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Endurance runner Susie Chan enters Guinness World Records' books after verification of 12-hour treadmill distance set at Kingston University

Posted Tuesday 26 April 2016

Endurance runner Susie Chan enters Guinness World Records' books after verification of 12-hour treadmill distance set at Kingston University

Ultra runner Susie Chan has officially entered the record books after a 12-hour treadmill feat completed earlier this year at Kingston University was verified by Guinness World Records.

The 40 year old, who was supported by a team of sport science and exercise experts in the University's human performance laboratory, set a new women's world record for greatest distance run on a treadmill in 12 hours on 30 January. Her distance of 68.54 miles (110.24km) beat the previous official record distance of 60.26 miles (96.98km), set by Dee Boland in October last year....


Eating dark chocolate every day could help boost athletic performance, Kingston University research reveals

Posted Monday 18 April 2016

Eating dark chocolate every day could help boost athletic performance, Kingston University research reveals

Dark chocolate has already been hailed for its positive effects on cardiovascular health – and now a study undertaken at London's Kingston University has found the tasty treat could help give sports enthusiasts an extra edge in their fitness training.

A team led by postgraduate research student Rishikesh Kankesh Patel discovered that dark chocolate provides similar benefits to beetroot juice, now taken regularly by elite athletes after studies showed it can improve performance. "Beetroot juice is rich in nitrates, which are converted to nitric oxide in the body. This dilates blood vessels and reduces oxygen consumption – allowing athletes to go further for longer," Mr Patel explained....


Study involving expert from Kingston University and St George's, University of London examines pressures faced by ambulance control workers

Posted Friday 15 April 2016

Study involving expert from Kingston University and St George's, University of London examines pressures faced by ambulance control workers

Staff who co-ordinate emergency services for 999 calls to the ambulance service require support to reduce stress and sickness absence, new research has found. Professor Tom Quinn, from the Faculty of Health Social Care and Education at Kingston University and St George's, University of London, was part of a team of experts who interviewed dispatch staff, who work in ambulance control centres sending paramedics to emergencies.

The research revealed that, while dispatchers find the job rewarding, they also report feeling overworked and undervalued compared to those on the front line. It was undertaken following concerns that ambulance control staff's levels of sickness leave were twice the national average....


Ingenious ideas and innovative approaches applauded at Kingston University's annual Celebrate Enterprise awards

Posted Thursday 14 April 2016

Ingenious ideas and innovative approaches applauded at Kingston University's annual Celebrate Enterprise awards

A test that could revolutionise the way bacteria such as MRSA and MSSA are detected in hospitals, a water safety device set to improve search and rescue training and a student-focused travel company were just some of the ventures recognised at this year's Kingston University Celebrate Enterprise Awards.

The team of scientists behind a medical advance that has the potential to change the way hospitals pinpoint methicillin susceptible and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA) has become the proud holder of the gong for commercial entrepreneur. Chemists Dr Adam Le Gresley, Dr Alex Sinclair and microbiologist Professor Mark Fielder have developed a test expected to make screening for the bacteria that can cause serious infections in hospital patients significantly faster and cheaper while remaining just as effective....


Researchers at Kingston University develop new model to predict outlook for US economy

Posted Wednesday 13 April 2016

Researchers at Kingston University develop new model to predict outlook for US economy

Financial forecasting can be as precarious as trying to predict the weather, but researchers at Kingston University have developed a new way to more accurately assess the outlook for the world's biggest economy. The new model highlights the inter-dependence of household, business and government expenditure and international trade in the United States and is rooted in a new approach to economics teaching.

Traditionally, students have predominantly been taught one theory - neoclassical economics. However, since the global financial crisis hit the headlines in 2008, students across Britain have increasingly been calling for reform in the way their subject is taught....


Times Higher Education names Kingston University one of the globe's top 150 young universities

Posted Wednesday 6 April 2016

Times Higher Education names Kingston University one of  the globe's top 150 young universities

Kingston University has been named one of the world's top young universities by sector-leading publication Times Higher Education (THE). Its newly-released 150 Under 50 listing ranked universities established during the past half century on a range of measures, including teaching, research, citations, international outlook and industry income.

Founded in 1992, Kingston University is one of only 30 institutions across the whole of Britain and the United States to feature in the influential listing of what the THE considers the best global universities launched since 1966. Some 39 countries are represented, including Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, South Korea, Germany, France and Italy....


Major Kingston University-led research set to help more students progress on to further study in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

Posted Friday 4 March 2016

Major Kingston University-led research set to help more students progress on to further study in science, technology, engineering and mathematics

A national research project led by Kingston University investigating the motivations and experiences of postgraduate applicants and students has been praised across the higher education sector as one of the most comprehensive reviews of its kind.

The Postgraduate Experience Project (PEP) investigated the attitudes of students, universities and employers towards masters programmes taught in science, technology, engineering and mathematics subjects. It was devised and led by Kingston University academic Michelle Morgan, a respected national and international student experience researcher and practitioner. The aim of the two and a half year project was to gather intelligence to help universities support more people to progress on to further study and produce graduates with the skills required by businesses and industries, Ms Morgan explained....


New research led by Kingston University and St George's, University of London places stroke patients at heart of rethinking rehabilitation

Posted Wednesday 2 March 2016

New research led by Kingston University and St George's, University of London places stroke patients at heart of rethinking rehabilitation

Patients and their families are set  to play a pivotal role in finding creative ways to embed rehabilitation in every aspect of stroke unit care, to improve the pace and extent of patients' recovery before they leave hospital. New research led by Kingston University and St George's, University of London aims to identify small environmental and organisational changes that can be made on a unit that may cost very little, but have the potential to significantly improve rehabilitation.

Funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the study will be headed by Professor Fiona Jones, a rehabilitation expert from the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, run jointly by Kingston and St George's. "We want to create an environment within a stroke unit that is therapeutic and where patients can play a full role in driving their recovery," Professor Jones said. "While there have been big improvements in saving lives after stroke, there are still more than 150,000 incidences in the United Kingdom every year and many of the country's 1.2 million stroke survivors have to spend time on a stroke unit. We know from research that people can be inactive for long periods in hospital, sitting in bed with little stimulation. With some creative thinking, this time could be far better used to aid recovery."...

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