a 10 per cent discount on our postgraduate course tuition fees to our alumni. 

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council, until 2020 entry, to allow graduates who have attained the required standards direct entry to Year 2 of the Master of Pharmacy programme.

What our students say

Various lecturers at Kingston University (including Dr Ghatora, Dr Freestone, Dr Kishi and Dr Williams) helped motivate me and gave me self-belief - as well as making education fun. During my final year the support of these teachers was very important to me due to the intense workloads and they were constantly helping by pointing me in the right direction and providing me with time management and revision skills. They also helped me turn my weaknesses into strengths to ensure I did well. For example, during my dissertation, my spelling and grammar was poor and I didn't know how to get my point of view across. Dr Ghatora advised what I needed to do in order to receive a first in my dissertation.

Kingston University helped me in making career choices as I was unsure of what sector of pharmaceutical science I wanted to work in until I took a module called Modern Industrial Practice and spoke to a lecturer and the careers department.

Omotade Idris Shittu – Pharmaceutical and Chemical Sciences FdSc and Pharmaceutical Science BSc(Hons)

Work placements

How you can work in industry during your course

All students undertake a placement in a business or NHS environment throughout the course, perhaps in a community pharmacy or a pharmaceutical company, for example. This will be for at least one day a week and can be either paid or voluntary. An agreement is set up between the employer and the University recognising that elements of your work will contribute to your studies.

We encourage you to find your own placement, but we can also help you to find a suitable employer if necessary.

Changes to courses for 2020/21 due to Covid-19

Changes detailed here are for students who will be starting the course in September 2020.

Course information (changes for 2020 entry)

Composition of the course

We do not anticipate making any changes to the composition of the course, i.e. number of modules or credits in a year, as a result of the pandemic.

In order to safeguard our students' health and safety and to minimise the risk of disruption to their studies, the University has postponed all Study Abroad programmes for outgoing students in the first teaching block of 2020/21. The University will review this decision before the second teaching block and will take into account relevant government advice at that time.

Changes can be made to courses as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to the composition of the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Modules

We do not anticipate making any changes to module titles and summaries or to the availability of modules as a result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to modules as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area and to provide a high quality student experience. Any such changes made to module titles and/or availability of modules will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Length of course

We expect to deliver the course within the planned timescales to enable successful students to progress through and graduate from the course without delay.

In exceptional circumstances the sequence of learning and teaching activities may be changed, e.g. re-sequencing those modules that can be delivered more effectively under the current restrictions with those which would be more difficult to deliver, such as practical modules and placements.

If the current pandemic situation continues into the next academic year and beyond, the University may be unable to offer suitable placements which may then impact the length of the course. In these circumstances the University will provide students with appropriate alternative options and ensure that support will be available to them so that they are able to make informed choices.

Entry requirements (changes for 2020 entry)

We have not changed entry requirements as a result of the pandemic. However, the range of accepted alternatives have increased as has the way in which we select students, which now includes virtual interviews and online portfolios.

Entry requirements for international students

We have not changed entry requirements for international students as a result of the pandemic. However, in response to the pandemic, we now accept a much broader list of English language exams for entry to the course; the level of these exams remain the same.

Teaching (changes for 2020 entry)

Changes to the way the course will be delivered

Due to the current pandemic the course's teaching and learning activities will be delivered through both online and on-campus methods (blended learning) in 2020/21. In order to provide all students with a comparable on-campus experience, the University has committed to ensuring that all courses provide at least 30% of their teaching and learning activities on-campus.

Practicals will be delivered mostly on campus. For workshops, these will be delivered by a mix of on campus and virtual online activities but with no change in the total hours of delivery.

While physical distancing measures remain in place, you will receive your learning and teaching via a blend of on-campus and on-line activities. Should your circumstances prevent your attendance at on-campus sessions, you will still be able to engage with your course in a way that allows you to progress. Where this is not possible, support will be available to consider what options are open to you.

Changes to teaching in the event of a further lockdown or adjustments in government advice

The University will continue to closely monitor government announcements and advice in relation to the current pandemic and, where required, will take any necessary action in order to comply with such advice.

In the event that a further lockdown is enforced the University will aim to deliver the course fully online. This may require some additional changes being made to planned teaching and learning activities, including assessments. The majority of our courses are prepared to be delivered fully online if the situation requires it. Where the quality of the student experience may be compromised significantly, or the course is unable to be delivered fully online, the University may need to suspend the delivery of that course until a time that it can be delivered appropriately. Students will be supported in these situations to ensure they are able to make the right choices for their particular circumstances.

In the event that the current social distancing restrictions are fully lifted and the University is able to resume normal delivery of teaching and learning activities, courses will assess whether it is in the students' interest to resume normal delivery. In some cases it may be better to continue and complete modules under the planned blended delivery mode.

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for Year 1

Changes to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours will not be made as a result of the pandemic. However, it is possible that some adjustments might be made at module level, e.g. a few more scheduled activities, in order to help ensure student engagement with blended learning.

Any changes made to the overall breakdown of scheduled teaching hours, placements and guided independent study hours for year 1 of the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

'Scheduled teaching' includes teaching that is online either live or recorded / on demand.

