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Kingston Business School joins elite group of 5 per cent of top institutions worldwide awarded prestigious AACSB accreditation

Posted Wednesday 10 August 2016

Kingston Business School joins elite group of 5 per cent of top institutions worldwide awarded prestigious AACSB accreditation

Kingston Business School has joined an elite group of global institutions awarded prestigious international accreditation by the AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business). A hallmark of excellence in business education, the accreditation has been earned by just 5 per cent of the world's business schools.

AACSB International is the longest-serving global accrediting body for business schools offering undergraduate, masters and doctoral programmes in business and accounting. Only 777 of the more than 16,000 schools that grant business degrees worldwide have received the AACSB seal of approval....


Kingston University art graduate's installation celebrating women's suffrage movement unveiled in Parliament

Posted Tuesday 2 August 2016

Kingston University art graduate's installation celebrating women's suffrage movement unveiled in Parliament

A Kingston University alumna's artwork celebrating the campaign for women's right to vote has been unveiled at the Houses of Parliament. New Dawn by artist Mary Branson is positioned directly above the spot where thousands of women and men demonstrated for equal rights during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The six metre high contemporary light sculpture features 168 hand-blown glass discs in the shape of a dawning sun – a symbol often adopted by the suffrage movement during its campaign. The work hangs above the entrance to St Stephen's Hall, a space that was regularly used for suffragette protests.Mary Branson in the Original Act Room, in Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster. Photo: Mat ClarkThe blown glass scrolls vary in size and include the colours used by all the women's suffrage organisations. Their design is inspired by towering parchment rolls containing the Acts of Parliament stored in the Original Act Room in Victoria Tower. The piece is also linked to a tide gauge on Tower Bridge that monitors the Thames – as the tide ebbs and flows, the backlighting of the glass changes over a 12-hour period. "The movement of colour reminds us of the unstoppable tide of change – another symbol often used by the suffrage movement," Branson explained.The New Dawn commission was announced at an International Women's Day event in 2015, sponsored by the Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art. The work is the culmination of Branson's six-month term as artist-in-residence at the Houses of Parliament. "It was a great opportunity to learn about the movement and its influence on our modern democratic society. I came to the post knowing little more than the suffragettes' story, so I spent my residency studying archives and petitions, as well as interviewing MP's and talking to historians and academics associated with women's rights," she said. "We discussed their feelings about the vote and what they thought might make a fitting tribute to all those who had marched and petitioned for equality."Branson nurtured her skills in the workshops at Kingston University's Knights Park campus, graduating with an MA in Art and Space with distinction in 2004. "My tutors really inspired and challenged me and my time at university helped set the pattern for how I work today," she said. "I think it's important to try to understand your core ideas and to question your own work constantly in order to refine it."New Dawn, situated above the entrance to St Stephen's Hall in the Houses of Parliament. Photo: Emma BrownProfessor Louis Nixon was Branson's tutor during her studies at the University's Faculty of Art, Design & Architecture and remembers her as an outstanding student. "She has continued to develop the creative interests that motivated her during the MA course to build an inspiring artistic career," he said. "I am so proud of her winning such a significant commission and impressed by the powerful and imaginative way her artwork has commemorated this important historical event."The project is the first permanent piece of abstract art commissioned for the Palace of Westminster. It was unveiled on 7 June, exactly 150 years after the first mass petition for women's suffrage was presented to Parliament. The multitude of colours used in the piece pay homage to the organisations involved in the suffrage movement, including the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, the Women's Freedom League and the Men's League for Women's Suffrage.Lord Speaker Baroness Frances D'Souza – one of the country's most prominent female parliamentarians – said the role women had played in shaping the history of modern democracy was a subject close to her heart. "Honouring the campaign for women's rights through art and, in particular, through such a spectacular work as this is something I wholeheartedly support. I hope the beauty of New Dawn and the values it embodies are appreciated by visitors to Parliament for years to come."Branson said she was honoured to have been given the commission. "For women especially, I hope the piece is a celebration of power and determination, she added "It's a fascinating period in history that enabled me to have a voice and has influenced the way I live my life now. I hope it is worthy of all the brave people who fought for equality."...


