Search our site
Search our site

'International' news articles

Your search returned 80 news stories:

Kingston University experts to play key role in European Commission-backed project to help stamp out doping on the amateur sport and fitness circuit

Posted Wednesday 13 May 2015

Kingston University experts to play key role in European Commission-backed project to help stamp out doping on the amateur sport and fitness circuit

Project SAFE YOU will educate young people about the perils of performance-enhancing drugs. Image: DreamstimeKingston University is playing a key role in a major European initiative to educate young fitness and sports enthusiasts about the dangers of doping and ways to avoid falling victim to the perils of performance and image-enhancing substances. Project SAFE YOU (Strengthening the Anti-doping Fight in Fitness and Exercise in Youth) is being launched with more than €400,000 backing from the European Commission. It will lead to the development of an online tool that will also serve as a comprehensive source of support for teachers, coaches and instructors responsible for anti-doping education.

Headed by Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece, the project will draw on the knowledge of a consortium of global experts, including senior academics from Kingston University, the University of Rome Foro Italico and the University of Potsdam in Germany. They will work alongside the German Anti-Doping Agency, the Cyprus Sport Organisation and Greece's Ministry of Culture, Education and Religious Affairs....


Kingston University's heat acclimation expertise helps Sir Ranulph Fiennes and other British athletes prepare for the rigours of the Marathon des Sables footrace

Posted Friday 24 April 2015

The winner of the woman\'s race, Elisabet BarnesThe Kingston University Sport Science Consultancy Team has assisted in the training of athletes preparing to compete in the 2015 Marathon des Sables. The race, which celebrated its 30th anniversary this year, is a six-day, 251km (156m) ultramarathon, the equivalent of six regular marathons, which is held each year in the Sahara Desert in temperatures of up to 50°C.

This year, Kingston University provided heat acclimation support to around 25 athletes racing in the desert, including the winner of the women's race, Elisabet Barnes, who won all five stages outright, finishing 19th overall. Elisabet has had a great year of ultra-running, already winning numerous UK races and is planning on going back to the Sahara next year to defend her title. Fellow Brit Gemma Game finished fourth in the women's field and 87th overall.

Danny Kendall, a regular user of the facilities at Kingston University, was looking to improve on his 2014 position of fourth. However, increased competition saw him finish in eighth position overall, the highest-placed British athlete in a world-class field.

Dr Hannha Moir is filmed while assessing Sir Ranulph Fiennes\' firness

Kingston University also helped explorer and adventurer Sir Ranulph Fiennes prepare to be the oldest Briton to complete the event in aid of Marie Curie. Senior lecturer in Health and Exercise Dr Hannah Moir and physiology technician Chris Howe also provided day-by-day analysis of Sir Ranulph's progress throughout the event.

There were many more competitors that were supported by the Kingston University team this year. Two of the athletes, Susie and Shaun, who used the heat chamber and completed the MDS 2015, have further reason to celebrate following their engagement after Shaun battled through sickness during the race to propose on the finish line.

Find out more about heat acclimatisation training at Kingston University

Find out more about studying Exercise, Nutrition & Health BSc(Hons) at Kingston University.


Staff pay tribute to 'larger than life' enterprise and engineering champion Andrew Self

Posted Friday 17 April 2015

Staff pay tribute to 'larger than life' enterprise and engineering champion Andrew Self

Professor Andrew Self was instrumental in building Kingston University's industry-wide reputation for engineering.Messages of condolence have been pouring in to Kingston University following the death of Professor Andrew Self who has died after a long battle with cancer. Professor Self was the University's Pro Vice-Chancellor for Enterprise and Innovation until his retirement in 2006.

He joined Kingston University in 1994 as a professor of engineering and soon became the Head of the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Production Engineering. Engineering expert Dr Akbar Aboutorabi, who worked alongside Professor Self for many years, said it had been his vision, determination and hard work that had made the school the top provider of engineering teaching in the country. "Andrew was an entrepreneurial and unconventional leader who was passionate about his work and the welfare of his colleagues," he recalled. "Through his visionary foresight and extraordinary zest for innovation, Andrew led the development of Kingston's aircraft maintenance programme in collaboration with City of Bristol College, KLM and others."...


