Search our site
Search our site

'International' news articles

Your search returned 69 news stories:

Paralympic champion David Weir hails greater understanding of disability for being lasting legacy of London 2012 Games as he receives Kingston University honorary degree

Posted Friday 14 November 2014

Paralympic champion David Weir hails greater understanding of disability for being lasting legacy of London 2012 Games as he receives Kingston University honorary degree

Paralympian David Weir was awarded his honorary degree at a graduation ceremony staged by Kingston University's Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing.The biggest legacy of the London 2012 Games has been a change in attitudes towards disability that extends well beyond the boundaries of sport, leading British Paralympian David Weir says.

Speaking after being named an Honorary Doctor of Science by Kingston University, the 35-year-old wheelchair athlete said the phenomenal international attention the Paralympics had attracted had helped banish much of the misunderstanding that had surrounded disability. "The best thing London 2012 did was to stop people being scared of disability," the six-time gold-medallist, dubbed the Weir Wolf, explained. "That means people aren't ashamed to ask about it and people with disabilities don't have to feel embarrassed. We've grown up with it - it's part of our lives and we can talk about it. Children aren't afraid to ask things like ‘Why don't your legs work?'. They're not being rude, they're just being curious - and in terms of understanding and acceptance, that's no bad thing."...


History means Iraq will prevail in battle against Islamic State, politician and new Kingston University Honorary Doctor Baroness Nicholson contends

Posted Friday 14 November 2014

History means Iraq will prevail in battle against Islamic State, politician and new Kingston University Honorary Doctor Baroness Nicholson contends

Baroness Nicholson received an Honorary Doctorate of Letters in recognition of her outstanding contribution to international relations and human rights, particularly those of women in post-conflict and oppressed societies.Iraq will win the battle against Islamic State fighters because of its enduring traditions and founding principles as a nation, the Prime Minister's Trade Envoy to the country Baroness Emma Nicholson of Winterbourne has predicted.

The former Liberal Democrat MP and member of the European Parliament was speaking ahead of receiving an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from Kingston University's Faculty of Business and Law last week, awarded in recognition of her work in international relations and human rights - much of which has been carried out in post-conflict areas such as Iraq and Afghanistan....


Kingston University creative writing graduate Sumia Sukkar's debut novel inspired by Syrian conflict dramatised on BBC Radio 4

Posted Friday 7 November 2014

Kingston University creative writing graduate Sumia Sukkar's debut novel inspired by Syrian conflict dramatised on BBC Radio 4

Sumia Sukkar is of Syrian-Algerian descent so feels a personal connection to what has been happening in the Middle Eastern country that inspired her successful novel.A 22-year-old Kingston University creative writing graduate whose career as a professional writer has already had an impressive launch is soaring higher still as, just over a year after publication, her debut novel has been dramatised for BBC Radio 4.

Sumia Sukkar's book ‘The Boy from Aleppo Who Painted the War' tells the story of the ongoing conflict in Syria through the eyes of a 14-year-old boy with Aspergers Syndrome. Since its release by Eyewear Publishing in summer 2013 - the day after Sumia's degree graduation ceremony - the novel has already prompted a raft of enthusiastic reviews. It has now been thrust even more firmly in to the spotlight with Sumia being interviewed by John Wilson on Radio 4's arts review programme Front Row on Friday 7 November and the drama adaptation having aired on Saturday 8 November as part of a series showing different perspectives on the war in Syria....


Kingston MBA in Moscow placed at the top of the MBA rankings in Russia

Posted Monday 3 November 2014

Kingston MBA in Moscow placed at the top of the MBA rankings in Russia

The Kingston MBA in Moscow has once again been ranked at the top of MBA programmes in Russia by major newspaper Izverstiya. The rankings are based on salary increase of graduates, the length of time to achieve a promotion or secure a new role after completing the course, quality of networking opportunities and personal and professional development; the latter receiving a 4.82/5.00 rating. The programme has previously been ranked number one by Izvestia, as well as by the business journal Company Secrets.

"To continue to be at the top of the MBA rankings in one of the fastest growing economies in the world speaks to the quality of the Kingston MBA," explains course director Dr Kent Springdal. "The partnership between Kingston and the Academy adds a powerful, global dimension to our programme and gives students from both schools a unique opportunity to gain a comparative understanding of business practices in the UK and Russia."...


