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Key to leadership success is sense of purpose, new Kingston Business School research shows

Posted Thursday 19 May 2016

Key to leadership success is sense of purpose, new Kingston Business School research shows

The question as to what makes a great leader is one that has preoccupied directors, trustees and electorates for centuries. Now Kingston University has joined forces with executive search business Adastrum Consulting to develop a new leadership model that sheds light on characteristics common amongst those on a trajectory to the top.

Research led by Dr Emma Russell and Dr Jo Yarker, from Kingston Business School, forms the basis for the new model. The study examines what drives leadership success and focuses particularly on the role and importance of ‘purpose'....


Kingston University volunteers help historians complete landmark digital archive project of British Red Cross World War One volunteers

Posted Tuesday 17 May 2016

Kingston University volunteers help historians complete landmark digital archive project of British Red Cross World War One volunteers

The stories of more than 90,000 World War One British Red Cross volunteers – whose work ranged from driving ambulances on the front line to cleaning floors in makeshift hospitals back home – can now be found online thanks to the dedication of almost 800 volunteers from Kingston University's Centre for the Historical Record.

For the past two years, a team of volunteers has been hard at work painstakingly transcribing a collection of 100-year-old personnel index cards that held the details of people who gave their time to support the war effort. Many of the 90,000 Voluntary Aid Detachments (VADs) offered their services a number of times. Each instance was recorded separately, resulting in a staggering 244,000 registration cards....


Researcher Professor Will Brooker raises the roof as David Bowie at Kingston University Ziggy Stardust tribute concert

Posted Thursday 12 May 2016

Researcher Professor Will Brooker raises the roof as David Bowie at Kingston University Ziggy Stardust tribute concert

Kingston University has once again rocked to the sounds of music superstar David Bowie - exactly 44 years after he performed as Ziggy Stardust on campus. The iconic rock legend originally took to the stage with his support band, the Spiders from Mars, on 6 May 1972 at the then Kingston Polytechnic's Penrhyn Road site for what became a seminal gig for fans. On Saturday 7 May, more than four decades later, tribute band The Thin White Duke performed a two-hour set to a sell-out audience of more than 120 Bowie devotees at Kingston University's Knights Park bar.

University film and cultural studies expert Professor Will Brooker fronted the band for a selection of the tracks in the guise of Bowie's Ziggy Stardust persona. Professor Brooker will shortly complete a year-long project exploring Bowie's career as research for an academic book entitled Forever Stardust that he has been writing about the pop icon. The study has seen Professor Brooker transform himself into Bowie, spending a few months at a time experiencing specific periods in the star's life to acquire an understanding of his creative thought processes....


Kingston University Professor Norma Clarke publishes new book on life and times of writer Oliver Goldsmith

Posted Tuesday 10 May 2016

Kingston University Professor Norma Clarke publishes new book on life and times of writer Oliver Goldsmith

A Kingston University academic is shining a spotlight on an Anglo-Irish writer with her new book about 18th Century novelist, poet and playwright Oliver Goldsmith. The book, ‘Brothers of the Quill: Oliver Goldsmith in Grub Street', by Professor of English Literature and Creative Writing Norma Clarke, picks up Goldsmith's story on his arrival in London in the late 1750s, when he was believed to be aged around 30, and follows his journey from humble beginnings as a penniless writer for hire to his inimitable rise to celebrity.

Goldsmith is best known for his novel the ‘Vicar of Wakefield' (1766), his poem ‘The Deserted Village'(1770) and his plays ‘The Good Natur'd Man' (1768) and ‘She Stoops to Conquer' (1771). He is also thought (although this is disputed in some literary circles) to have written the classic children's tale ‘The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes' - which spawned the phrase ‘goody two-shoes' to describe an excessively virtuous person. The book picks up Goldsmith's story on his arrival in London in the late 1750s."In what was then the new commercial realm of print, Goldsmith was one of the first writers to promote the professional status of a paid man of letters," Professor Clarke explained. "The 18th century saw a shift in publishing, away from patronage by the elite and in to the hands of booksellers and the buying public." Through the experiences of Goldsmith and a number of his associates - his 'brothers of the quill' - the book explores some of the tensions created by that shift....


Jamaican Government calls on Kingston University academic's expertise to tighten laws preventing money laundering

Posted Tuesday 3 May 2016

Jamaican Government calls on Kingston University academic's expertise to tighten laws preventing money laundering

The Jamaican Government has tapped in to the specialist expertise of a Kingston Law School academic to help shape new legislation to strengthen the country's laws on financial sanctions. Dr Gauri Sinha was invited to the Caribbean island to advise ministers on measures to enable the country to comply with United Nations (UN) Security Council regulations, to protect global financial systems against money laundering and financing of terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.

Law lecturer and anti-money laundering expert Dr Sinha, originally from Delhi in India, convened a workshop for several ministry representatives. "Anti-money laundering laws focus on conducting checks on large amounts of money being processed through regulated institutions such as banks, and raising red flags if something looks suspicious. My job was to make sure the Government had systems in place to raise those flags," she explained. "The UN has strict international rules relating to the prevention of terrorist financing and the spread of weapons of mass destruction, so the ministry officials wanted to make sure their laws were amended accordingly."...


Endurance runner Susie Chan enters Guinness World Records' books after verification of 12-hour treadmill distance set at Kingston University

Posted Tuesday 26 April 2016

Endurance runner Susie Chan enters Guinness World Records' books after verification of 12-hour treadmill distance set at Kingston University

Ultra runner Susie Chan has officially entered the record books after a 12-hour treadmill feat completed earlier this year at Kingston University was verified by Guinness World Records.

The 40 year old, who was supported by a team of sport science and exercise experts in the University's human performance laboratory, set a new women's world record for greatest distance run on a treadmill in 12 hours on 30 January. Her distance of 68.54 miles (110.24km) beat the previous official record distance of 60.26 miles (96.98km), set by Dee Boland in October last year....


Eating dark chocolate every day could help boost athletic performance, Kingston University research reveals

Posted Monday 18 April 2016

Eating dark chocolate every day could help boost athletic performance, Kingston University research reveals

Dark chocolate has already been hailed for its positive effects on cardiovascular health – and now a study undertaken at London's Kingston University has found the tasty treat could help give sports enthusiasts an extra edge in their fitness training.

A team led by postgraduate research student Rishikesh Kankesh Patel discovered that dark chocolate provides similar benefits to beetroot juice, now taken regularly by elite athletes after studies showed it can improve performance. "Beetroot juice is rich in nitrates, which are converted to nitric oxide in the body. This dilates blood vessels and reduces oxygen consumption – allowing athletes to go further for longer," Mr Patel explained....


Study involving expert from Kingston University and St George's, University of London examines pressures faced by ambulance control workers

Posted Friday 15 April 2016

Study involving expert from Kingston University and St George's, University of London examines pressures faced by ambulance control workers

Staff who co-ordinate emergency services for 999 calls to the ambulance service require support to reduce stress and sickness absence, new research has found. Professor Tom Quinn, from the Faculty of Health Social Care and Education at Kingston University and St George's, University of London, was part of a team of experts who interviewed dispatch staff, who work in ambulance control centres sending paramedics to emergencies.

The research revealed that, while dispatchers find the job rewarding, they also report feeling overworked and undervalued compared to those on the front line. It was undertaken following concerns that ambulance control staff's levels of sickness leave were twice the national average....

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