Timetable

Your individualised timetable for teaching block 1 (i.e. up to December 2020) should be available by the end of August. Timetables for teaching block 2 (i.e. from January 2021) will not be available until the autumn. Whilst we make every effort to ensure timetables are as student-friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week between 9am and 9pm. To accommodate smaller group sizes and social distancing, we will need to maximise the time available for teaching. This means, we may have to use Wednesday afternoons and enrichment week for additional teaching slots. Timetables for part-time students will depend on the modules selected.

Class sizes

On-campus teaching may involve smaller class sizes in line with social distance requirements.

Assessment (changes for 2020 entry)

Changes can be made to modules, including how they are assessed, as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our modules up to date with current developments in that subject area. Due to the current restrictions in place, i.e. social distancing, it is anticipated that many formal on-campus examinations, including practical examinations, will be replaced with alternative assessments which can be completed online. These changes will be considered and approved through the University's processes to ensure that student assessments will be able to demonstrate they have achieved the expected learning outcomes. The approval process will also assess whether the change impacts the status of any professional body accreditation the course benefits from.

Any changes to the overall methods of assessment for Year 1 of the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Staff (changes for 2020 entry)

No changes are expected to the general level of experience or status of staff involved in delivering the course.

As a result of the social distancing restrictions in place, on-campus teaching activities may need to be split into smaller groups which may require the support of teaching assistants and student mentors, who will be managed by experienced staff.

Fees, funding and additional costs (changes for 2020 entry)

Tuition fees

There will be no changes to published tuition fees for 2020/21.

Additional costs (e.g. field trips, materials, equipment, etc.)

As a result of the blended delivery of courses in 2020/21, where a significant proportion of the teaching will be done online, students will need a personal laptop or computer and access to the internet to participate in online teaching and learning activities. Students who are able to travel will have access to computers on campus, however, it should be noted that access to on-campus facilities will be restricted due to social distancing requirements.

The University is considering how best to provide support to students who do not have access to suitable hardware and software requirements and access to the internet. Identifying students who require this type of support is an important milestone for the University in our journey to ensure equity of access while we continue to deliver our blended approach. Information about the support that will be available will be provided to students during the induction period.

Funding

There will be no changes to any existing University funding arrangements for 2020/21. Currently there are no indications from the UK government that there will be any changes to government funding arrangements.

Fees and funding for international students

There will be no changes to published tuition fees or funding arrangements specifically relating to international students for 2020/21.

Work placements and field trips (changes for 2020 entry)

Placements (including work and clinical placements) and field trips included as part of the course will go ahead as planned. However, to ensure students are able to gain maximum value from these activities, it may be necessary to reschedule them to later in the year, or to a different year when current restrictions have been lifted. We acknowledge that this year it may be more difficult for students to secure appropriate placements. In those situations, students will be guided and supported through the various options that will be available to them, including switching courses or interrupting their studies until a time when they can complete their placement.

Any proposed changes to placements or field trips would go through the University's agreed processes where the impact of the change will be carefully considered. Students will be advised of any changes that may become necessary and appropriate support will be available to guide them through the various options that may be available to them.

In the interest of the health and wellbeing of our students, the University will ensure that appropriate risk assessments are made before students are sent on a placement.

Courses which require placements or field trips to be completed in order to pass relevant modules will have contingency plans in place in the event that a placement or field trip cannot be completed due to another lockdown or more stringent social distancing measures.

Voluntary placements or field trips may be rescheduled, or, as a last resort, cancelled if it becomes difficult to deliver them and doing so is in the interest of the health and safety of our staff and students.

Award, qualification and accreditation (changes for 2020 entry)

Qualification

No changes will be made to the qualification awarded, e.g. BSc (Hons), as a result of the pandemic.

Changes can be made to courses, including the qualification awarded (although very rare), as part of normal enhancement processes in order to keep our courses up to date with current developments in that subject area. Any changes made to the qualification awarded for the course will be highlighted to students during the induction period.

Accreditation

During the pandemic, the University has been working closely with all its associated professional bodies to establish where flexibility/changes can be applied without undermining their professional standards. This will ensure that any changes made to courses which have professional, statutory or regulatory body (PSRB) accreditation do not negatively impact the accreditation status.

In the very exceptional circumstance that professional bodies do not agree with changes proposed, it may be necessary to defer relevant modules until those modules can be delivered as required. Students will be informed of this during the induction period and appropriately supported so that they can consider all options available to them.

Additional (changes for 2020 entry)

International students

International students should maintain awareness of the UK government's and their home country's government advice on possible travel restrictions. The University will closely monitor advice and guidance published by the UK government and assess its impact on our international students. Appropriate advice and guidance will be provided as and when required.

Students who are unable to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities

The University will ensure students who are unable to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities are able to effectively engage with their studies remotely. For certain courses an inability to attend on-campus learning and teaching activities may not be in the students best interest, as it may impede their chances of succeeding in the course or lead to them receiving a poor learning experience. In such cases students will be advised and guided through the various options available to them, such as deferring their studies until they can engage fully with the course.