Kingston University design expert unveils new guide highlighting ways sensory rooms can improve dementia care

Posted Wednesday 22 October 2014

Kingston University design expert unveils new guide highlighting ways sensory rooms can improve dementia care

The researchers recommend that care homes catering for people with dementia set aside special areas to stimulate sight, sound, touch, taste, smell and movement.Research spearheaded by a design expert from Kingston University is shedding new light on the positive impact multi-sensory environments can have in dementia care.

Academic expert Dr Anke Jakob, from Kingston's Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, has joined forces with Dr Lesley Collier, from the University of Southampton, to produce a new guide for care homes highlighting the importance of sensory areas specifically created to meet the needs of people living with the condition. Their publication, How to Make a Sensory Room for People Living with Dementia, was unveiled as part of the Inside Out Festival, which showcased the contributions universities make to London's cultural life....


Kingston University students boost international experience in volunteering venture backed by Lebara Foundation

Posted Friday 17 October 2014

Kingston University students boost international experience in volunteering venture backed by Lebara Foundation

Kingston University journalism graduate Roxii Hoare-Smith surrounded by some of the children she met volunteering in India through the Lebara Foundation project.Student volunteers from Kingston University have stepped out of the lecture theatre to broaden their international horizons by supporting refugee communities in India. A 12-strong party of current students and recent graduates has spent three weeks in Chennai running English language workshops, art and craft sessions and sport activities specially devised for children and their mothers living in impoverished parts of the Indian city.

During the expedition, group members worked in a slum area inhabited by families displaced by the 2004 tsunami and two camps that are home to Tamil refugees from Sri Lanka. The project got off the ground with the backing of the Lebara Foundation - the charitable arm of global telecommunications company Lebara, co-founded by Kingston University graduate Yoganathan Ratheesan....


Postgraduate student volunteer shares experiences of Lebara Foundation visit to India

Posted Friday 17 October 2014

Postgraduate student volunteer shares experiences of Lebara Foundation visit to India

Jessica Farrugia was one of a 12-strong party of Kingston University student and graduate volunteers who spent three weeks in India as part of a new initiative backed by the Lebara Foundation. Initially not sure quite what to expect, the BA(Hons) English Literature graduate, who has now returned to the books to complete an MA in the same subject, recounts how she was particularly touched by the children she met during her stay.

MA English Literature student Jessica Farrugia worked with people displaced by the 2004 tsunami during the Lebara Foundation-sponsored visit to India.Before taking part in Kingston University's pilot volunteer project in India, I'd never travelled outside Europe and I'd never worked with underprivileged communities. Although I was excited about the opportunity to embrace a new experience, it wasn't until after I'd been accepted that I began to think about the realities of the project - the visa application, the vaccinations, the pre-departure sessions, the fundraising, the flight, and that's all before I'd even set foot in India. Luckily, the Lebara Foundation, which was sponsoring the project, had organised three orientation days to cushion our arrival in Chennai, which allowed our group to get to grips with the schedule and to recover from jet lag. During those three days, we visited each of the three sites where we would be working over the coming weeks - two of which were refugee camps inhabited by families displaced during the Sri Lankan civil war....


Denim and dunces' hats take centre stage as Kingston University MA Fashion designer makes catwalk statement on plight of Spanish economy

Posted Tuesday 7 October 2014

Denim and dunces' hats take centre stage as Kingston University MA Fashion designer makes catwalk statement on plight of Spanish economy

Esme Dominguez Pueyo's collection included dunces' hats portraying Spanish people who she believes are being fooled regarding the state of their economy.Denim workwear and dunces' hats have been given the haute couture treatment by a Kingston University MA Fashion student. Esme Dominguez Pueyo has used her latest collection, showcased during London Fashion Week, to make a stand about the impact of economic austerity in her native Spain. The menswear includes jersey T-shirts emblazoned with statistics, suits made from 100 per cent cotton denim and dunces' hats produced to portray her view that Spaniards are being fooled by the nation's politicians.

The 24 year old designer, originally from Valencia, worked with small, established British labels to develop her collection, called System Error. They included The London Cloth Company, home to one of the capital's first micro-mills using 19th Century looms, to create some of her cotton and indigo-dyed denim designs. Milliner House of Flora meanwhile produced the dunces' hats from a combination of net and printed fabric. Esme drew her inspiration for the thought-provoking headwear from artist and satirist Goya....

News