New science laboratories set to open at Kingston University as first stage of £6.8m project part-funded by Government grant nears completion

Posted Thursday 14 July 2016

New science laboratories set to open at Kingston University as first stage of £6.8m project part-funded by Government grant nears completion

The first stage of a £6.8m project to create new state-of -the-art science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) facilities at Kingston University's Penrhyn Road campus has been completed and is set to open to students in September.

The Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing secured £1.9m of Government funding from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) towards the project, which is delivering cutting-edge new laboratories and science and technology facilities for the benefit of the public as well as current and future students....


High quality research at Kingston University showcased during student conferences

Posted Wednesday 13 July 2016

High quality research at Kingston University showcased during student conferences

Postgraduate researchers from the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing recently shared some of the latest cutting edge research being undertaken at the University, during two student conferences held in June.

Taking place during Kingston University's annual Research Week, the postgraduate conferences were hosted, organised and delivered by the students themselves....


Kingston University professor calls on Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt to introduce HPV vaccination for boys

Posted Friday 8 July 2016

Kingston University professor calls on Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt to introduce HPV vaccination for boys

Research by Professor Favato has established that vaccinating males against the HPV virus makes financial sense, overturning the outcome of previous studies and policies. The  letter delivered to Mr Hunt stated: "It not only makes sense on a public-health level, but there is now economic evidence to indicate that vaccinating both girls and boys will be cost effective. Such a step would bring the United Kingdom in to line with Australia, Austria and other countries now recommending HPV vaccination for both sexes."

HPV is the name for a group of viruses that have an affect on the moist membranes of the body. There are a number of high-risk strains and some of these can cause cervical cancer - which more than eight women per day are diagnosed with in the UK (around 3,000 cases each year). According to Professor Favato, though, what is often not realised, is that HPV infections can also lead to cancer of the anus (1,100 new cases per year) or penis (500 new cases).In 2010, Professor Favato joined a multidisciplinary research programme which aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of a gender-neutral HPV vaccination programme. Working with colleagues in public health, he developed a sophisticated economic model detailing the cost-benefit of the HPV research programme....


Scholars of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Avengers converge on Kingston University for conference examining work of writer and director Joss Whedon

Posted Wednesday 6 July 2016

Scholars of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Avengers converge on Kingston University for conference examining work of writer and director Joss Whedon

Kingston University has played host to an international conference dedicated to the work of Joss Whedon – creator of cult TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and writer and director of blockbuster film Avengers Assemble.

Taking place every two years, the Slayage Conference on the Whedonverses, brings together academics from across the globe to discuss the various works of Whedon – who is widely regarded as one of the most significant figures in popular culture. This is the first time the event has been held outside North America....


Exploring the UK freelance workforce

Posted Tuesday 5 July 2016

Exploring the UK freelance workforce

Professor John Kitching of the Small Business Research Centre, at Kingston Business School, has produced a report for the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed (IPSE) exploring the role of freelance workers in the UK economy.

IPSE commissioned the report to follow on from research on the nature and size of the UK freelance marketplace first conducted in 2008. This new report, released at the IPSE conference in April, presents data drawn from official UK government sources to develop a picture of the current UK freelance workforce and looks at trends in freelance working....


EU referendum result – a message from Kingston University's Vice-Chancellor Professor Julius Weinberg

Posted Friday 24 June 2016

EU referendum result – a message from Kingston University's Vice-Chancellor Professor Julius Weinberg

Kingston University is proud of its role as a dynamic, cosmopolitan university right on the doorstep of one of the most vibrant capital cities in the globe. Our students and staff come from across Europe and beyond – more than 140 countries in total – and the rich cultural heritage, diverse range of experiences, expertise and talent they bring makes Kingston University the very special seat of learning we are all so proud to be part of.

Britain's vote to leave the European Union is a huge decision. There will inevitably be significant issues for higher education institutions across the country to weigh up as more becomes clear about the implications for the sector during the coming weeks and months....

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