Students from the School of Geography, Geology and the Environment ‘think critically to make a difference' for South African settlement

Posted Thursday 5 March 2015

A student with some of the village children - Photo courtesy of Corinne CummingA student with some of the village children - Photo courtesy of Corinne CummingKingston University students and academics flew to South Africa for a two-week field course that saw them actively involved in the lives of locals in different locations. This included working with the residents of Village Heights - an impoverished informal settlement on the outskirts of Cape Town.

Working with the community and with landscape architects and representatives from the Cape Town municipality the students cleared land to create a community garden, shifting 250 bags of household waste, concrete blocks, old mattresses and rubber tyres. Village Heights inhabitants often build their homes with corrugated iron, offcuts of wood, polythene and other found materials. They even created benches, chairs and a see-saw from the debris. The organic compost for the garden was funded by the carbon credits the students bought to offset the carbon footprint caused by their trip.

The school of Geography, Geology and the Environment students on their trip to South Africa - Photo courtesy of Corinne Cumming The school of Geography, Geology and the Environment students on their trip to South Africa - Photo courtesy of Corinne Cumming

The School of Geography, Geology and the Environment were invited to Village Heights through links Kingston University lecturers had built with the Cape Town municipality over several years. This trip gives students a unique opportunity to work with locals and debate development issues in a real-life context while learning more about the challenges facing residents while outside of a classroom setting.

Making use of found materials to create playground activities - Photo courtesy of Corinne Cumming Making use of found materials to create playground activities - Photo courtesy of Corinne CummingThe students all study the Development Geographies module, which introduces critical issues of development including resource management, poverty, exclusion, inequality, natural hazards, gender and conflict. The ethos behind the trip was think critically to make a difference. Different days focused on different issues such as socio-spatial inequality, legacies of apartheid, rural development and eco-tourism, carbon-neutral agricultural and ecological conservation strategies and land management challenges.

• Find out more about studying Geography at Kingston University
• Find out more about the School of Geography, Geology and the Environment at Kingston University.


Kingston University MBA among Europe's top 50 in QS Global 200 Business Schools ranking report 2015

Posted Friday 13 February 2015

Kingston Business School BuildingKingston Business School BuildingKingston Business School's full-time MBA has been ranked 43 out of 200 in the latest QS Fulltime MBA rankings of business schools across Europe. The survey asks international employers to select the schools from which they consider hiring MBA graduates. This information is combined with the QS Intelligence Unit survey of academics from all over the world each year to produce the final ranking.

Employers returning data in the European section included companies from the finance, technology and consulting sectors including Google, Bloomberg, PWC, Microsoft, Deutsche Bank, AXA and more. Experienced HR and line managers from each company are asked a series of questions about MBA recruitment in the previous and the forthcoming year. They are then asked to list, unprompted, the international schools from which they have recently attempted to recruit MBAs.

This is the first year that Kingston University has been included in this ranking. Recent improvements to the MBA programme include a renewed focus on the global nature of business, offering students opportunities to study modules in both Berlin and Moscow, and the introduction of a dedicated MBA careers coach and an MBA Careers Week.

Most recently, Kingston Business School has partnered with the prestigious Boston University in the USA to offer postgraduates a high-quality, international education leading to a dual degree from the two institutions. Kingston Business School's international collaborations include delivering the Kingston MBA with a partner in Moscow - the Russian Presidential Academy of the National Economy and Public Administration. This MBA has been ranked number one in Russia several times.

Ron Tuninga, dean of the Faculty of Business and Law welcomed the new ranking, saying that it was a tremendous achievement for the Business School and highly deserved; "We now rank more highly than some well-known schools on the continent such as Vlerick School of Business in Belgium." Chris Bristow, director of the MBA programmes, said: "It is a tribute both to the teaching team and the excellent MBA participants who join us from far and wide to make this a truly international, transformational programme".


Korean teachers sign up for three more years of English language development with Kingston University

Posted Thursday 29 January 2015

Korean teachers sign up for three more years of English language development with Kingston University

Each January, Kingston University hosts 20 English teachers from the Chungcheongbuk-Do region of South Korea, for a month long, residential continuing professional development course with English Language Development, within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS).

The programme has been running for four years and FASS was delighted to sign an agreement for a further three years during a formal ceremony at County Hall with Chungcheongbuk-Do's governor of Education; Professor Martin McQuillan, dean of FASS; and Dr David Mackintosh, senior deputy vice-chancellor....


Kingston University architecture graduate Simon Dean awarded the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Bronze Medal for the best degree-level design project

Posted Friday 16 January 2015

A recent Kingston University graduate has received one of the most prestigious international awards in architectural education, beating submissions from 317 schools of architecture in 61 countries. Simon Dean, who graduated from the University's BA (Hons) Architecture course in 2014, was presented with The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Bronze Medal for the best degree-level design project, at the RIBA Presidents Medals award ceremony.

Simon's project, entitled Flow 1944, was chosen by a distinguished panel of judges. It was produced as part of Kingston University's School of Architecture and Landscape's examination of sites within UNESCO World Heritage contexts and proposes a design for a bathhouse carved into solidified lava that erupted from Mount Vesuvius in 1944.

Announcing Simon's award David Gloster, RIBA director of Education said: "The judges were impressed with the student's beautifully crafted images and models and how these delicately created a seductive landscape from which a new architecture may be born."

Simon Dean (centre) is presented with his RIBA Bronze Medal by Roz Barr, RIBA vice-president Education and Stephen Hodder, RIBA president.Simon Dean (centre) is presented with his RIBA Bronze Medal by Roz Barr, RIBA vice-president Education and Stephen Hodder, RIBA president.

The RIBA President's Medals are considered the world's most prestigious and established awards in architectural education. The Bronze and Silver medals are of equal merit, being presented to students at different stages of their education. The Bronze medal recognises the design work of students at Part 1 - normally the first three of five years of the professional qualification in architecture. The Silver Medal goes to students at Part 2 - usually the last two years of the architecture qualification. A Dissertation Medal was introduced in 2001 to reward written work produced at either Part 1 or 2.

Simon's work will now form part of an exhibition of selected awards' entries at the RIBA headquarters in London for two months, before touring the UK and overseas. His success follows notable achievements for other past Kingston University students. In 2013, Minghui Ke and Shapur Keshvari received commendations in the Bronze Medal and Dissertation Medal categories respectively. The Royal Institute of British Architects is the oldest and most influential architectural institution in the world. It has over 43,000 members internationally, including 13,000 students.

• Find out more about the School of Architecture and Landscape at Kingston University.


Double Booker prize-winning author Hilary Mantel announces winner of Kingston University's first international short story competition

Posted Friday 19 December 2014

Double Booker prize-winning author Hilary Mantel announces winner of Kingston University's first international short story competition

Michelle Cahill's prize-winning short-story, Duende, was inspired by Spanish poet Frederico Garcia-Lorca.An Australian poet has been announced as the winner of Kingston University's inaugural Hilary Mantel International Short Story competition.

Michelle Cahill was awarded the £3,000 first prize by the double Booker award-winning author who lent her name to the competition. Hilary Mantel CBE announced Ms Cahill's work, Duende, as the winning entry at a special lunch held in Kingston in December. Prizes of £500 each went to the two runners up, Annemarie Neary for her short story One Day in Sarajevo and Rick Williams for What Lies Beneath....

Contact us

General enquiries:

Journalists only:
Press Office
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 3034

Contact us

General enquiries:

Journalists only:
Press Office
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 3034

News